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  #16   ^
Old Thu, Feb-29-24, 04:37
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
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The final chapter in the Oprah and Weight Watchers Story:

Oprah Winfrey to leave board of Weight Watchers https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-68432710

She is dumping the hot potato of owning shares in WW by "donating" them.
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  #17   ^
Old Thu, Feb-29-24, 06:47
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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They want to destroy the concept that changing our diets will change our health. Even if they sway only a small percentage, that will ruin their lives as a result, and delay and obstruct medical research, which will mess with everyone, they will do it.

Unless they are stopped. Because they won't stop. They will just make it legal.
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  #18   ^
Old Thu, Feb-29-24, 08:47
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BawdyWench BawdyWench is offline
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Just a few points I'd like to make. I've never bought in to the points system from WW. That lady's apron ("Saving my points for wine") sums it all up. People I knew who were on WW would starve all day in order to indulge in some carby treat later. It's the perfect example of CICO. It doesn't matter what you eat as long as you don't go over your daily points. I had a doc once recommend WW to me because she said it really teaches you about food. Uh, nope.

I have a friend who knows nothing about nutrition or how the body processes fat, protein, and carbs. All she knows is what WW taught her. So, she accepts the way I eat (carnivore), but I know deep in her heart she thinks I have it all wrong.

Second, even if they say there's a significant loss of muscle (in one study, 7 out of every 12 pounds lost were from muscle), nobody cares! "I'm skinny for the first time in my life! Who cares if it's muscle? The weight is still gone and I can fit into a size 4 dress!"

Someone above mentioned that carbs are far easier to digest than fats and proteins. And that's a good thing, at lease when you reverse the equation and say that fats and protein are slower to digest. When I was eating low-fat in the early 90s, dry toast and celery sticks would fill me up ... for about 30 minutes, and then my appetite would go through the roof! But, prioritizing protein and having a moderate amount of fat can keep me full all day because it digests at a slower rate.

The notion that obesity is a primary cause of death is in my opinion misguided. You don't die from being fat, you die from whatever issues within your body MADE you fat. I'm not explaining this well, but Dr. Eades, Gary Taubes, and others say that obesity is secondary. Which comes first? Metabolic syndrome or obesity? Metabolic syndrome. I've actually read that women, especially, do well in old age by being about 20 pounds overweight because if they go into the hospital for an extended stay -- where they will inevitably lose weight -- they have some to spare and so don't die as quickly. It's the smaller frail women who are more at risk.
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  #19   ^
Old Fri, Mar-01-24, 19:27
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Calianna Calianna is offline
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Oprah Winfrey says she's stepping down from WeightWatchers. Its shares are cratering.

Quote:
Oprah Winfrey said she's stepping down from her role at WeightWatchers after serving on its board of directors for nine years. She also pledged to donate her financial stake in the weight-loss company to the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

Winfrey's announcement, issued late Wednesday, sent shares of WeightWatchers into a tailspin. The company's stock, which in 2021 topped $40, plunged 17% on Thursday to $3.18 in early morning trading.

Winfrey joining WeightWatchers in 2015 gave the weight-loss company a high-profile boost, with its shares more than doubling soon after the deal was announced. But in recent years, WeightWatchers and other diet companies have struggled amid a shift toward so-called GLP-1 drugs like Ozempic, which rely on hormones to control appetite and have helped people shed extra pounds.

The weight loss company, which was founded in the early 1960s, has seen its financial results deteriorate in recent years. Its revenue in 2023 tumbled almost 15% to $889.6 million from the previous year, while it lost $112 million.

Winfrey owns about 1.4% of the company's shares, or about 1.3 million shares, according to financial data provider FactSet. At today's stock price, that values her stake at about $4.1 million — a far cry from her initial investment of $43.2 million for 6.4 million shares.

The media star's decision comes after she disclosed last year that she relies on these drugs to maintain her weight. Winfrey told People magazine in December that she "released my own shame about it" and went to a doctor to get a prescription, although she didn't disclose the name of the medication she relies on. Winfrey added, "I now use it as I feel I need it, as a tool to manage not yo-yoing."

WeightWatchers, officially named WW International, last year moved into the prescription weight-loss drug business by purchasing Sequence, a telehealth provider that offers users access to GLP-1 drugs. It also debuted WeightWatchers GLP-1, a subscription program for people using that class of drugs.

In her statement, Winfrey said she will continue "to advise and collaborate with WeightWatchers and CEO Sima Sistani in elevating the conversation around recognizing obesity as a chronic condition, working to reduce stigma and advocating for health equity."

Winfrey said she's donating her shares in WeightWatchers to the National Museum of African American History and Culture, a Smithsonian institution in Washington, D.C., as she's been a long-time supporter of the organization.

In the statement, WeightWatchers said Winfrey's decision to donate her shares is partly "to eliminate any perceived conflict of interest around her taking weight loss medications."


https://www.cbsnews.com/news/oprah-...tchers-ozempic/
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  #20   ^
Old Sat, Mar-02-24, 04:26
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JEY100 JEY100 is offline
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Quote:
You don't die from being fat, you die from whatever issues within your body MADE you fat. I'm not explaining this well, but Dr. Eades, Gary Taubes, and others say that obesity is secondary. Which comes first? Metabolic syndrome or obesity? Metabolic syndrome. I've actually read that women, especially, do well in old age by being about 20 pounds overweight because if they go into the hospital for an extended stay -- where they will inevitably lose weight -- they have some to spare and so don't die as quickly. It's the smaller frail women who are more at risk.


This is where BMI is useful on a population basis, seeing that "J Curve" and the results of all-cause mortality studies indicate the increased risk over 80 is from sarcopenia and fraility…just the results the newer weight loss drugs are now creating!
BMI should not be used for an individuals medical assessment but population statistics show where the hazards increase. Women have a slightly higher risk of dying if underweight, but heart disease, the #1 killer of women, still takes a sharp rise based on obesity.

You can even see the relationship between fraility and Accidents - Falls, not transport related. "But it’s also important to note that being too lean or frail (i.e., anorexic) is not ideal. The chart in the far right shows frail people with a BMI of less than 28 are much more prone to accidents that can end their life."

"When the study authors broke the data down by age, they saw that for people under 50, the optimal BMI is around 23. As we age, the optimal BMI increases to around 25 once you’re over 80."

https://optimisingnutrition.com/what-is-a-healthy-bmi/
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  #21   ^
Old Sat, Mar-02-24, 07:56
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Quote:
The notion that obesity is a primary cause of death is in my opinion misguided. You don't die from being fat, you die from whatever issues within your body MADE you fat. I'm not explaining this well, but Dr. Eades, Gary Taubes, and others say that obesity is secondary. Which comes first? Metabolic syndrome or obesity? Metabolic syndrome. I've actually read that women, especially, do well in old age by being about 20 pounds overweight because if they go into the hospital for an extended stay -- where they will inevitably lose weight -- they have some to spare and so don't die as quickly. It's the smaller frail women who are more at risk.


100% correct

Good Health is plenty of big strong muscles and a good layer of fat, for women. Pinch an inch!!

My personal experience of sitting in a hospital bed for two weeks was great weight loss. Some fat, some muscle. Took two years to rebuild the muscle.

Muscle is precious. Easy to lose, hard to regain.
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  #22   ^
Old Sun, Mar-03-24, 15:35
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GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JEY100
The final chapter in the Oprah and Weight Watchers Story:

Oprah Winfrey to leave board of Weight Watchers https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-68432710

She is dumping the hot potato of owning shares in WW by "donating" them.

Isn’t that the equivalent to donating shares of Monsanto, the manufacturer of glyphosate-based Roundup? Although, the Monsanto shares are far more valuable . . .
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  #23   ^
Old Sun, Mar-03-24, 17:04
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Calianna Calianna is offline
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She's lost a pile of money on her original $43.2 million investment.

I'd say she's just trying to avoid losing any more money on her shares in WW. She can donate them and at least get a tax donation write-off.

(So if she's donating the actual shares instead of selling the shares first, then donating the money, that means the National Museum of African American History and Culture/Smithsonian will need to sell those shares pronto to minimize how much money they lose from the donation, since the value of the stock keeps dropping. And selling off those shares will drive the value of WW down even further)
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  #24   ^
Old Sun, Mar-10-24, 01:38
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Quote:
Weight Watchers ruled the slimming world. Now Wegovy wants its crown

The 60-year-old company is wobbling in the face of slimming drugs, wellness culture and the body-positive movement. Even Oprah is cutting ties


The Noughties were a boom time for Weight Watchers. Slimmers would gather in village halls for weekly weigh-ins, Fat Friends was on the telly and even Little Britain jumped on the bandwagon with its “Fat Fighters” parody.

But today the multibillion-pound Weight Watchers empire is tottering as weight-loss drugs, wellness culture and the rise of body positivity have ushered in a new era of fat fighting. After acknowledging in December that she uses weight-loss drugs, last week Oprah Winfrey, the face of Weight Watchers, global spokeswoman, shareholder and board member, stepped back from the brand after nearly a decade. Share prices nosedived.

“The fact that there’s a medically approved prescription for managing weight and staying healthier, in my lifetime, feels like relief, like redemption, like a gift,” she told People magazine. The scales had clearly dropped from her eyes.

Is this end for Weight Watchers? Will the arrival of weight-loss drugs kill it off?

There’s no denying the runaway success of medications such as Ozempic, which is used to treat type 2 diabetes, and Wegovy, which is used specifically for weight loss. Both are versions of the same drug: semaglutide, and they reached the mainstream last year when Jimmy Kimmel joked at the Oscars that most of the room was on Ozempic.

They were approved in Britain in September and were quickly adopted by the NHS to treat obesity and type 2 diabetes. Novo Nordisk, the Danish company that makes both drugs, is valued at $428 billion. In the last three months of 2022 there were nine million weight-loss prescriptions in the US alone. Which means that they are in danger of eating Weight Watchers’ lunch.

The Weight Watchers empire was founded in 1963 in Queens, New York, by Jean Nidetch, who’d tried every fad diet going. She invited a group of overweight friends to her flat to take matters into their own hands. The plan works by assigning points to food (based on calories), and giving you a target number of points depending on your body type and goal weight. The company quickly amassed millions of followers and slimming clubs sprung up around the world.

Weight Watchers quickly took off in Britain, too, and Sarah Ferguson became the spokeswoman for the brand in 1997. Thousands of — predominantly female — meetings took place in community centres and village halls up and down the country.

These meetings are mostly being phased out and joining is done via an app. The present cost is £10 a month for six months.

The decline of Weight Watchers began before the arrival of semaglutide. Its revenue has been dropping since 2012. The company has been unprofitable for the past two years, is saddled with $1.4 billion debt and is valued at $247 million.

The body positivity movement — which started on Instagram in 2012 — has had a hand in killing off diet culture. The brand has also lost its sheen, appearing frumpy and outdated in an age of glossy Instagram influencing. Sophisticated methods of personalising nutrition — such as the Zoe app — have also contributed to Weight Watchers’ decline.

A 2018 name change to WW, with the slogan “wellness that works”, hasn’t done much to improve the company’s fortunes.

In response to these challenges, WW axed dozens of in-person community groups during the pandemic, made thousands of redundancies in 2020, discontinued its magazine and closed its webshop last year. Content is moving online.

In another attempted pivot, last year WW paid $106 million for Sequence, a service that connects people with doctors prescribing weight-loss drugs. It also started the GLP-1 Program in the US, a diet to follow alongside weight-loss medications. It’s coming soon to the UK.

A spokesman for WW said: “Behaviour change remains the foundation for a healthy lifestyle to support positive weight health outcomes, regardless of other interventions.”

WW may be hedging its bets between drugs and diets, but health experts are nervous about how quick the uptake of these new drugs has been. “Ozempic is the new kid on the block and it’s sexy and fast — it’s a quick fix,” says the nutritionist Stephanie Moore. “It’s the difference between a needle in your bum or going to a class and being weighed by a coach.”

Some Weight Watchers followers have lamented the decline of meetings and the community spirit they engendered. Studies have shown that group dieting is moderately more effective but these clubs didn’t necessarily help most people to lose long-term weight — only 3 per cent of dieters will keep the weight off after three years. For all the hard work, obesity in Britain is at a record high and two thirds of UK adults are overweight.

And yet the jury is still out on whether weight-loss drugs are the silver bullet that many hope them to be. Moore has many clients reliant on the drugs who have not addressed their underlying problems with food, such as overeating, food addiction and eating the wrong things. They have had to up their dosage as their tolerance to semaglutide has increased. “People are getting really depressed and frustrated,” she says. “Now I’ve got all these patients on crazy levels of these drugs. Still overeating, still being out of control and no longer losing weight. It is a mess.”

Neither are the drugs cheap. Asda sells 0.25mg Wegovy injections (one month’s supply) for £169 and 2.4mg is £269.“These companies are making eye-watering amounts of money,” says Moore.

She says that rather than lament the loss of slimming clubs, we should be looking for a third solution that prioritises good nutrition and regular exercise. “We’re always going to need the traditional diet,” says Moore. “There will need to be something to fill the void because Ozempic isn’t the answer — and Weight Watchers never was.”

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/...c-era-szpwxqs3q
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  #25   ^
Old Sun, Mar-10-24, 02:49
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Quote:
And yet the jury is still out on whether weight-loss drugs are the silver bullet that many hope them to be. Moore has many clients reliant on the drugs who have not addressed their underlying problems with food, such as overeating, food addiction and eating the wrong things. They have had to up their dosage as their tolerance to semaglutide has increased. “People are getting really depressed and frustrated,” she says. “Now I’ve got all these patients on crazy levels of these drugs. Still overeating, still being out of control and no longer losing weight. It is a mess.”


And it will be. So long as people are only willing to change if they don't really change. They will spend the money and make the effort if they are promised magic.

When the real magic is how our body works when we actually work with it.
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  #26   ^
Old Sun, Mar-10-24, 10:41
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Calianna Calianna is offline
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I really do understand that the drugs give them hope against what feels like a food addiction. Been there, still wearing a lot of the evidence - and it really is a food addiction, an addiction to the wrong kinds of foods.

The problem is that so few doctors and weight loss programs will suggest anything other than cutting calories by avoiding fats, eating only minimal amounts of protein, and filling up on carbs. Even if the carbs they encourage (fruits, veggies, whole grains) supposedly have a glow of health, anyone whose metabolism has already been messed up by the addictive nature of carbs (resulting in over-consumption of carbs) can still easily kick off addictive eating patterns again while sticking to the "legal" carby foods: whole grains, fruits and veggies (especially starchy veggies and high sugar fruits).

Low carb diets of all kinds have been continually denounced as ineffective, dangerously unhealthy (especially long term), too restrictive, and simply far too difficult to stick to. It's not just the WW point system - all major diets are based on the same premise of calories in, calories out. None of them take into consideration the addictive aspect of a diet based mostly on carbs.

The weight loss drugs are the first thing on the market that takes on the food addiction problem, even though they're not calling it that. And unfortunately those drugs are also not doing anything at all to reverse the addiction - all they do is make it impossible for the patient to consume much food at all while on the drug, and often create such an aversion to meat and fats of any kind that all they can eat is the same carbs that they've been addicted to for decades, just in smaller amounts so that they end up losing weight. The addiction is still there - and will still be there when they go off the drugs.

Quote:
And it will be. So long as people are only willing to change if they don't really change. They will spend the money and make the effort if they are promised magic.

When the real magic is how our body works when we actually work with it.


Unfortunately most people don't have a clue how their body really works, and what their body really needs to work well. And a lot of them don't care - they just want to lose weight the easiest way possible.

That situation is getting worse. It doesn't much matter if WW sells weight loss drugs in conjunction with their points system, or just sticks to their points system, because with or without the weight loss drugs, it's all still based on calories in/calories out, and it doesn't matter if you "save your points for wine", or if you're eating pretzels and crackers on the drugs because you can't stomach anything else - it's still a low fat, high carb diet, and it's only a temporary weight "fix".
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  #27   ^
Old Tue, Mar-19-24, 02:49
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Quote:
Oprah Winfrey fights back tears as she reveals weight-loss battle

Broadcaster says she feels a ‘sense of hope’ and believes mocking her figure became a ‘national sport’


Oprah Winfrey fought back tears as she described how taking weight-loss drugs helped stop her “blaming” herself for being unable to control her body shape with willpower.

The broadcaster, 70, said she now feels a “sense of hope” after internalising decades of vitriol when mocking her figure was a “national sport”.

“When I tell you how many times I have blamed myself, because you think ‘I’m smart enough to figure this out’, and then to hear all along it’s you fighting your brain”, Winfrey said as she held back tears.

She added: “This is what I got for the first time after I took the medication - all these years I thought all of the people who never had to diet were just using their willpower and they were for some reason stronger than me. And now I realise y’all weren’t even thinking about the food.

“It’s not that you had the willpower you weren’t thinking about, you weren’t obsessing about it. That is the big thing I learned.”

Winfrey came under fire last year after she revealed she used an undisclosed weight-loss drug as a “maintenance tool”.

Her admission came as medication such as Ozempic has become popular, presenting a challenge to traditional weight-loss plans and dieting methods.

On Monday she hosted a TV special looking into weight-loss medication during which she discussed her own battles with losing weight.

“In my lifetime, I never dreamed that we would be talking about medicines that are providing hope for people like me who have struggled for years with being overweight or with obesity”, she said.

“I come to this conversation in the hope that we can start releasing the stigma and the shame and the judgement to stop shaming other people for being overweight, or how they choose to lose or not lose weight, and more importantly to stop shaming ourselves”, she added.

‘I took on the shame the world gave to me’

During the hour-long programme An Oprah Special: Shame, Blame and the Weight Loss Revolution, Winfrey said: “I have to say that I took on the shame that the world gave to me - for 25 years, making fun of my weight was national sport”, she added, before going on to show cruel headlines describing her as “fatter than ever”.

“In an effort to combat all the shame, I starved myself for nearly five months and then wheeled out that wagon of fat that the internet will never let me forget”, she said.

Discussing her relationship with food, Winfrey said she would think about what she would eat for lunch while she was eating breakfast.

“The difference between, for me, being on the medication is now I can eat a half a bagel and be fine... I still want the bagel, I just want less of the bagel”.

Winfrey also likened the discussion around the “disease” of obesity to those towards alcoholism in the late eighties and early nineties when sufferers were told to “just put the bottle down”.

During the episode Winfrey spoke to patients, including a teenage girl who had bariatric surgery at 13 and had been taking a weight-loss drug, as well as those who had suffered adverse side effects.

Winfrey also discussed how she had stepped down from the board of Weight Watchers because she had wanted “no perceived conflict of interest” for the special 60-minute episode.

The TV star, who has been on the board since 2015 after buying a $43 million (£34 million) stake in the company, said she will not stand for re-election in May at its shareholder meeting.

When she first revealed she was taking the weight-loss drug, Winfrey told People magazine: “I now use it as I feel I need it, as a tool to manage not yo-yoing.

“The fact that there’s a medically approved prescription for managing weight and staying healthier, in my lifetime, feels like relief, like redemption, like a gift, and not something to hide behind.”

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/us/news...ic-shame-blame/
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  #28   ^
Old Tue, Mar-19-24, 05:14
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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They have made food into something which is addicting.

When will we learn that all addictive behavior is the same? It's the behavior, not the drug! When we demonize the drug, we simply switch the addict to new behaviors which can be also problematic.

Like all the caffeine, cookies, and tobacco at AA meetings. The people who get bariatric surgery and switch from food to alcohol. Anybody quitting smoking who gains weight.

We should need the things we need. That's how we keep this carbon-based life form going. The only foods I have to restrict with my cats are the grain-based things we dispense in small amounts.

Because they are addicting and not that good for them.
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  #29   ^
Old Tue, Mar-19-24, 05:21
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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And I do feel for Oprah, 70 years old and never told she was suffering from carb addiction. Or at least, never been successfully treated.

While she is a sterling example of someone whose weight never held back her career, certainly, the problems still bite deep for all of us. Who had no idea of the odds we were facing while we ate, mostly unknowingly, cheap poison.

I knew I shouldn't make a meal of cake. I ate a pizza instead. I was tormented by hunger either way, though.

Does it matter when our breads have the same macros as our cake? When a portion of meat is battered and deep fried or grilled with butter and counted as the same? When only the meat in the hamburgers are dangerous?

Is this why they don't think it matters WHAT people eat, only how much?
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  #30   ^
Old Tue, Mar-19-24, 05:23
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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To fix a duplicate, let me add that when I look at the food a hundred years ago, and then a hundred more, it's incredible how much it has changed.

Last edited by WereBear : Tue, Mar-19-24 at 05:51. Reason: fixing duplicate
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