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  #16   ^
Old Tue, Jun-10-14, 14:50
Judynyc's Avatar
Judynyc Judynyc is offline
Attitude is a Choice
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Plan: SBD->atkins twist->paleo
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http://www.scribd.com/doc/228882657...set-and-Purpose

Dr. Holly Wyatt: Transformative Weight Loss: Mindset and Purpose

I hate to say this but I know more about maintaining my loss than this doctor ever will. Yes, exercise is very important but its not the only piece that makes it work. You can't exercise your way out of a bad diet.
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  #17   ^
Old Tue, Jun-10-14, 18:27
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Whofan Whofan is offline
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Judy, you look skinnier in each new avatar you post!
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  #18   ^
Old Wed, Jun-11-14, 07:19
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Judynyc Judynyc is offline
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Plan: SBD->atkins twist->paleo
Stats: 274/000/160 Female 5'6"
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Progress: 240%
Location: NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Whofan
Judy, you look skinnier in each new avatar you post!

Thanks!
That was taken last summer before I let my hair grow out.
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  #19   ^
Old Wed, Jul-09-14, 18:28
Judynyc's Avatar
Judynyc Judynyc is offline
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Plan: SBD->atkins twist->paleo
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Progress: 240%
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http://yebaa.com/how-to-maintain-your-weight-loss/

How to Maintain Your Weight Loss


Quote:
Once you have started losing weight, it is crucial to think of how to maintain that weight loss in the days ahead.

It may seem hard to believe, but taking the weight off is the easy part. Maintaining weight loss for good is where the real challenge lies. If you are like me, you have tried countless diets, only to gain the weight back. People lose lots of weight on diets everyday, but 95% of them gain it back because they have focused only on the weight loss. They follow the diet until they get to a particular number on the scale and then, shortly after, they go back to the old lifestyle that made them overweight in the first place. Over time, of course, the weight comes right back.

The truth is, almost everyone can lose weight but only 5% keep it off. These are the Weight Loss Registry’s figures, not mine. The WLR followed highly successful dieters and came up with seven reasons why people were able to keep the weight off.

Here are the seven reasons the dieters were successful.

1. The dieters accepted failure and kept on trying.

2. The dieters did not deny themselves–they indulged from time to time.

3. They weighed themselves often.

4. They exercised one hour a day.

5. They added little bits of activity into their daily life.

6. They followed a high carb and low fat diet.

7. They ate 5 meals a day.

When I compare my own weight loss success to the list above, I would say I learned how to maintain weight loss due to the following: I do the best I can with what I have available. Sometimes I am not always in a perfect situation with the healthiest choices, but I make do with what is there and I stick to the plan. If I make a not so healthy choice, I don’t beat myself up for it.

I eat YUMMY and whole foods. Using the finest ingredients makes the most delicious meals and has helped me stick to Living Well. If I wanted to indulge, I would make it from scratch using the healthiest ingredients possible. To me, indulging does not mean eating junk.

I use a tape measure to keep tabs on my weight and occasionally weigh myself.

I really struggle with exercising regularly and I have NEVER exercised for one hour a day consistently. I will do heavy housework and other activities around the house to get my heart rate up and I try different forms of exercise all the time because I get bored easily.

I think it is vital to get moving every day, somehow, and it doesn’t always mean you have to be in an aerobics class or on some sort of machine to get your heart rate up.

I eat organic whole foods and healthy oils. I am not sold on the idea that low fat and high carb is the way to go. High fat is not the answer either, but healthy oils are not the enemy. The rights oils will actually speed up the metabolism.

I eat only 3 meals a day and rarely snack. I do better when I don’t snack or graze on food all day. BUT, you may be different. You have to do what works best for you and your unique body.

This is the MOST IMPORTANT OF ALL: I think of the health I have now and my future health EVERYDAY. I really want to enjoy my older years and I want to be healthy. I don’t want to sit in a rocking chair, talking about all my symptoms and the things that ail me when I am in my golden years.

The Weight Loss Registry tips and my maintenance tips are not the only path for everyone, but instead are some ideas you can use to come up with your own way to keep the weight off once you have lost it.

Ultimately, I think it is crucial to focus on your health when changing over to a healthy lifestyle. So many people are in a hurry to lose weight. They spend their entire lives putting on the weight, losing the weight temporarily on diets and just wanting to get rid of it as fast as possible, not taking into consideration their state of health. I know you have heard this many times before, but if you don’t have your health, you don’t have much. Being thin will mean nothing to you if you compromise your health along the way.

Even if you are losing weight slowly, good for you! The idea here is to take off the weight and keep it off for good. Even just a couple of pounds a month adds up over the course of a year. And for those that were doing everything they could and continuing to gain weight, just stopping that weight gain is a measure of success.

With these tips, you now know how to maintain weight loss. Give yourself time to adjust to a new and healthy lifestyle and enjoy yourself along the way. A year from now your body will be thanking you for it!
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  #20   ^
Old Mon, Jul-21-14, 14:50
Judynyc's Avatar
Judynyc Judynyc is offline
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Posts: 29,974
 
Plan: SBD->atkins twist->paleo
Stats: 274/000/160 Female 5'6"
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http://holisticobesity.com/tag/weight-loss-maintenance/

Erik Hemmingsson, Ph.D., Obesity Researcher


Why is long-lasting weight loss so hard?

July 20, 2014 Weight loss maintenance Adaptive thermogenesis, Appearance, Appetite, Meta-analysis, Psychology, VLCD, Weight loss defenses, Weight loss maintenance


Quote:
Losing weight is not easy. Not at all. But keeping it off is even harder. This is not new knowledge, but it is only recently that we have started to find out why it’s so hard to keep it off. Last year, I was working with some colleagues on a meta-analysis that evaluated different strategies for keeping weight off after a period of rapid weight loss using a very low calorie diet (<1000 kcal/d). We evaluated different types of diets (low GI, high protein, and so on) and supplements, exercise and finally anti-obesity drugs.

What we found was pretty depressing: none of the strategies were very effective at helping people keep the weight off. This much we were able to conclusively prove.

This got me thinking about how the body defends against weight loss. I concluded that there are at least three types of primary defenses against weight loss, all of them powerful and hard to dodge for anyone wanting to lose weight long-term. Moreover, the defenses operate according to the rubber band principle: the more weight you lose, the more defense activation, and hence weight regain, you are likely to experience.

First, once weight loss occurs the body will increase circulation of appetite increasing hormones and peptides, such as ghrelin (increases hunger) and leptin (increases satiety). Sure, you can override this cognitively, at least for a while, but you are basically swimming upstream from now on. It’s doable, just not very easy.

The second line of defense is called adaptive thermogenesis. This means that your body goes into calorie saving mode once you have shed some weight, and you will now burn a lot fewer calories during both rest and exercise. This reduction in metabolism is a lot lower that what we would normally expect as a result of having a lighter body.

The third line of defense is behavioral relapse into old habits. Some habits are formed early in life and are manifested in the brain. By losing weight you needed to change your old eating and exercise habits and form new ones. But those “highways” in the brain didn’t just go away, they are still there. And we are indeed creatures of habit, and after a period of fighting those first two defenses, those old habits can easily make a comeback when you feel tired and stressed.

And there also appear to be more defenses, not least psychological and emotional ones. One such example is that many overweight individuals identify with having extra pounds, usually established already in childhood. This means that they are used to a looking heavier than others. Once they lose weight, some individuals will struggle to identify with their new appearance, and consciously or not, they can can feel uncomfortable and regain for that reason, no matter how much they want to appear thinner.

My suspicion is that children who grow up overweight will have a harder time losing weight that adult-onset weight gainers for this very reason, since adult-gainers do not identify with being overweight to nearly the same extent.

The highly visual nature of obesity could in fact be one of the reasons it is so hard to treat long-term, at least with current reactive methods, such as drugs, diets and exericse.

I can understand if you feel a bit depressed reading this but in order to make real progress we have to understand why we have been failing for so long. Now we at least know a bit more about what does not work and why. I say that is at least partial progress. Real tangible progress will happen when we find methods that do not trigger these defenses in the same way or perhaps even avoid them altogether.

If you feel particularly nerdy and want to read the meta-analysis we did, please see Johansson K, Neovius M, Hemmingsson E. Effects of anti-obesity drugs, diet and exercise on weight loss maintenance after a very low-calorie diet or low-calorie diet: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Am J Clin Nutr 2014;99:14-23. This paper was published open-access meaning that there is no fee for downloading it.

Erik
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  #21   ^
Old Mon, Jul-21-14, 19:57
lowcarbedd's Avatar
lowcarbedd lowcarbedd is offline
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Very Interesting..thanks for posting, Judy.
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  #22   ^
Old Thu, Aug-07-14, 15:25
Judynyc's Avatar
Judynyc Judynyc is offline
Attitude is a Choice
Posts: 29,974
 
Plan: SBD->atkins twist->paleo
Stats: 274/000/160 Female 5'6"
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Progress: 240%
Location: NYC
Default Psychological Changes following Weight Loss in Overweight and Obese Adults: A Prospec

http://www.plosone.org/article/info...al.pone.0104552



Psychological Changes following Weight Loss in Overweight and Obese Adults: A Prospective Cohort Study
Sarah E. Jackson, Andrew Steptoe, Rebecca J. Beeken, Mika Kivimaki,
Jane Wardle


This is too long to bring here so if interested, you can read at the link.
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  #23   ^
Old Thu, Oct-23-14, 15:29
Judynyc's Avatar
Judynyc Judynyc is offline
Attitude is a Choice
Posts: 29,974
 
Plan: SBD->atkins twist->paleo
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Progress: 240%
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Default Why You’re Not Losing Weight and Keeping It Off

Why You’re Not Losing Weight and Keeping It Off

http://dynamicduotraining.com/dynam...weight-keeping/

By Chris and Eric Martinez

October 2014.



Introduction

Quote:
To start this off, we will quote the National Institutes of Health Technology Assessment Conference Panel:

“Weight regain is generally the rule, with long-term follow up studies indicating that one-third to two-thirds of the weight lost is regained within 1 year and almost all is regained within 5 years.” (1)

With a show of hands in the reader’s audience, how many of you have lost weight successfully?

We are assuming a good majority of you probably have your hands up. Now, the million dollar question, how many of you have lost weight and kept it off for a significant amount of time?

Probably not as many hands rose on this question and the reason being that weight loss isn’t the problem; it’s keeping the weight off that is the major issue.

Repeated cycles of weight loss and weight regain, referred to as “weight cycling” or “yo-yo dieting” are a frequent occurrence, just ask Oprah Winfrey. All joking aside, Mann and colleagues found that the long-term outcomes of energy-restricted diets show that at least one-third of dieter’s regain more weight than they lost (2). There’s another term for this and it’s called “fat- overshooting,” more on this in the latter part of the article.

In this article, we will be discussing why you’re not losing weight and some of the metabolic adaptations to look out for and how to mitigate them, along with why you’re not keeping the weight off.



Why You’re Not Losing Weight

One of the biggest mistakes people make when entering their weight loss journey is looking at fat loss in a linear fashion.

To quote Eric Helms, “People think they have to micro-manage every meal to achieve fat loss. You have to look at the big picture which is adherence and consistency, personal preference, and energy balance. Those that try to keep insulin down at every meal, stop eating at certain times, and avoid specific foods are overlooking what matters most. You can’t micro manage everything with nutrition. You can micro manage some and what you need to, but not everything. Look at the big picture because that’s where the effects come from.” (3)

Everything Helms stated is right on point, hence choosing a weight loss diet based on personal preference. Concepts such as flexibility, personal preferences, schedules, and individualization should not be ignored. The fact of the matter is if you can’t adhere to the weight loss diet then how will you get results?

There is no such thing as the perfect nutrition program. The important question you should ask yourself is “what’s the best nutrition program that’s going to allow me to:”
1.A) Fit it into my lifestyle and schedule
2.B) Be able to adhere to it on a consistent basis
3.C) Get me my desired results

There are pros and cons to every type of nutrition program, but you must find a program where the pros outweigh the cons, makes logical sense for your lifestyle and goals, has science to back up its claims, and something you will follow on a day-to-day basis.

As soon as you look at the bigger picture and find out what type of nutrition program you can adhere to the most, you will be in a better position to successfully lose weight.



Why You’re Not Keeping the Weight Off

Dieting isn’t easy nor is it fun, but it should never be a case of suffering. On the contrary, keeping the weight off is much harder due to physiological and psychological factors. As our good friend Layne Norton likes to say “You can’t separate psychology from physiology.”

Think about when you were a kid and your parents restricted you from sweets and fun foods, you felt restricted right? What was the first thing you did once they turned their backs or you went to a friend or relatives house? You did exactly what they restricted you from doing.

Psychologically depending on the type of diet you used and the restriction it had, a good majority of the time when you are off a diet and have no goals to attain anymore you will eat more than your body can metabolize at that time and thus store fat. Dulloo et al. found that classic studies of food deprivation and refeeding showing that more weight is recovered than is lost; a phenomenon referred to as post-starvation obesity or “fat over-shooting” (4).

To support this phenomenon of fat over-shooting, Keys et al. Showed that after 12 weeks of restricted food intake, food levels were increased above the pre-starvation level, and this hyperphagic response persisted for several weeks after body weight reached the pre-starvation level, and contributed to weight overshooting mostly as fat (5).

Moreover, Fleisch et al. found that after food rationing was abandoned and products were available again in larger quantities, food consumption and body weight rose rapidly. Fat over-shooting became evident after subjects gained 14 lbs after rationing ended (6).

As you can see the individual may increase body fat beyond baseline levels, yet retain a metabolic rate that has yet to fully recover (7).

We asked Eric Trexler about the above comment and he stated “That comment represents a theoretical scenario based on the combination of a number of previous research findings. While controlled diet interventions do not typically cause substantial losses in LBM (especially when resistance training is included), it may be more pertinent in lean athletes and physique competitors, as has been demonstrated by LBM losses in recently published case studies in natural bodybuilders. Further, the “body fat overshooting” phenomenon has been described in multiple publications by Dulloo. Since LBM is more metabolically active that adipose tissue, you could theoretically surmise that body fat overshooting may lead to such a scenario where body fat is restored more rapidly than lean mass (which has been demonstrated), and metabolic rate would therefore not recover as quickly as body fat percentage (8).”



To support Trexler’s statement, we provide you with Weyer et al’s conclusion to support a repressed metabolic rate after weight regain (9):

“Six months after the subjects resumed an ad libitum diet, body weight had reverted to pre entry values, almost entirely because of an increase in fat mass. Despite the complete recovery in body weight, adjusted 24-h EE and spontaneous physical activity remained lower than predicted. These findings suggest that in lean individuals, an adaptive reduction in EE can occur not only in states of life-threatening under nutrition (such as after several months of semi starvation), but also in response to less severe energy restriction that can be sustained over years”.

As we can see in this study by Weyer and colleagues, they took 8 subjects and had them stay in a biosphere (3.15-acre enclosed glass and steel structure; self-contained ecologic mini world) for two years and they ended up having an unexpected food supply shortage and ended up losing weight. After two years of confinement they had subjects return to ad libitum diets and they ended up returning to pre-entry weight levels but gained purely fat mass along with a still suppressed metabolic rate from the years of restriction.



Metabolic Adaptations

We all know that metabolic adaptations are common occurrences from long-term and low calorie dieting. It’s a self-defense mechanism our bodies react to and it’s part of our biology (10). The imperative thing we must understand is to mitigate these adaptations and not let them run loose like a wild fire.

There is evidence to suggest that adipocyte hyperplasia may occur early in the weight regain process (11), and that repeated cycles of weight loss and regain by athletes in sports with weight classes are associated with long-term weight gain (12).

On the physiological side of things, your body makes specific adaptations when dieting. Such as (7, 10, 11, 13, 14):
•Decreased energy expenditure
•Increased metabolic efficiency
•Adaptive thermogenesis
•Reduction in adipocytes
•Increased mitochondrial efficiency
•Decreased sympathetic nervous system
•Decreased fat oxidation
•Decreased thyroid hormones (plays significant role in metabolism)
•Increased cortisol
•Increased GIP (increases food intake)
•Decreased leptin
•Decreased insulin
•Increased Ghrelin
•Increased appetite
•Increased cravings for high fat food and sugars
•Decreased satiety signals



To put this list in the correct context, the size of the energy gap determines how much of these adaptations will occur and how severe they will be, the length of being in a hypocaloric restricted diet, and the amount of fat mass and fat free mass lost will all dictate how many of these adaptations occur (15). To support this, another cool study by Knuth and colleagues demonstrated that metabolic rate was reduced by double than what was predicted based on the amount of body fat lost (16).



Some practical applications and how to mitigate theses adaptations:
•Dieting on as many calories as possible so you won’t create such a large energy gap (7)
•Train with a proper periodized training protocol to prevent loss of lean body mass and reduction in resting metabolic rate (17,18)
•Use cardio as a tool, implement it strategically throughout your weight loss phase (17)
•Manage stress levels and get sufficient sleep, this will lead to lower cortisol levels (19)
•Have a high protein diet to induce MPS at each meal, retain muscle mass, and keep satiety high (7)
•Make less aggressive cuts in calories when weight stagnates (7)
•Have a planned refeed (s) to keep leptin levels elevated and ghrelin levels decreased (7)
•Lose weight at a slow rate, 0.5-1% of bodyweight weekly (20)
•Frequent self-monitoring (i.e., pictures, measurement, weighing yourself, and tracking your daily food intake) (21)
•Do not eliminate food groups or foods, keep flexibility and variety at the forefront (22,23)
•Have balance in your life (family, fun, activities), anything non training and nutrition


Conclusions

Over one-third of lost weight tends to return within the first year, and the majority is gained back within 3 to 5 years (24).

Let’s face it, losing weight and keeping it off isn’t an easy task by any means. But if we can understand why we’re not losing the weight, why we’re not keeping it off, some of the metabolic adaptations and how to mitigate them, looking at the bigger picture in weight loss, and finally, finding a nutrition program that’s going to be sustainable and fit our life-styles, goals, and schedules then we will all be in a better position to lose fat and keep it off permanently.


I found this to be an interesting read.
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  #24   ^
Old Fri, Dec-12-14, 18:16
Judynyc's Avatar
Judynyc Judynyc is offline
Attitude is a Choice
Posts: 29,974
 
Plan: SBD->atkins twist->paleo
Stats: 274/000/160 Female 5'6"
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Progress: 240%
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Default A Look At The 10 Best “Biggest Loser” Makeovers — And If They Stuck

A Look At The 10 Best “Biggest Loser” Makeovers — And If They Stuck



https://www.yahoo.com/health/its-be...5024356052.html

This is just a part of this article that I found helpful. Some have kept it off, some not.

Quote:
Here’s how they stick to their diets and maintain long-term:

They set realistic goals.

Successful maintenance means not clamoring to get to (and sustain) the lowest weight possible. People who stay on the wagon keep their goals realistic. Cooper often asks patients what they weighed in their 20s. “This is usually a reasonable, manageable goal, where people looked and felt their best,” she says.

They eat actual meals.

Gans says she’s seen the most maintenance success in men and women who eat three meals a day, and an afternoon snack of roughly 200 calories — think a KIND bar, a piece of fruit with a single-serving cheese, or popcorn and almonds. “And we focus on the dinner plate,” she says. “A quarter should be a high-fiber carb like barley, couscous or a baked potato; a quarter should be protein like eggs, skinless chicken, beans or tofu; and half should be veggies.

They don’t count calories (but they’re aware of them).

Gans says that, while her successful clients usually don’t monitor every calorie in every bite they eat throughout the day, they’re aware of how many calories are in various foods and have a sense of when they’re overdoing it. “They’ll think, ‘Oh, this shake is 300 calories, so that’s probably too much for a snack,” she explains. “Or they’ll see their lunch is 600 calories, and know they should really be around 450.” This is all about making choices — like opting for egg whites instead of whole eggs in your omelet if you must have the feta cheese.

They do not allow changes from routines to derail them.

Cooper says one of the biggest pitfalls with weight maintenance is when a person’s healthy routine experiences a setback. “This might be a social event, a vacation, an unexpected illness, or even a bad splurge day,” she says. “This needs to be a permanent lifestyle change. You need to get right back on the wagon if something knocks you off, and not fall back to old habits after getting briefly sidetracked.”

They keep exercising.

Both Gans and Cooper say the hallmark of weight maintenance is exercise. Even if it’s just walking, movement is key. Not only are you burning calories — and likely, not eating more — during your gym time, you’re setting your body up for success. “Most who maintain their weight keep up about an hour a day,” says Cooper. “They’re rebuilding lean muscle mass, too, which will burn even more calories.”

They don’t deprive themselves.

Gans says the biggest success-buster is a mindset of deprivation. “Those who keep weight off still find a way to satisfy their cravings,” Gans insists. “If you need sweets, you find a healthier way to do it — which is maybe an ounce of dark chocolate instead of the giant Snickers bar.” Overall, she says you should be looking at around 85 percent healthy eating, with the additional 15 percent allotted for indulgences.

And lastly, lose the idea that you’re “on a diet,” says Gans. “Change how you see that word. ‘Diet’ is about maintaining your healthy eating habits, not about restricting the foods you enjoy.”


Yes, the deprivation aspect is very true!!
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  #25   ^
Old Sat, Dec-13-14, 08:29
Enomarb Enomarb is offline
MAINTAINING ON CALP
Posts: 4,816
 
Plan: CALP/CAHHP
Stats: 180/140/150 Female 65 in
BF:
Progress: 133%
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Default

thanks for posting this-
It's interesting that I pretty much do what they recommend about 1/4 protein-1/4 carb- 1/2 veggies. that's one meal a day- the rest is no carb. Plus the exercise and "a permanent lifestyle".
E
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  #26   ^
Old Tue, Dec-16-14, 16:28
Judynyc's Avatar
Judynyc Judynyc is offline
Attitude is a Choice
Posts: 29,974
 
Plan: SBD->atkins twist->paleo
Stats: 274/000/160 Female 5'6"
BF:stl/too/mch
Progress: 240%
Location: NYC
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Enomarb
thanks for posting this-
It's interesting that I pretty much do what they recommend about 1/4 protein-1/4 carb- 1/2 veggies. that's one meal a day- the rest is no carb. Plus the exercise and "a permanent lifestyle".
E

You are a star, Eno!!

Here's a new study:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/....20967/abstract

NIH working group report: Innovative research to improve maintenance of weight loss


Quote:
Objectives


The National Institutes of Health, led by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, organized a working group of experts to discuss the problem of weight regain after weight loss. A number of experts in integrative physiology and behavioral psychology were convened with the goal of merging their perspectives regarding the barriers to scientific progress and the development of novel ways to improve long-term outcomes in obesity therapeutics. The specific objectives of this working group were to: (1) identify the challenges that make maintaining a reduced weight so difficult; (2) review strategies that have been used to improve success in previous studies; and (3) recommend novel solutions that could be examined in future studies of long-term weight control.


Results


Specific barriers to successful weight loss maintenance include poor adherence to behavioral regimens and physiological adaptations that promote weight regain. A better understanding of how these behavioral and physiological barriers are related, how they vary between individuals, and how they can be overcome will lead to the development of novel strategies with improved outcomes.


Conclusions


Greater collaboration and cross-talk between physiological and behavioral researchers is needed to advance the science and develop better strategies for weight loss maintenance.
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  #27   ^
Old Wed, Apr-08-15, 16:08
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deirdra deirdra is offline
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Plan: HF/vLC/GF,CF,SF
Stats: 197/136/150 Female 66 inches
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Progress: 130%
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Angry

Quote:
Originally Posted by Whofan
Participants who used Orlistat lost a whopping 4lbs more in a year than the drug-free people.
And that 4 lbs was probably just "anal leakage".
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