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  #16   ^
Old Wed, Aug-24-16, 12:15
Robin120's Avatar
Robin120 Robin120 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 4,040
 
Plan: low carb
Stats: 171/125/145 Female 5'9
BF:
Progress: 177%
Location: DC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meme#1
Something I have read, if circulation is of concern, vitamin E really helps thin the blood. If fact if someone is going for surgery they are advised to stop taking vitamin E.

ps So glad you recovered so well Robin!!


Thanks, Meme <3
That is interesting to know about vitamin E! I actually do supplement it, to keep a fatty liver in check (it is common for diabetics on insulin to develop fatty liver time, even if they are a healthy weight ).
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  #17   ^
Old Wed, Aug-24-16, 12:24
Robin120's Avatar
Robin120 Robin120 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 4,040
 
Plan: low carb
Stats: 171/125/145 Female 5'9
BF:
Progress: 177%
Location: DC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluesinger
When I started rebounding, I just wanted to massage my lymph system. The added benefits have been "gravy." Are you able to use an electric foot massager, or are your nerves too damaged?

Compared to you, my issues are minimal, but I'm doing all I can to keep them that way.


Thank you, Bluesinger <3 And so glad you are being proactive and holistic in your own future health!
When i first sick, I did not use any massage device. The pain was just excrutiating. Even those neuro tests where they mildly buzz you with the metal thing made tears spring up. Trying to get through those appointments, with my mom too upset to leave my side in the hospital room, so trying desperately not to cry, was one of the harder things i have ever had to do.
But i was happy- because at least i WAS feeling things again. when it first started and i could see people touching me, while i felt nothing was truly terrifying.
Now, I am so well recovered i have not looked into those massagers. i just manually massage my feet when they flare, or use a bucket of warm water (i check temperature on my forearm!!!!). I am guessing you feel like they are a good option? i am worried, now that winter will be approaching before we know it!
That reminds me- i also invested in really good, plush boots. It might seem silly to wear Sorrell's in DC, but it makes a huge difference for me, and then i just change into normal footwear when i arrive at work.
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  #18   ^
Old Wed, Aug-24-16, 12:38
Robin120's Avatar
Robin120 Robin120 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 4,040
 
Plan: low carb
Stats: 171/125/145 Female 5'9
BF:
Progress: 177%
Location: DC
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Neochrone- so glad you are in recovery. I know the "chemo shuffle." For guillan barre, there is a weird little dancing movement you notice as a person recovers- the person can't feel the floor, so the food is dropped ball heel ball heel, to avoid injuring heel by slamming it hard against the ground.....

chichynea- i find the B1 more important than the B12, but i take both everyday. i find i get flare ups if i run out, so i don;t run out anymore! And yes, the yoga and balance work is great.

Merpig- thank you, but really i was just happy that i was in the BEST hospital with doctors who would protect me. It was just so scary to suddenly have all these things to rule out- stroke, MS, lime disease, brain hemmoraging....when they figured out it was GBS and 80% make a full recovery, it sounded great, compared to some other choices
Glad you are starting to recover. I used to really try and talk to myself, when the pain kicked in like you are describing. I used breath exercises at really bad times- have you tried any? They help me cope with any stressful situation, so i don't get overwhelmed.
My routine was fill bucket with warm water, check temp, place feet in (or in your case hand). practice breath exercise for several minutes. then massage area. (and usually take gabapentim).

Bonnie- overuse is a huge trigger for me, too. I have found i can do pretty punishing distances on race day, but expect a lot of pain the next day. i would not routinely train that hard anymore. Still, i can log regular moderate excercise. i just have to be mindful to avoid concrete, not run, or jump, and give myself approriate rest/recovery.
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  #19   ^
Old Wed, Aug-24-16, 13:07
bluesinger's Avatar
bluesinger bluesinger is offline
Posts: 4,011
 
Plan: Keto+IF
Stats: 170/138/140 Female 62 inches
BF:24%
Progress: 107%
Location: Nevada Desert, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin120
Thank you, Bluesinger <3 And so glad you are being proactive and holistic in your own future health!

It is much easier to be "proactive and holistic" when the condition is slight. When I first became aware of anything with my feet, it was that slight burn along the outside edge of the sole. Lots of people might not have noticed, but because of my father, I'm hyper vigilant.

That particular machine has an infrared heating option built in. Doesn't get really hot, but is supposed to encourage circulation to the area, and that is my objective. There are nobs that stick out and vibration, too. It allows the user to choose how long and how vigorous the massage is. If I feel that I need extra circulatory help, I get out that machine. Don't use it every day, but, remember, it doesn't hurt me. If it did, I would think maybe I shouldn't be using it. Does that make sense?
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  #20   ^
Old Wed, Aug-24-16, 14:37
JLx's Avatar
JLx JLx is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 2,153
 
Plan: Eat less, less often
Stats: 235/203/191 Female 66
BF:Hi wt: 276,255,235
Progress: 73%
Location: Michigan U.P., USA
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I noticed some neuropathy when I was first diagnosed with diabetes and subsequently reduced my blood sugar dramatically, which went away.

Then a year after chemo, I had it again only much worse. I didn't know it was neuropathy because it was different and it was a whole year later, until someone suggested it to me. I found some cancer support boards where people were having some success with Benfotiamine (a specific form of B1) and alpha lipoic acid.

Quote:
Benfotiamine is a lipid-soluble synthetic derivative of thiamin (vitamin B1). Compared to thiamin, however, benfotiamine has a higher rate of absorption, increased bioavailability and higher retention rates.5,7 Benfotiamine can inhibit the formation of AGEs by increasing transketolase activity in glucose metabolism.5,7 Because AGEs are suspected in many deleterious effects at the tissue and cellular level when specific receptors are activated,5 benfotiamine has been researched. In a study of 165 patients, 600 mg of benfotiamine (200 mg three times per day) showed improvement in pain symptoms8 similar to a preceding pilot study.9 Another study showed improved vibration sensation and reduced neuropathic pain after 6 weeks.10

Benfotiamine does not seem to affect glycemic control,8 and no toxicity has been reported.7 http://nurse-practitioners-and-phys...Neuropathy.aspx


In the research I did then, I concluded that dosage matters and started with 1200 mg a day. I subsequently found 1000 mg to be as effective and cut it to that to save a little money.

I took either Doctor's Best brand or Life Extension and 600mg of alpha lipoic acid also twice a day. It worked quick, within a few days. I went off it periodically and had the pain back when I did, until the last time, which was about a year later.

I still take the ALA for diabetes.

I've been having cold feet lately and some other tingling and pain. My diet is up and down in terms of carb restraint, but I'm losing weight, and I'm walking more so it doesn't quite make sense to me. If it gets worse, I'll try the Benfotiamine again.

I read the book Sugar Crush, discussed here: http://forum.lowcarber.org/showthread.php?t=473717 Some detailed discussion in the book from the podiatrist author about exactly how and why sugar "crushes" nerves.
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  #21   ^
Old Mon, Sep-05-16, 04:55
nifty55's Avatar
nifty55 nifty55 is offline
Registered Member
Posts: 96
 
Plan: Eric Westman Ketogenic
Stats: 294/220/130 Female 5' 6"
BF:plenty
Progress: 45%
Location: YORKSHIRE
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Just a thought ... are we factoring in any B12 deficiency which might contribute to neuropathy symptoms?

Everyone had a blood test?

My aches, pains, tingles and general falling-over-ness diminished spectacularly with B12 sublingual supplementation. Would that be relevant in a diabetes context?

Stella
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  #22   ^
Old Mon, Sep-05-16, 06:44
Robin120's Avatar
Robin120 Robin120 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 4,040
 
Plan: low carb
Stats: 171/125/145 Female 5'9
BF:
Progress: 177%
Location: DC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nifty55
Just a thought ... are we factoring in any B12 deficiency which might contribute to neuropathy symptoms?

Everyone had a blood test?

My aches, pains, tingles and general falling-over-ness diminished spectacularly with B12 sublingual supplementation. Would that be relevant in a diabetes context?

Stella


I have had B12 tested and it came back fine- but still Dr has me on B1 and B12 (the B12 isn't absorbed without B1 very well). the B1 made a HUGE difference when i got some injections when i first had GBS. it was powerful enough that within maybe 24 hours, there was a huge improvement in my double vision. the nerves in my eyes were still effected for a bit, but i could read the clock on the wall of my hospital room.
Now, almost 2 years later, if i start to slack (run out and miss a few doses while waiting for new bottle to arrive), i start feeling more tingling/burning in my feet.

BlueSinger- thanks for the info re: your machine. makes perfect sense. i might look into one! massing by hand helps when it's bad, so a machine with several settings could be nice.

planned to do a couple mile easy hike on saturday because forecast was terrible, so i headed out prepared for short hike/easy terrain. but it turned out to be beautiful, so i was unexpectedly on a 6.5 trail that was VERY rocky and wearing very thinly soled shoes (they help build strength in feet, but there is no cushioning, which is not great with the neuropathy).
my feet hurt at the end, but by next day, i felt totally fine
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  #23   ^
Old Mon, Sep-05-16, 17:41
Merpig's Avatar
Merpig Merpig is offline
Posts: 6,247
 
Plan: IF/Fung IDM
Stats: 375/259/175 Female 66 inches
BF:
Progress: 58%
Location: NE Florida
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still struggling with my hand and fingers now 5 weeks post-surgery. my doctor has freed me from the brace and said i'm free to use my wrist in any way i can, an this week i begin PT three times a week. we'll see how it goes. since removing the brace this past week i found my hand and palm are also swollen and numb and tingly in addition to middle finger. i do all my exercises as gest i can, try to keep hand elevated when i can, etc. but so far seeing no improvement. hand pretty weak and useless, fingers stiff and unbending in addition to swelling, numbness and tingling.
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  #24   ^
Old Mon, Sep-05-16, 18:22
MickiSue MickiSue is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 8,006
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 189/148.6/145 Female 5' 5"
BF:36%/28%/25%
Progress: 92%
Location: Twin Cities, MN
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Merpig, I got a lot of help from PT after my last adventure in fractured metatarsal. My pinky toe couldn't feel anything, and it wouldn't respond to commands to touch the floor.

For the first year after the injury, I had to do my exercises religiously, or it would start misbehaving again. But now, it's good.
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  #25   ^
Old Mon, Sep-05-16, 18:24
MickiSue MickiSue is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 8,006
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 189/148.6/145 Female 5' 5"
BF:36%/28%/25%
Progress: 92%
Location: Twin Cities, MN
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Robin, I want to thank you for your matter of fact, informative posts. Knowing the level of agony you went through, it's extra remarkable that you are able to be so helpful and precise in your descriptions of what helped and didn't.

Something tells me that you are an amazing trainer, for that reason: you can deconstruct what needs to be done, and communicate it clearly.

BTW: I missed the point where your fiance became your husband. Congratulations to both of you!
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  #26   ^
Old Mon, Sep-05-16, 18:36
Ccat69's Avatar
Ccat69 Ccat69 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 468
 
Plan: LCHF
Stats: 163/133.2/130 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 90%
Location: Upstate NY
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My husband has been suffering from neuropathy for several years now due to issues with his spine. I am concerned, because he is obese and has also has uncontrolled high blood pressure because all medications make him feel worse. He sees how well I am doing and is happy about it, but doesn't want to make changes for his health and I am worried. Does anyone have advice about how I can get him on board? He needs it a lot more than I do, but doesn't see it and won't read. Thanks.
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  #27   ^
Old Mon, Sep-05-16, 18:43
MickiSue MickiSue is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 8,006
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 189/148.6/145 Female 5' 5"
BF:36%/28%/25%
Progress: 92%
Location: Twin Cities, MN
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The only suggestion I have is to let him know how you FEEL about his health issues.

It seems like you are fearful of being a widow too young. So tell him that.

My BIL died on New Year's Eve. It was his second marriage; my sister died when she was only 50. But his wife has now buried two husbands. BIL was a wonderful person. But he was morbidly obese, T2D, had had numerous cardiac catheterizations, and, in the end, his cardiologist fired him, because he would NOT follow recommendations for eating or exercise.

You may hurt his feelings. But he's killing himself, isn't he?
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  #28   ^
Old Mon, Sep-05-16, 18:53
Ccat69's Avatar
Ccat69 Ccat69 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 468
 
Plan: LCHF
Stats: 163/133.2/130 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 90%
Location: Upstate NY
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Thanks, MickiSue. You are right. He is my second husband and I was a widow before 40 the first time. Now I am 51. It was awful and I don't want to go through it again. It's good advice. Thank you.
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  #29   ^
Old Mon, Sep-05-16, 19:35
bluesinger's Avatar
bluesinger bluesinger is offline
Posts: 4,011
 
Plan: Keto+IF
Stats: 170/138/140 Female 62 inches
BF:24%
Progress: 107%
Location: Nevada Desert, USA
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I have had three husbands. My experience is that (most) men want to ignore their health issues and don't want to talk about them. As if that will make them NOT real.

The DH I have now is stubborn x infinity. It's HIS body, HIS decision, HIS problem, as if it all has nothing to do with me.

He believes everything the cardiologist says. If a doctor says it's true, then it must be true. Makes me crazy, but I can't do anything about it.

He finally decided he wanted to lose the 20lb belly he acquired eating his regular diet and sitting all day long every day for 3 years. He is on a modified LC diet, and I'm in charge. No matter how many times I tell him he could lose the paunch in a month by going strictly LC, he doesn't listen. One of the reasons is because of my inability to lose weight. He has witnessed my being strictly LC for the past 7 years with no loss, so why should he deny himself his bread and fruit if it doesn't work? Guess I'm not a good example, but I'm all he has.

I suppose the bottom line is always the same: Until a person decides for himself to change, change doesn't happen.
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  #30   ^
Old Mon, Sep-05-16, 19:55
Ccat69's Avatar
Ccat69 Ccat69 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 468
 
Plan: LCHF
Stats: 163/133.2/130 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 90%
Location: Upstate NY
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[QUOTE=bluesinger]

I suppose the bottom line is always the same: Until a person decides for himself to change, change doesn't happen.

Very true. The challenge for me is to get him to see the truth. I always thought low carb was unhealthy. When I saw a coworker lose weight quickly a few months ago, I asked her how, then bought a book. Now, here I am. I will keep working on this
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