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  #16   ^
Old Sat, Mar-09-24, 08:48
Calianna's Avatar
Calianna Calianna is offline
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This was in my Business Insider/Insider Today email yesterday:
Quote:
Magnificent weight loss

Weight-loss drugs have become a trendy way to shed pounds in recent years. The companies behind them are now slimming down a new target: The Magnificent 7.

Mom-and-pop investors have been net sellers of most of the Magnificent 7 stocks, selling off shares of Tesla, Apple, Alphabet, and Microsoft, according to a new note from JPMorgan.

Meanwhile, pharmaceutical companies appear to have gained what the market’s tech darlings lost, writes Business Insider’s Yuheng Zhan. Eli Lilly, Pfizer, and Novo Nordisk have grabbed the attention of retail investors, according to JPMorgan.

That shift was evident Thursday. Shares of Novo Nordisk, the drug maker behind Wegovy, surged to a record high following an update on a new obesity drug, pushing its market cap ranking past Magnificent 7 laggard Tesla.

Expectations are high for fellow weight-loss drugmaker Eli Lilly. Bank of America assigned it a $1,000 price target, the highest on Wall Street, off the potential its weight-loss drug tops $60 billion in sales by 2030. And some have speculated it could become the first trillion-dollar drug company.

Market experts expected investors to exit some of their Magnificent 7 positions to realize some of the massive gains they accumulated last year. And retail investors remain buyers of Nvidia, the crown jewel of the Mag 7, JPMorgan said.

But the growth these pharma companies have already shown is impressive. And it comes despite only 1% of US adults taking weight-loss drugs, according to Bank of America, which predicts that number could rise to 15% by 2035.




Not unlike artificial intelligence, which has pushed tech stocks higher, the weight-loss drugs fueling pharmaceuticals' recent rally have their critics.


The most notable concerns stem from a lack of understanding of the long-term effects of the drugs, which act on our neural pathways. For some, their loss of appetite has come with a similar apathy towards other things, like work or sex.

Weight-loss drugs are also cutting more than just fat. Doctors have raised concerns about the major loss of muscle mass people on these drugs can experience, especially if they’re not getting enough protein or exercise.

Drug companies are already considering ways to incorporate drugs that can help users build muscle while also losing fat, according to The Atlantic.

For Wall Street, meanwhile, the equation is much simpler: Getting more people on weight-loss drugs boosts the economy. The US GDP could grow an extra 1% if 60 million Americans took GLP-1 drugs by 2028, according to Goldman Sachs’ chief economist.


There's no link available as such since it was part of the daily morning news update email, but there were multiple links to different articles within that story - most were behind a paywall though.

I was just glad to see that at least one news outlet was acknowledging some of the side effects, along with the "benefits".
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  #17   ^
Old Sat, Mar-09-24, 12:38
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GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JEY100
FDA press release: https://www.fda.gov/news-events/pre...ults-obesity-or
Full list of warnings and side effects.

It received a priority review for CVD: https://www.fda.gov/patients/fast-t...priority-review

And the biggest US insurance company of all,
AP News: this "opens the door to more people on Medicare"
https://apnews.com/article/ccbc1fc4...6596d5f7bbd6876

Yes, the fast-tracking has already started. It's become a very lucrative position to be a decision maker at the FDA. In today's WSJ article, "Wegovy Is Approved To Reduce Heart Risk," the article, likely using Novo Nordisk's actual wording, proudly trumpeted the fact that the drug/ poison not only helped 17,000 patients lose weight, "but also reduced the risk of heart attacks, strokes and cardiovascular deaths by 20%." Of course, the chicanery behind the 20% figure is that it's calculated using relative risk when comparing the 6.5% of patients experiencing those events compared to 8% in the placebo group. What is also never revealed is how the makeup of the placebo group differs at the end of the trial compared to the beginning. Many of the healthier subjects are thrown out of the trial before the final calculations. Drug trials have become the ultimate con as a shell game to produce the numbers required. The pharmaceuticals make so much money in the early years after approval, that they maintain a legal "slush fund" to finance the legal challenges sure to come. After all those, and based on the actual history of other approved drugs that have been the focus of lawsuits, the companies make a handsome profit.
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  #18   ^
Old Sun, Mar-10-24, 03:11
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GRB5111
It's become a very lucrative position to be a decision maker at the FDA.


Of course! And to think this GDP surge -- compared to the smartphone etc revolution -- is all to fix something people don't want to do to themselves, but feel helpless to stop.

It's one thing to see a market. Another to create an artificial one.
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  #19   ^
Old Sun, Mar-10-24, 14:38
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deirdra deirdra is offline
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How many Karen Carpenters will result from Wegovy? It causes bodies to consume one's own muscles to get enough protein, and some people will use it to the extreme, as with anorexia.
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  #20   ^
Old Sun, Mar-10-24, 15:45
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Calianna Calianna is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deirdra
How many Karen Carpenters will result from Wegovy? It causes bodies to consume one's own muscles to get enough protein, and some people will use it to the extreme, as with anorexia.



Since it still requires a prescription and the price is still over $1000/month, I doubt too many anorexics will be using it - they have their own tried and true methods of dealing with hunger. (And they also exercise as much as possible - gotta work off what few calories they take in)

But I can see it resulting in patients that it's deemed necessary for heart health taking it and ending up with so much muscle loss that they might as well be anorexic.

I wonder how long it will be before THEY realize that the muscle loss (particularly heart muscle loss/damage) is going to be far more of a danger for hearth health than being overweight?
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  #21   ^
Old Thu, Mar-21-24, 04:04
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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What a world these "business people" have made. One that kills off their customers! Isn't that bad business practice? Apparently not, if you drag it out. Isn't that what this amounts to?

There's a lot of foolishness baked in for the benefit of fools these days. Maybe getting that grand a month from everyone, to give them what amounts to another addictive drug.

If they rely on it to diminish their raging hunger because they won't stop eating junk, they won't get to the end of a new lifestyle.

It's just another symptom suppression tactic. Not anything actually helpful unless the patient is willing to change. It seems to be a drug version of bariatric surgery, so it's a better choice? Theoretically, I guess, because you stop the drug and the side effects go away.

Hasn't anyone noticed their drugs don't necessarily work that way any more? Which is why I am super-cautious about NSAIDS since I got such a terrible reaction from a high dose for dental. Apparently that is their "solution" to the wrist slap of the Purdue scandal. No effective pain control for anyone! Since billionaires misbehaved.

I really feel for the people you describe, but at the same time, they are simply getting themselves into another mess because they are refusing to actually fix anything about their health. Not being the size they want to be. THAT's the problem, and that is getting fixed.

Maybe I expect too much. It's not that people don't recognize how overweight isn't good for them. But being lied to every day about what is causing it doesn't leave anyone much time to sit and realize what is going on.
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  #22   ^
Old Thu, Mar-21-24, 09:47
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Calianna Calianna is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WereBear
What a world these "business people" have made. One that kills off their customers! Isn't that bad business practice? Apparently not, if you drag it out. Isn't that what this amounts to?

There's a lot of foolishness baked in for the benefit of fools these days. Maybe getting that grand a month from everyone, to give them what amounts to another addictive drug.

If they rely on it to diminish their raging hunger because they won't stop eating junk, they won't get to the end of a new lifestyle.

It's just another symptom suppression tactic. Not anything actually helpful unless the patient is willing to change. It seems to be a drug version of bariatric surgery, so it's a better choice? Theoretically, I guess, because you stop the drug and the side effects go away.

Hasn't anyone noticed their drugs don't necessarily work that way any more? Which is why I am super-cautious about NSAIDS since I got such a terrible reaction from a high dose for dental. Apparently that is their "solution" to the wrist slap of the Purdue scandal. No effective pain control for anyone! Since billionaires misbehaved.

I really feel for the people you describe, but at the same time, they are simply getting themselves into another mess because they are refusing to actually fix anything about their health. Not being the size they want to be. THAT's the problem, and that is getting fixed.

Maybe I expect too much. It's not that people don't recognize how overweight isn't good for them. But being lied to every day about what is causing it doesn't leave anyone much time to sit and realize what is going on.



There are multiple reasons why things have gotten to this point:

The medical establishment is insisting that if they simply eat lots of fruit, veggies, and whole grains, with minimal amounts of protein, all as low as possible in fats - then all their hunger pangs will go away, and they can easily lose all the weight they need to lose... and we know it doesn't work like that for so many of us.

They're being told it's purely a matter of calories in/calories out - 100% for every life form on the planet, that there are no exceptions, so if you're fat, it's because you're eating too much, plain and simple. That means you could eat nothing but cookies and candy bars and still lose weight - as long as you stay within your calorie limit.

Whether they go the "healthy food" route or the junk food route, they feel like they're starving the whole time they're on a conventional CI/CO diet, and because they're so hungry, they have many mishaps where they eat more than they're supposed to, so they need to try to get back on track, over and over again.

They hear about LC/Keto type diets, which are always offically dissed as inherently dangerous because of the high fat, high protein, "too few carbs overall, no whole grains, and not nearly enough fiber to be healthy". Even if they go rogue out of desperation and decide to try LC - they're addicted to the carbs that have been most of their diet for their entire lives, so very few can stick to it for any length of time.

Even if they're able to stick to it for a few weeks and see definite progress, then there's multiple holidays every few weeks during the year with food as the main attraction, and the traditional foods associated with those holidays are always almost all carbs. There are also vacations... with "vacation food": Seafood sandwiches from that place at the shore that has THE BEST BREAD and the BEST FRIES, favorite restaurants in a big city destination that serves THE BEST PASTA dishes and the BEST ROLLS, a visit to a part of the country that has a reputation for huge smorgasboards with the BEST DESSERTS - all the foods that that they've traditionally always eaten on vacation. Even if they've been very successful on LC, they will still make an exception for the holidays and vacations, so even if they made some progress resisting carbs before, the traditional holiday and vacation foods end up putting them right back where they started with their carb addiction. Only they're usually in a worse state, because the addiction is worse than ever, even more difficult to cut out the carbs again.

They give up on trying to lose weight in a conventional manner (or even the unconventional LC way), and the whole premise of the new weight loss drugs is that it's not a personal failing, but instead a disease where your brain forces you to overeat, and that's why you can't lose weight in a conventional way. In a way they're sort of right because there's an addiction involved - especially since they unwittingly became addicted to the carbs which have always been considered normal food. So the solution to this is to take a drug that stops that addictive behavior.

Only it doesn't really stop the addiction itself. They're still eating the same foods as they always did (unless they were used to eating a lot of fat, in which case the drug will probably make them puke), it's just that they can't eat anywhere near as much of it, and VOILA - They lose weight effortlessly! Which just reinforces the claim that it's purely a matter of CI/CO.

As far as side effects are concerned - as long as the side effects are more tolerable to them than being harassed about their weight every time they go to the Dr (or less upsetting than buying their clothes in the Plus dept, or seeing photos of themselves at such a high weight) and until the side effects cause irreparable damage to their muscles, organs, the drug induced weight loss will override the inconvenience of constant constipation, and puking when they eat too much. The hair loss might get to them though.
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  #23   ^
Old Sun, May-05-24, 08:50
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Calianna Calianna is offline
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Another company was trying to get in on the weight loss pill concept - but they've scrapped that now in favor of an injectible:

Quote:
Amgen scraps experimental weight loss pill, moves forward with injection

Amgen is scrapping an experimental weight loss pill but moving forward with an injection.
Amgen will release initial data from a mid-stage study on its injectable drug later this year, and the company is “very pleased” with the results so far.
The company has tried to take a different approach to obesity treatment than other drugmakers.

Amgen on Thursday said it will stop developing its experimental weight loss pill and instead move forward with its injectable drug and other products in development for obesity.

Amgen is among several drugmakers racing to join the red-hot weight loss drug space dominated by Novo Nordisk and Eli Lilly , which some analysts say could be worth $100 billion by the end of the decade. But the company has other opportunities to capture a slice of the market.

“Given the profile we’ve seen with [the oral drug], we will not pursue further development. Instead, in obesity, we’re differentially investing in MariTide and a number of preclinical assets,” Jay Bradner, Amgen’s chief scientific officer, said during an earnings call Thursday.

Amgen is developing an injectable obesity treatment called MariTide, which is in an ongoing midstage trial in obese or overweight adults without diabetes. The company will release initial data from that study later this year, and Bradner said Amgen is “very pleased” with the results so far.

The company said it is working with regulators to plan a late-stage trial for the treatment. Amgen said Thursday it is planning a stage two trial on the drug in diabetes treatment as well.

Amgen shares rose more than 10% in extended trading Thursday following the commentary on MariTide.

Amgen also has other drugs in development for weight management.

The drugmaker’s oral drug, called AMG-786, is the second weight loss pill to be discontinued over the past year.

Pfizer in December scrapped a twice-daily version of its obesity pill, danuglipron, after patients had a difficult time tolerating the drug in a midstage trial. The company is now developing a once-daily version of that drug.

Investors are laser-focused on Amgen’s pipeline of experimental weight loss treatments. Amgen hopes to stand out among the crowded field of potential players with a different approach.

The company’s experimental injection helps people lose weight differently from the existing injectable drugs. Much similar to Novo Nordisk’s Wegovy and Eli Lilly’s Zepbound, one part of Amgen’s treatment activates a gut hormone receptor called GLP-1 to help regulate a person’s appetite.

But while Zepbound activates a second hormone receptor called GIP, Amgen’s drug blocks it. Wegovy does not target GIP, which suppresses appetite like GLP-1, but may also improve how the body breaks down sugar and fat.

Amgen’s injectable treatment also appears to help patients keep weight off after they stop taking it based on some clinical trial data. The drugmaker is also testing its drug to be taken once a month or even less frequently, which could offer more convenience than the weekly medicines on the market.

Patients given the highest dose of Amgen’s MariTide — 420 milligrams — every month lost 14.5% of their body weight on average in just 12 weeks, according to data from the phase one trial published in February in the journal Nature Metabolism.

Amgen’s first-quarter results

Also on Thursday, Amgen reported first-quarter revenue and adjusted earnings that topped Wall Street’s expectations, partly due to products from the recently acquired Horizon Therapeutics. Here is what Amgen reported for the first quarter compared with what Wall Street was expecting, based on a survey of analysts by LSEG: Earnings

Earnings per share: $3.96 vs. $3.87 expected
Revenue: $7.45 billion vs. $7.44 billion expected

Amgen posted a net loss of $113 million, or 21 cents per share. That compares to a net income of $2.84 billion, or $5.28 per share, for the year-earlier period.

Excluding certain items, the company reported earnings of $3.96 per share.

Amgen booked $7.45 billion in revenue for the first quarter, up 22% from the same period a year ago.

That includes $914 million from Horizon Therapeutics products, including thyroid eye disease treatment Tepezza.

Excluding drugs from Horizon Therapeutics, Amgen said its product sales grew 6% from the year-earlier period. Ten products delivered double-digit volume growth during the first quarter, including cardiovascular drug Repatha, severe asthma treatment Tezspire and Blincyto, a therapy for a certain blood cancer.

Amgen slightly narrowed its full-year guidance up from the bottom on Thursday as well.

The company expects 2024 revenue of $32.5 billion to $33.8 billion. That compares to a previous guidance of $32.4 billion to $33.8 billion.

Amgen expects a full-year adjusted profit of $19 to $20.20 per share. That compares to a previous guidance of $18.90 to $20.30 per share.

Analysts surveyed by LSEG expect full-year revenue of $32.95 billion and adjusted profit of $19.48 per share.



https://www.cnbc.com/2024/05/02/amg...-injection.html
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