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  #76   ^
Old Fri, Feb-15-19, 15:35
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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PSA test results were---

3.1 first
2.9 follow up

Do not meet 4 level.
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  #77   ^
Old Fri, Feb-15-19, 15:38
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GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
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Good news and trending in the right direction.
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  #78   ^
Old Thu, Apr-04-19, 13:13
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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https://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb/diet-and-cancer

Quote:
Unsaturated fats in the form of vegetable oils, on the other hand, have been used to promote cancer in animal and mouse models for decades.17Unsaturated fats often contain free radicals that can produce oxidative damage after consumption, which, in some cases, can impact lethal damage upon cells or DNA. This can lead to cancer.18

This has been shown to be the case in animal studies, when a switch from saturated to unsaturated fats in mice resulted in an increase in cancer rates.19 In fact, corn oil was a favorite dietary intervention in some of the older cancer studies due to its exquisite ability to promote cancer during animal experiments.20

Furthermore, randomized studies in humans have supported this link, as multiple randomized studies revealed increases in cancer deaths and reduction in survival within groups consuming higher amounts of vegetable oil.21
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  #79   ^
Old Thu, Apr-04-19, 13:43
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
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Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/188/160 Female 5'4"
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle



Now they're pushing cotton seed oil. One of the most highly laden with pesticides. A man told me once that after feeding his cattle cotton seed, he didn't have to worm them for a year!
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  #80   ^
Old Thu, Apr-04-19, 14:03
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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That's INSANE !!!

Honestly, I ask my self " was this a food 200 years ago", and "what did it look like"?

Have stopped going to food pantries ( mostly) and stopped going to community dinners-- all SAD and a health hazard!! Far healthier to NOT eat at all.

Im really getting the sense that fasting and keto have real benefits-- we ned more studies, VERY GOOD STUDIES, not the endless mediocre stuff that is cranked out to fill the journals.
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  #81   ^
Old Mon, Apr-08-19, 06:14
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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As Im looking for answers, fell on this interview, and a section notably regarding colon cancer.

Quote:
DrMR: Absolutely. So here’s something I’d like to get your perspective on if you have done research in this area. This is something that Norm Robillard and I have been talking about doing another podcast on. And at some point, I plan on doing a pretty comprehensive literature review on this topic, and then reporting back on what we find.

But I’ve heard that the thinking that dietary fiber helps us prevent colon cancer is a bit erroneous. And it may be one of those things where the fiber is just associated, but it’s not really causal to improve colon health because maybe a lower fiber diet is associated with more processed food consumption, more trans fat. And it’s not really the fiber. It’s just the fact that a lower fiber diet is usually accompanied by pretty unhealthy foods. So do you have any thoughts with fiber and colon cancer?

KM: Yes, I do. We know there are two types of colon cancer. Genetics. Genetic. And they affect a very small minority of people, only about one percent. And most of them are dead by age 45. And then we have age-onset colon cancers. And we know that colon cancers are preceded by inflammatory conditions. For example, it’s a well-established fact that having Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis increases your chance of colon cancer by 3,000%. Incredible number!

And the death rate is not as high because 300,000 people a year go through colectomy. So those people, most likely, they wouldn’t have a colectomy, meaning the removal of their colon, surgical removal, they would die from a colon cancer.

So there is a clear cut connection between inflammation or inflammatory conditions inside the colon and the colon cancer. Odds are that we can surmise that if we will reduce the inflammation, we can then reduce the rate of colon cancers.

And what’s the simplest way to reduce the connection, to reduce inflammation is to remove all the chemical irritants from the colon. And the primary chemical irritants for the colon is high acidity and the alcohols and as a toxin, so fermentation. And fiber is a primary cause of fermentation because, if you do consume a low-fiber diet, then the remnants of food in stools are no more than 3% to 4%.

And only by adding a lot of fiber, soluble and insoluble, as well as a probiotic, that’s where you, again turn the colon into compost pile. And that’s where you get into high acidic situations and high inflammation. And that’s when earlier you mentioned the fact that people go on an elementary diet, the symptoms of IBS and Crohn’s disease improve, it’s the same connection.

So a message to everybody. Guys, girls, doctors, if you want to reduce your chance of getting non-genetic colon cancer, particularly past 50, the best way to do it is to eliminate inflammatory conditions inside your colon.


From an interview with the author of FIBER MENACE.
https://drruscio.com/why-dietary-fi...in-monastyrsky/
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  #82   ^
Old Mon, Apr-08-19, 06:22
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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From same interview-- why chewing matters. ( Funny, when I put some thought into how to prevent colon cancer, one aspect was chewing my food very well instead of inhaling. Mastication to reduce particle size, allowing the enzymes to easily attack, adding saliva to do it's job. ANd NOT drinking during a meal, maybe a sip or two.)

Quote:
If we don’t chew, we damage our teeth. We damage our stomach. We don’t produce enough of saliva. We don’t produce enough enzymes. We don’t produce enough of acids. So chewing aspect is very important. So a high-quality diet is always a balanced diet in a similar proportion of fats, natural fats preferably, animal fats in my book, carbohydrates in moderation, and proteins in moderation.

And the trick to this—people ask me, “How do you stay on a diet that is balanced and not excessive?” I said, “Well, you know, you eat in moderation. And I recommend eating only once or twice a day. And that’s what keep me going very well.
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  #83   ^
Old Mon, Apr-08-19, 07:43
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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Fiber MEnace, chapt 1

Quote:
Q. Why does fiber cause “rectal bleeding?

Doctors, nutritionists, and dietitians refer to fiber as “bulk” or “roughage,” because it makes stools rough and bulky. When large stools pass through the narrow anal canal, they may lacerate its delicate lining, and cause bleeding. Large stools and the straining needed to expel them are also behind hemorrhoidal disease and anal fissures—lacerations inside the anal canal that won‘t heal. Far more dangerous bleeding may result from ulcerative colitis, caused by the prolonged contact of undigested fiber and large stools with the colorectal mucosal membrane. Ulcerative colitis raises the risk of colorectal cancer by 3,200%. The mechanical and chemical properties of fiber and large stools are also the most likely causes of precancerous polyps.


BUT the GI specialist told me to have konsyl in OJ everyday!! ANd he was well aware of my cancer risk.
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  #84   ^
Old Mon, Apr-08-19, 07:54
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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The cause of step fathers demise, after 5 years post cancer treatment sitting in a chair not participating in life.

From Fiber MEnace the book.

Quote:
Barrett‘s esophagus (change of mucosa, precursor to cancer), dysphagia (difficulty swallowing), ulceration, bleeding, and esophageal cancer. Indirectly through the GERD, indigestible fiber is a primary causative factor behind these conditions.
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  #85   ^
Old Mon, Apr-08-19, 07:56
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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Quote:
Gastroparesis (delayed stomach emptying). The stomach‘s peristalsis and digestion are completed when specialized receptors no longer detect undigested components over 2 mm. The undigested lumps of fiber may considerably extend the duration of the gastric phase of digestion because the stomach can‘t distinguish between an undigested chunk of meat and a lump of fiber. This problem is particularly acute among older individuals, who may have weak peristaltic contractions of the stomach. The digestion can extend from the customary 4–6 hours to 10, 12, and beyond. The extended exposure of the stomach lining to digestive juices and enzymes, particularly while laying down, may cause inflammation and ulceration of the esophagus and upper stomach regions (cardia and fundus), that aren‘t as well-protected as its lower regions (antrum and pylorus). [The original meaning of gastroparesis is the paralysis (paresis) of the stomach‘s peristalsis related to nerve damage from trauma, diabetes, surgery, medication, and other causes. Today this term is broadly used as delayed stomach emptying irrespective of nerve damage – ed.]
Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). Simply speaking, GERD results from two primary factors: overloading the stomach with food and liquids, and delayed digestion (indigestion). Because indigestible fiber expands four to five times its size, it is the largest contributor to the stomach‘s overload. Absence of indigestion, heartburn, and reflux is one of the most immediate and pronounced benefits of low- or fiber-free diets.
Fiber Menace
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  #86   ^
Old Mon, Apr-08-19, 08:00
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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Step father suffered from this first. I actaully dont know what he ate beyond a cup of instant coffee black for breakfast. He worked and ate elsewhere, otherwise a few meals home cooked meals of meats, spagetti, vegies salads, bread, etc. Typical 70'2's fare. THe last 5 years depended on protein shakes as his appetite was gone.
Quote:
Hiatal (Hiatus) Hernia. The diaphragm (midriff) is a muscular membrane that separates the heart and lungs (thoracic cavity) from the digestive organs (abdominal cavity). The esophagus connects with the stomach through the esophageal hiatus—an opening in the diaphragm. A pathological protrusion (herniation) of the stomach‘s upper wall above the diaphragm through that opening is called hiatal hernia. This condition affects over 40% of the population[10] in the United States. When the stomach capacity is exceeded by food and fluids, the upward pressure created by peristalsis (at the bottom of the stomach) causes its upper walls to prolapse into the opening. Fiber is the only food that expands four to five times its original size once inside the stomach. This expansion creates strong volumetric pressure long after the meal has already been consumed. Neither proteins, nor fats, nor soluble carbohydrates can expand beyond their initial volume. A horizontal position (i.e. while lying down) is likely to contribute to herniation. You may have heard that herniation contributes to heartburn, dyspepsia, gastritis, and peptic ulcers. It isn‘t so—the hiatal hernia simply mirrors the state of the affected stomach, and these conditions are already present there, regardless of the hernia. Unless patients stop recklessly stuffing their stomachs with fiber, the majority of surgeries to remove hiatal hernias are also useless.
Fiber Menace
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  #87   ^
Old Mon, Apr-08-19, 08:56
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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Plan: atkins
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Quote:
devastating problem.
Precancerous polyps. The normal bacteria that reside in the intestinal mucosa (epithelium) provide a non-specific immune defense against external pathogens and internal cellular pathologies. Dysbacteriosis strips the epithelium of its protective properties. Mechanical abrasion from large stools (caused by fiber) and chemical damage from fermentation-related acidity (from too much fiber) contribute to cellular damage, and the formation of polyps—neoplasms (new growth of tissues) that protrude from the epithelium, and have a high risk of becoming malignant tumors.
Colon cancer. A single polyp increases the risk of colon cancer by 2.5% at 5 years, 8% at 10 years, and 24% at 20 years.[15] Ulcerative colitis alone increases the risk of colon cancer 3,200% (32 times). Both conditions—polyps and ulcerative colitis—are connected by the same common denominators, fiber and dysbacteriosis.


Fiber MEance.
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  #88   ^
Old Tue, Apr-09-19, 06:06
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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Plan: atkins
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https://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb/diet-and-cancer

[/QUOTE]The idea that certain foods, which are required for life due to their nutrients, vitamins, and energy content, may cause cancer is a difficult one to swallow.

Foods are so essential; how can we even compare them with other known carcinogens like tobacco smoke or car exhaust? You may also notice that epidemiologic studies can attempt to link certain foods and behaviors with cancer, but without a full consideration of the mechanisms, any relationship identified is difficult to support.

A food could theoretically impact our risk of cancer only if it causes a tangible change within our body that would promote an environment that is conducive to a cell becoming cancerous.

The following mechanisms describe how foods could generally cause cancer:

The food and/or cooking process could contain a carcinogen or chemical that can damage our cells or a part of the body. This repetitive damage could eventually leave this area more prone to cancer (much like repeated injury from cigarette smoke in the lining of the lungs).
The food or cooking technique could contain a chemical or free radical that damages DNA, which can lead to the expression or mutations of genes that promote cellular replication, growth, and eventually cancer.
The food or cooking technique could contain free radicals that attack our cells (either in general, or the cell membranes, DNA, or other cellular components) in a way that promotes unchecked cellular replication, the formation of a rogue cell, and eventually leads to cancer.
The food could lead to a metabolic environment that makes the induction and growth of cancer cells more favorable, like obesity or type 2 diabetes. For example, in obesity, diabetes, or a diet that promotes elevated blood glucose and insulin, normal cells may receive messages that activate cellular growth and reproduction pathways that, over time, may call for their unrestrained growth and could increase the risk of eventual conversion to a cancerous cell. Such a growth stimulus has been described as a “Hallmark of Cancer.”16
These descriptions highlight how there is a lack of mechanistic connection between diet and cancer. This is important when considering the weak evidence pointing to a possible, but inconclusive, association between dietary patterns and cancer. A lack of credible mechanistic link means a causal relationship is less likely.

Furthermore, the fact that higher fat diets seem to decrease amounts of body fat, improve type 2 diabetes and insulin sensitivity, and improve overall metabolic status, it remains unclear how saturated fats could, at the same time, increase cancer. In a healthy low-carb, high-fat diet, there is no mechanistic explanation for fat contributing to cancer. But a mixed high-fat and high-carb diet certainly could start to have some mechanistic explanation as that mixed diet can lead to increased insulin, increased adipose, increased inflammation etc.

Unsaturated fats in the form of vegetable oils, on the other hand, have been used to promote cancer in animal and mouse models for decades.17Unsaturated fats often contain free radicals that can produce oxidative damage after consumption, which, in some cases, can impact lethal damage upon cells or DNA. This can lead to cancer.18

This has been shown to be the case in animal studies, when a switch from saturated to unsaturated fats in mice resulted in an increase in cancer rates.19 In fact, corn oil was a favorite dietary intervention in some of the older cancer studies due to its exquisite ability to promote cancer during animal experiments.20

Furthermore, randomized studies in humans have supported this link, as multiple randomized studies revealed increases in cancer deaths and reduction in survival within groups consuming higher amounts of vegetable oil.21

One randomized trial in humans revealed an increase in lung cancer and a doubling of cancer-related deaths in men randomized to a high vegetable oil diet.22 The differences were of borderline significance, but began to accelerate towards the end of the trial, potentially illustrating that the onset of cancer due to a lifestyle change can take years to develop.

Vegetable oils’ possible link to cancer is a great example of the requirement to demonstrate multiple mechanisms that explain a potential cancerous impact of a food. For more information about vegetable oils, please check out our guide:

Quote:

Do fruits and vegetables fight cancer?
While red meat has had the reputation of the dangerous dietary component for the past several decades, fruits and vegetables have been the lauded darling of most modern dietary recommendations, receiving praise as an anticancer food. The studies, however, have been less consistent and do not completely confirm the impeccable reputation of fruits and vegetables.

As with red meat and most foods, the relationship between fruits and vegetables and cancer is plagued by epidemiologic studies utilizing often-inaccurate food-frequency questionnaires and all of the other issues that accompany observational associations.

For instance, smokers, heavy drinkers, and individuals who rarely exercise – all three of which are risk factors for cancer – eat fewer vegetables than nonsmokers, moderate drinkers, and those who exercise.23 Unsurprisingly, these folks are much less healthy, but we cannot be sure that it is due to diets that lack fruit and vegetables.24 Along these lines, similar studies point to a lower risk of all-cause mortality in the vegetable eaters, but again, these numbers are plagued by confounding social issues.25

When looking at all types of chronic diseases, the benefits point even more specifically to vegetables rather than fruit, but especially green, leafy vegetables.26 This more narrow anointing of certain vegetables would be consistent with potential mechanisms: green, leafy vegetables’ ability to feed bowel bacteria and the ability of cruciferous vegetables to stimulate our antioxidant defense system, along with the similar pathways that help detoxify potentially cancerous chemicals and hormones.27

Like most foods, studies are mixed, with some revealing a lower cancer risk, and others showing any difference to be minimal for the identical food. Furthermore, studies suggest that the anticancer benefit of vegetables is largest in heavy smokers and drinkers.28

From a mechanistic view this is also reasonable, as many vegetables enhance our cellular ability to detoxify potentially cancerous chemicals. In other words, these vegetables may be working hard to offset the massive damage from these individuals’ unhealthy behaviors, but the benefits are less robust or just aren’t there for the rest of us who follow a reasonably healthy lifestyle.

A meta-analysis of 26 studies assessing the risk of breast cancer in women from 1982-1997 found no benefit of fruit consumption in reducing the risk of breast cancer, while vegetables were associated with a 25% lower relative risk.29 Additionally, an analysis specifically in premenopausal women revealed a similar potential benefit with vegetables, but not fruit.30

In men, cruciferous vegetable consumption is associated with a decreased risk of prostate cancer.31

Healthy fresh fruits and vegetables heap isolated on white background

When we look at a newer study, no benefit of fruits or vegetables were seen when scientists looked at over 350,000 women and their risk of breast cancer.32 Multiple other studies echoed these findings, revealing no reduction in breast cancer or any cancer with fruit or vegetable consumption.33

Other data may suggest that when a food is eaten earlier in life it may be protective against breast cancer, but I think you are getting the point; the data is an inconsistent mess, and most studies don’t indicate any conclusive link between diet and cancer.34

When moving downstream to the gastrointestinal tract, things do not seem to clear up. Epidemiologic studies reveal a potential association with a higher risk of colon cancer in those who eat less than 1.5 servings of vegetables per day, but the association is weakly positive with a hazard ratio of just 1.65.35 Even less optimistic, a pooled analysis of 14 studies revealed no reduction in colon cancer risk seen in people who reported high fruit and vegetable consumption.36

Much like meat, the issues of the different types of vegetables and preparation of these vegetables may impact many of these studies. For instance, just as the negative impact of burnt meat may be offset by a benefit of meat consumption, the same could be possible for vegetables. Studies, however, have yet to assess this relationship, limiting data. As discussed above, randomizing individuals to a high fruit and vegetable diet did not reduce the incidence of precancerous colon polyps.37

Additionally, the type of vegetable and growing conditions can largely affect the potentially beneficial chemicals present within the vegetable. For example, organosulfurs, compounds that promote cellular detoxification and antioxidant production, are found in onions, garlic, broccoli, cabbage, and other vegetables, but amounts vary considerably between varieties.38

From a cancer standpoint, we can view vegetables as generally consisting of an array of vitamins, minerals, soluble and insoluble fiber, and an array of defensive chemicals to ward off predators. Assessing each of these components may provide some clues as to whether (and how) vegetables could decrease the risk of cancer.

In greater detail, I would suggest the following possibilities:

Fibrous material in vegetables feeds and nurtures our bowel bacteria.
Our normal bowel bacteria help to fight inflammation, detoxify potentially cancerous chemicals, and protect the lining of the bowels.39 Thus, aiding in their health could improve our health and lower the risk of cancer forming in the lining of our gastrointestinal tract.40
Bowel bacteria bind and metabolize potentially dangerous chemicals.41 For instance, the hydrocarbons in burnt food are metabolized by bowel bacteria, which may protect us from cancer.
Feeding these bowel bacteria will help to increase their presence in our gut, further potentiating the breakdown of harmful chemicals like heterocyclic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, while converting the antioxidant promoting organosulfurs in cruciferous vegetables to their cancer-fighting byproducts.42
Bowel bacteria create butyrate from the fiber in vegetables.43 Animal studies have revealed that this conversion can reduce the risk of colon cancer via apoptosis, the systematic destruction and pruning of damaged cells that can become cancerous if left unchecked.44 Studies in humans, however, are limited.
Many vegetables contain defensive chemicals like sulforaphane that work to ward off or even kill potential prey like animals and insects.
These same chemicals signal a warning sign to our cells, but instead of being fatal, simply increase our immune system and antioxidant response and also activate our detoxification systems. Animal studies have revealed the ability of sulforaphane from broccoli sprouts to block chemically-induced cancer.45 Studies in humans have revealed that cruciferous extracts can aid in the detoxification of carcinogenic tobacco smoke.46
In summary, the research evidence for vegetables being protective from cancer is minimal. Some studies may suggest that green and cruciferous vegetables provide a potential benefit, but this relationship has not been fully elucidated.

Non-starchy vegetables provide a plethora of vitamins and nutrients. When eaten as part of a diet low in simple sugars or other harmful foods, these vegetables likely contribute to our health with very little, if any, risk. Furthermore, from a purely mechanistic point of view, there are plenty of ways in which vegetables could, at least in theory, lower our risk of cancer, especially for those of us living in urban settings or polluted settings with unavoidable exposure to carcinogenic chemicals on a daily basis.

[QUOTE]

Please see DD for the entire content.

Trying to wrap my head around info that contradicts Fiber Menace. Im suspecting it is the amounts and the kinds of fiber. "Fiber" becomes a catchall, and as a catchall it really is a wide variety of types of material, and uses different microbes to process it. IMHO dropping brans and hulls fits fiber menace, while eating real fruits and veg and nuts fills the supply of other fibers.

In feed terms, fiber is lignan. Even the cattle and sheep cannot use this. At least not directly.
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  #89   ^
Old Tue, Apr-09-19, 09:01
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
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Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/188/160 Female 5'4"
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Progress: 44%
Location: Texas
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They also alkalize the body, as per Dr. Davis.

The problem as I see it is eating so many raw veggies. In the last 20-30 years we've been taught to eat raw. Cali and Broccoli for dips, carrot sticks on low-fat diets.
Jalapenos raw with seeds in Pico, salads and more salads etc...
I've even had Kale salad on several occasions and just couldn't figure out what made me sick when I now realize that Kale along with greens of several types should be cooked for a long time because they are tough to digest. People also use to use a vinager which sat on all southern tables in restaurants to shake over greens and other vegggies...why, did it help with digestion?
Now if I use canned tomatoes which are cooked, I try to find them skinned and seeded.
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  #90   ^
Old Thu, Apr-11-19, 06:01
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/217/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 32%
Location: Massachusetts
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https://www.gutsense.org/colonoscop...sk-factors.html

A long list for those that SHOULD get a colonoscopy

---

Meme, on the vinegar thing. Vinegar starts to break down the plant tissues. When I put oil and vinegar on my salad greens and leave it for several hours, the greens go limp and flat. I suspect the vinegar also aids with keeping the stomach nearer the proper pH for digestion. This is based on water diluting the acidity.


wow, that this should be m 10,000 th post is a tell.
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