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  #61   ^
Old Tue, Apr-09-19, 12:31
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 11,017
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/217/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 32%
Location: Massachusetts
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Back to https://experiencelife.com/article/...than-you-think/


Quote:
The liver filters our blood, removing drugs, toxins, fats and fat-soluble waste, and disposes of these substances by depositing them in newly created bile.

Because the bile that has been absorbed in the ileum enters the bloodstream in its constituent parts, it reverts back to fats, toxins, drugs and fat-soluble waste — all the little pieces that made up the bile. The liver must again filter these components out of the bloodstream. They are added to the waste that has been newly collected from the bloodstream. The old bile, in its constituent parts, is combined with the new bile carrying its toxic load, which makes for an increasingly toxic bile that is secreted once again into the small intestine.

As long as you have adequate fiber in your diet, this doesn’t pose a problem for your body: That fiber forms a tight bond with the bile in the intestine, binding up all the harmful toxins, cholesterol and fat that it contains. Since the soluble fiber cannot be absorbed by the intestinal wall, neither can the bile attached to it. This fiber-bound bile ultimately leaves the body in a bowel movement, with its load of toxins, cholesterol and fat in tow.

But if we’re eating a fiber-poor diet, our supply of bile can become increasingly concentrated with toxins and fats as it recycles back to the liver.


Quote:
Among other problems, inadequate fiber consumption can contribute to elevated blood cholesterol levels, notes Todd Rideout, PhD, adjunct professor at the University of Manitoba and research scientist at the university’s Richardson Centre for Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals.

When bile is being properly escorted by fiber and carried out of the body by our stool, he explains, “there are fewer bile acids recycling to the liver and being stored in the gallbladder.” That means the next time we eat a meal with fat in it, the liver has to make fresh new bile. It manufactures this new bile by pulling cholesterol (one of the key components of bile) out of the blood, thereby reducing blood cholesterol levels. Under low-fiber conditions, though, that process doesn’t happen as readily, and thus cholesterol has an opportunity to increase in the bloodstream and accumulate in our arteries.


I was hoping for some research data.

Quote:
“Estrogen is made from fats. It’s an example of a fat-soluble waste that is cleared by the liver,” Hurd explains. “But if you don’t ➺ properly eliminate polluted bile, that estrogen goes back into your bloodstream, and the estrogen levels in your bloodstream mount,” she continues. “Then those estrogens can stimulate the growth of abnormal cells, which can lead to the growth of cancerous cells. And, then we have estrogen-type cancers, such as breast cancer, uterine cancer, fallopian tube cancer, ovarian cancer and vaginal cancer. Why are these cancers being stimulated? Because estrogen is stimulating their growth. Why do we have so much estrogen? Because we never threw it away via elimination when we had the chance.”
INTERESTING. My estrogens runs LOW and needs increasing; But what is NOT mentioned is the counter-action of progesterone to estrogens.
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  #62   ^
Old Tue, Apr-09-19, 12:51
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 11,704
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/136/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 120%
Location: USA
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I guess the Inuit and Maasai all died out from cancer, if this is true. So I’m skeptical.
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  #63   ^
Old Tue, Apr-09-19, 12:53
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 11,017
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/217/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 32%
Location: Massachusetts
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Quote:
But we don’t just need more fiber, experts say: We need more fiber distributed in small meals and snacks throughout the day.


At this point, Im seeing lots of holes in this theory.

Quote:
Soluble fiber: dried beans, lentils, oat bran, oatmeal, rice bran, barley, citrus fruits, strawberries and apple pulp.

Insoluble fiber: whole grains (including wheat, rye, rice, barley and most other grains), cabbage, beets, carrots, Brussels sprouts, turnips, cauliflower and apple skin.

Prebiotic fiber: legumes, wheat, barley, potatoes, rice, bananas, artichokes, onions and garlic.


This list is too generalized to be accurate. Most plants based food contain both insoluable and soluable fibers.

Quote:

Eat More Fiber — Here's How!
Here are some easy (and tasty!) ways to squeeze more fiber into your diet on a daily basis.

BREAKFAST

Throw some frozen raspberries or strawberries and a handful of greens (spinach or mixed salad greens, along with half a banana, into your smoothie.
Instead of pairing your eggs with hash browns ( potatoes listed above as good) and toast, try adding a side of black beans and salsa.
Cook up a big batch of steel-cut oats over the weekend and reheat some each morning with a little chopped-up apple.( Peeled????)
LUNCH

Seek out legume-based soups.
Look for healthy prepared salads at the grocery store that use whole grains, such as barley, and layer them over a base of mixed greens.
Eat at ethnic restaurants, such as Indian and Mexican locales, which are sure to give legumes a starring role.
DINNER

Start out dinner with a bountiful raw vegetable salad.
Replace starchy side dishes with legumes.
Sautéing some veggies? Start out with a little garlic and onion.
SNACK

Pack a small bag of nuts, such as almonds, pistachios or walnuts, or seeds, such as pumpkin seeds, in your bag or car.
Whip up a big batch of black bean dip to have on hand for tortilla chips and raw veggies.
Keep it simple: eat a piece of fruit, like an apple, orange or banana.


Rather heavy on the beans. I do question the bioavaiability of raw carrots and root vegies; I see much show up undigested at the other end of the dogs.

Well this certainly ends up a big muddled mess !!! lol

Dogs have a longer GI track since living with humans and moving from a meat based diet to a grain based diet. ( A science magazine reported this. )

I still think the plant based material needs some sever level of mastication or cooking to make it bio-available. And as we tend to not chew well, perhaps cooking is a good option.

I didnt see any addressing of the Inuits and the Massi-- and wonder how they fared with out vegies.

So I still have questions that may get answered someday.

I still think sauteeing and cooking the vegetables makes them more bioavailable; and I know popcorn is like glass going thru the GI ( per MIL specialist) and continue to look for ways to make the body less stressed....

Cellulose and lignins.......not components we can digest. So all this is still half the picture.
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  #64   ^
Old Wed, Apr-10-19, 09:44
NewRuth's Avatar
NewRuth NewRuth is offline
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Posts: 2,681
 
Plan: LC gut healing
Stats: 302/285/165 Female 5'3"
BF:Irrelevant
Progress: 12%
Location: Heartland of the USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle
At this point, Im seeing lots of holes in this theory.


Me too. Post 68 sounds like a nicely crafted story. The part about cholesterol being bad tipped me off.

Quote:
That fiber forms a tight bond with the bile in the intestine, binding up all the harmful toxins, cholesterol and fat that it contains. Since the soluble fiber cannot be absorbed by the intestinal wall, neither can the bile attached to it. This fiber-bound bile ultimately leaves the body in a bowel movement, with its load of toxins, cholesterol and fat in tow.


Just a minute! Bile helps you digest and absorb fat.

Perhaps, Experience Life shouldn't be taken as a prime source. It's too bad because I do subscribe to the magazine and have found it helpful. I'll need to start reading it more critically.
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  #65   ^
Old Wed, Apr-10-19, 09:59
NewRuth's Avatar
NewRuth NewRuth is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 2,681
 
Plan: LC gut healing
Stats: 302/285/165 Female 5'3"
BF:Irrelevant
Progress: 12%
Location: Heartland of the USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle
A part of a class lecture.

https://accessmedicine.mhmedical.co...tionid=45431412

The liver fulfills its excretory function by producing bile, a lipid-rich solution designed to promote the elimination of hydrophobic solutes.

Bile consists of a micellar solution in which bile acids, products of hepatocytes produced by the metabolism of cholesterol, form mixed micelles with phosphatidylcholine.


Thank you for posting this.

Choline plays an important role in liver health. I've read in several places that NAFLD (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease) indicates choline deficiency. Now, I understand what choline actually does for the liver.
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  #66   ^
Old Wed, Apr-10-19, 12:28
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 11,017
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/217/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 32%
Location: Massachusetts
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Glad it helped !!!

The more we can understand nutrition, the healthier we can be. IMHO there is great value in a daily multivitamin.

I try to look at everything with a critical eye-- well not try, Im just very critical, lol. I do look for the nuggets. Not everyone knows everything. I just keep stringing together the reasonable information. And I try REALLY HARD to NOT throw the baby out with the bath water.
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  #67   ^
Old Wed, Apr-10-19, 12:43
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 11,017
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/217/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 32%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WereBear
I guess the Inuit and Maasai all died out from cancer, if this is true. So I’m skeptical.


Skeptical is good!!!

Here is an idea. Assuming cancer is a new thing, due to the heavy chemical exposure, low quality foods, crowded living yada yada..... the Inuit and Maasai being tribal and isolated and eating old traditional foods ( until say 1900 for argument sake) probably didst have cancer issues as a notable cause of death.

These days I would not touch whale-- here it is removed as hazardous waste due to the high levels of toxic chemicals in the body tissue. Sadly we have polluted their seas.

Perhaps, just perhaps, there is some validity to this mopping up theory. Especially if the GI is not at peak function and fats and cholesterol are making it to the exit. And We dont actually digest everything 100%. Dairy cattle do very well, and have been studied ad nausium--- to better understand the nutritive value of different feedstuffs. We humans are NOT nearly as efficient. NOt even close.
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  #68   ^
Old Wed, Apr-10-19, 13:17
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 11,704
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/136/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 120%
Location: USA
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I don't think we can say cancer is a "new" thing. However, we do have reports (I know Taubes has citations) that the Inuit and Maasai, despite their low carb, low fiber, diets, were remarkably free of the "diseases of civilization."

Until they started eating the SAD.
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  #69   ^
Old Thu, Apr-11-19, 06:07
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 11,017
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/217/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 32%
Location: Massachusetts
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The rate of cancer is a "new" thing.
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  #70   ^
Old Thu, Apr-11-19, 06:09
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 11,017
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/217/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 32%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

https://www.gutsense.org/colonoscop...sk-factors.html

A long list of when a colonoscopy is recommended.
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