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  #31   ^
Old Fri, Mar-17-06, 10:36
Hellistile's Avatar
Hellistile Hellistile is offline
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Plan: Animal-based/IF
Stats: 252/215.6/130 Female 5'4
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Progress: 30%
Location: Vancouver Island
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After that news item about the ONE woman who got ketoacidosis while doing the Atkins diet I gave up. Now whenever someone broaches diet in the office I just say "sorry can't hear you, I'm busy injecting bacon grease." I am going to become the epitomy of what the media believes an Atkins follower does. And, I'm going to implement ProfGumby's tactics of responding completely off topic. I'll let you know how that goes.

Last edited by Hellistile : Fri, Mar-17-06 at 10:41.
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  #32   ^
Old Fri, Mar-17-06, 12:39
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lynnp lynnp is offline
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Posts: 4,072
 
Plan: My Version of M/E
Stats: 284/000/140 Female 65 inches
BF:54%/49.5%/25%
Progress: 197%
Location: Rhode Island
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This article was posted on another thread, but I thought it was perfect for the m/e thread: http://www.timesonline.co.uk/articl...1809326,00.html It is called "To lose body fat, eat more steak and eggs"
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  #33   ^
Old Fri, Mar-17-06, 14:24
Jen B
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Lynn: I couldn't get the link you posted to work. Can you try it again? Thanks for the info about protein and the effect of lowfat on the health of the cells and membranes. It makes perfect sense.

I don't have any other CO recipes, but I'm definitely going to try the butter mints idea posted in the M/E thread.

Quote:
From Lynn: I love salmon raw with vinegar, soy and wasabi...yummy.
Where do you get your wasabi? Do you thin-slice the salmon or what? I've been wanting to try something like this. I think I'd have to have some pickled ginger to go with it!

Hellistile: That's great about responding off topic. I like to give people something to think about! Besides, that would pretty much render them speechless and they wouldn't have a 'come back' for it! So that would kind of 'head them off at the pass' as far as giving me unwanted warnings and advice.
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  #34   ^
Old Fri, Mar-17-06, 16:41
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lynnp lynnp is offline
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Posts: 4,072
 
Plan: My Version of M/E
Stats: 284/000/140 Female 65 inches
BF:54%/49.5%/25%
Progress: 197%
Location: Rhode Island
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Jennifer, you put the salmon in the freezer for 20 minutes or so and slice thin. I get the wasabi paste at the grocery store (stop and shop) and there are different brands. Check the Asian foods isle. I don't know why the link isn't working. Below is the article from the above link:

The Times Online (http://www.timesonline.co.uk/) October 04, 2005

Times2


To lose body fat, eat more steak and eggs
by Peta Bee

A protein-rich diet could help you to benefit more from exercise

Cook yourself steak and eggs before going to the gym — it could help you to lose more body fat, American researchers suggest.

For many years, pasta, energy bars and other high-carbohydrate foods have been the dietary staples of those looking for an immediate and long-lasting energy boost before exercise.

But a new study suggests that a protein-rich diet could help exercisers to get more out of their programme. Researchers at the University of Illinois department of nutrition science have discovered that such a diet “enhances the effectiveness of an exercise regimen” far better than the so-called “carbo-loading” usually favoured by those trying to get fitter. In the study of 48 women, published in the Journal of Nutrition, Professor Donald Layman and his colleagues found that those who replaced complex carbohydrate foods such as pasta, rice and wholemeal bread with high-protein foods such as dairy products and meat lost more body fat and had greater improvement in muscle tone.

For four months, the female subjects who took part were assigned either a high-protein or high-carbohydrate eating plan providing about 1,700 calories a day. In addition, the women were asked to follow one of two fitness programmes; either walking 30 minutes a day, five days a week, or walking the equivalent of 30 minutes every day and completing two weights sessions at the gym. Although all the women who followed the second, more demanding, workout schedule lost the same amount of weight, for those on the protein-rich diet the losses were almost totally from body fat.

In the carbohydrate group, however, one third of the weight lost came from muscle. “There’s an interactive effect when a protein-rich diet is combined with exercise and the two work together to correct body composition,” says Professor Layman. “Dieters lose more weight and they lose fat, not muscle, which is important.” The high-protein diet provided the exercisers with high levels of the essential amino acid leucine. Together with insulin, leucine stimulates protein synthesis in muscles, which keeps them strong and toned while allowing the body to burn fat.

To obtain what Layman refers to as “the metabolic advantage” of a high-protein diet, he recommends that exercisers add dairy, meat and eggs to their daily food intake while cutting down on carbohydrates, although not eliminating them completely. Healthy eating guidelines “do not provide enough leucine for adults to maintain healthy muscle”, he says. On average, a typical Western diet contains four to five grammes of leucine but “to get the effects we are seeing you would need to get nine to ten grammes a day”. The England rugby team adopted a higher protein and lower carbohydrate diet in the run-up to their victory in the 2003 Rugby World Cup. Although criticised at the time, it seems that the nutritional approach may well have contributed to the fitness levels that led to their success.

So does this signal a return to the footballers’ steak-and-egg diet of the 1970s? Jeanette Crosland, a consultant dietitian to the British Olympic Association, says that while dietary protein is known to be required to enhance the recovery of muscles after intense exercise, it should not be increased too greatly at the expense of all carbohydrate for people playing sport. “A high-carbohydrate snack along with some protein is particularly useful as an immediate pre-workout meal, ” Crosland says. But the type of carbohydrate consumed can also be influential. In two studies published recently in the International Journal of Sports Nutrition, Dr Emma Stevenson, a researcher at the University of Nottingham school of biomedical sciences, looked at how the glycemic index of a pre-workout meal affects performance.

Dr Stevenson gave athletes either a high-GI breakfast of cornflakes and milk, white bread with jam and a sports drink, or a low GI meal of muesli and milk, tinned peaches, an apple, a yoghurt and apple juice and asked them to carry out a 60-minute run three hours later. She found that the low-GI, pre-exercise meal was more beneficial in terms of improving performance.

“It promoted fat oxidation, sparing carbohydrate for use later in the run, which led to a significantly better performance.” Other studies have shown similar results. One, published in the International Journal of Sports Medicine a few years ago, found that elite cyclists who ate low-GI lentils an hour before exercise were able to keep going an average 20 minutes longer than those who ate high-GI mashed potato.

“There is plenty of evidence that eating a low-GI meal one hour before exercise can be helpful, but we have now shown that a three-hour gap offers improvements too, which means that if people eat a substantial breakfast or lunch they are set up to exercise at lunchtime or on the way home from work,” Dr Stevenson says. “It results in higher fat metabolism” — which means it will help you to lose weight as you get fit."

Last edited by lynnp : Fri, Mar-17-06 at 16:51.
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  #35   ^
Old Sat, Mar-18-06, 06:51
Jen B
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I have gleefully discovered ghee!

Ghee is the traditional Sanskrit word for clarified butter (e.g., butter that has the milk solids and water removed). Having no milk solids, ghee has a longer shelf life and can be heated to much higher temperatures than butter without burning. And, I have found, it is sinfully delicious!

I have known for quite some time that butter, and therefore ghee, is a superior form of saturated fat, and have eaten butter freely in the past. But several months ago, when I started suspecting that I had an intolerance for dairy, I cut out butter too. Boy, have I missed butter!

What I didn't know about ghee is that people with dairy intolerance can eat it. I got a clue about this when I picked up a jar at the HFS and it said "no lactose, no casein." I grabbed a jar, even though it was about $8 a pound ( ) and have been basking in glee! Eggs taste wonderful again! I can't wait to find some good lobster or crab! In the meantime, some jumbo shrimp sauteed in ghee/CO will suffice.

So now I'm going to soon try my hand at making my own ghee. I think I'm just gonna get the less expensive butter at Costco. I would think that with the solids being removed from it, it might not matter whether the butter is organic or not. Maybe I'm deluding myself here, but I think I'll take my chances. I know there's some direction on making ghee in the Paleo board, so I'll look it up when the time is right.

Speaking of dairy fat, here's something else I've incorporated in my diet: homemade half and half yogurt. I did a lot of research and found that fermenting yogurt for at least 24 hours removes all the lactose, as well as the carbs, and may even negate the casein. None of the commercial yogurts are fermented very long. I'm taking all this on faith, and have been eating 6 oz per day for a little while now with no negative results. Half and half is not only less carbs, it ups my fat. I'm looking forward to making some cheese, and using the whey to ferment some vegetables in my new fermenting crock.

Oh my homemade yogurt! Talk about creamy heaven! Every morning, I feel like I've died and gone there! This is the best yogurt I have ever tasted, bar none, Brown Cow and Stoneyfield cream top included! If I were into going commercial, I think I'd be giving these folks a run for their money!

I love yogurt. The reason I want to eat it every day (together with raw, cultured vegetables-not at the same time, mind you ) is because I have candida overgrowth and I'm using these as my probiotics. That's a whole 'nuther story, though!

Lynn: Thanks for the great article. Much food for thought!

Hellistile: How's this for a good comeback? When someone is pushing the sweets at work, just say: "No thanks. That would spoil my appetite for the lard I'm gonna eat later." I think that would make most people's eyes cross! HeHe!

Have a great fat-filled, hunger-free day, everyone!
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  #36   ^
Old Sat, Mar-18-06, 10:45
Jen B
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Quote:
Note: It is important to make ghee from cultured, unsalted, organic butter....

I hope you can favor organic butter and ghee. Because toxic chemical residues concentrate more highly in fats and oils (than in carbohydrates or protein) it's prudent to use only organic fats and oils. Currently, the one nationally available organic, cultured, unsalted butter is produced by Organic Valley. http://www.rwood.com/Articles/Ghee.htm


Well, looks like I need to rethink my statement in my post above about using any old butter to make ghee. Organic Valley butter is about $6/lb in my HFS. But it may be the way to go.

Ghee is purported to have some interesting health benefits:

Quote:
[Ghee] contains butyric acid, a fatty acid with antiviral and anti-cancer properties.

Ghee aids digestion and nutrient assimilation....

In Ayurvedic literature ghee is acclaimed for supporting self-awareness and intelligence and promoting a clear complexion and voice. Additionally, people allergic to milk protein can generally consume ghee.

Quality fats, energetically speaking, lend a sense of ease, security and of being grounded. So people who tend to be speedy and ungrounded especially appreciate the medicinal properties of soothing ghee. http://www.rwood.com/Articles/Ghee.htm


A simple looking recipe for making ghee is found here: http://www.sanatansociety.org/india...ecipes_ghee.htm I won't be following the part about consuming the solids, as I assume they would contain concentrated lactose and casein, the hard to digest stuff that I really must avoid.
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  #37   ^
Old Sat, Mar-18-06, 11:01
Jen B
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Oh wow! I just found this little gem! It is a must read. A little humor, and a lot of excellent info!

http://www.westonaprice.org/transition/fatfear.html
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  #38   ^
Old Sat, Mar-18-06, 12:32
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MissSherry MissSherry is offline
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Posts: 3,066
 
Plan: M&E Maintenance <5carbs
Stats: 170/109.5/115 Female 5'1"-5'2" w/ shoes
BF:31.1%/21.3%/19%
Progress: 110%
Location: By the beach in Florida
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This has been a wonderful thread. I am a fellow meat, egg and fat eater. Dairy very limited. I have never felt better. 60%+ of my diet is fat. I have not posted here just cause I am doing what feels good and is right for my body and really am just learning about the science behind it all.
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  #39   ^
Old Sat, Mar-18-06, 16:25
lynnp's Avatar
lynnp lynnp is offline
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Posts: 4,072
 
Plan: My Version of M/E
Stats: 284/000/140 Female 65 inches
BF:54%/49.5%/25%
Progress: 197%
Location: Rhode Island
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Great stuff Jen. How are you making your yogurt? I bought a shuttle chef so I can make it in quantity very easily. There was a thread on another forum all about yogurt and they talked about making it in a thermos. Once heated and cooled to the right temp, you add the cultures and let it sit in the thermos on the counter overnight and it ferments well and faster at the right temp longer. The cultures can fully ferment easier because the environment is right with the temp maintained...just an idea you may want to try.
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  #40   ^
Old Sun, Mar-19-06, 07:08
Jen B
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I've got a Eurocuisine yogurt maker. Instead of one container to ferment in, it has 7 little 6-oz glass jars with lids. I've got an extra set of jars so I can make 2 batches back to back and be good to go for 2 weeks (or 1 week if I let my hubby have some)!

I hadn't read about that thermos idea. I have read that you can use a heating pad. There sure are some interesting, innovative ways to make yogurt.
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  #41   ^
Old Sun, Mar-19-06, 08:41
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taming taming is offline
Still Wicked
Posts: 10,686
 
Plan: none currently (WFPB now)
Stats: 235/112/120 Female 151 cm (4.11 1/2)
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Progress: 107%
Location: Alberta, Canada
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I don't have a fear of fat, but I did have to decide, as I got close to goal, if fattier foods still should occupy as much "space" in my daily diet as they did when I began this journey. At 235 pounds, I could eat a whole lot more calories and still lose weight than I can eat and maintain my weight at 112.

My choice was to eat fewer calories from fat, and more from other foods, so these days, I am using reduced fat mayo in my tuna and not drowning anything in butter. It wasn't a sudden thing, btw, I slowly made incremental changes in my diet, and started to find that the fat that felt so essential to me as I began was less important to me over time. As that has happened, I also found that food I used to eat with a lot of fat, started to taste better to me without it--veggies in particular.

I'm not saying this to burst anyone's bubble, or decrease anyone's enthusiasm for yummy fatty stuff, but I am pretty sure that I am not the only person who ever found that over time, this has changed. I am, by no means, eating a low fat diet. But at 45% (give or take 5) it is a whole lot lower than it was when I started out.
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  #42   ^
Old Sun, Mar-19-06, 09:48
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yogamom yogamom is offline
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Posts: 255
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 150/124/100 Female 4 feet 11 inches
BF:38%/25%/20%
Progress: 52%
Location: SW Florida
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No, this makes a lot of sense to me. I am 15 lbs from goal, and rethinking what foods I want to be my staple. I still enjoy fatty foods, but can see me (when I do have cereal again) use 2%, because I prefer it. I am working towards a balance, and if my body continues to agree with me, a 35/30/35 sounds good to me. I see alot of bacon (yum) and nuts and berries in my future. I saw this journey as a pendulum swing. My induction diet of 70/20/10 was the inversion of my old WOE 10/20/70. I will never again mistake a LF HC diet as healthy, but for the long term, I may go back to Miracle Whip ( I prefer it). BTW tried Boursin w/ Crackerbread SO YUMMY! I love how great eating fat feels, and that wont change, but my ratios will, too. Congrats on making goal. That is wonderful! Your results (and others like you) make me feel so confident that this is really the safest and best way to go about WL. I have a friend who's gone from a 24 to a 16 in 1 1/2 years with just portion control and exercise. I told her yesterday (she'd been saying 12 or 10 was as small as she'd get) (she's 5'1") that a 4 or 6 is not out of her reach--I've seen so many do this on this forum. I wanted her to know that THAT kind of WL isn't an oddity. It's amazing, and fantastic, but she CAN do it.
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  #43   ^
Old Sun, Mar-19-06, 09:50
Jen B
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Taming and Dana:

I am a major proponent of listening to one's body and following instinctual or intuitional cues above all else. The fallacy comes when one looks outside oneself to the so-called 'experts' or to the group mentality for their information, and actually discredits or over-rides the all-important internal guidance system that is the true authority.

The ideal scenario, I think, is to feel and listen with the heart, moreso than the head, in our journeys through life. Sometimes there's too much analyzing, and not enough feeling. Our bodies are way more intelligent than we give them credit for, but it takes a willingness to get out of 'logic' mode long enough to feel and hear the internal whispers.

It sounds like you are in touch with your body and its cues, and this will not betray you.

We are all so very unique and different and no one plan could possibly work for all. Diversity is such a wonderful thing ...
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  #44   ^
Old Sun, Mar-19-06, 10:24
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yogamom yogamom is offline
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Posts: 255
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 150/124/100 Female 4 feet 11 inches
BF:38%/25%/20%
Progress: 52%
Location: SW Florida
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"Diversity is such a wonderful thing ..."

I agree...thanks for the affirmation.
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  #45   ^
Old Sun, Mar-19-06, 10:32
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LiveWell LiveWell is offline
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Plan: LC - 50C or less
Stats: 455/246/200 Female 5ft 9in
BF:
Progress: 82%
Location: Ohio
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I have never really been subjected to the "fat is bad" mantra. The first and only diet that has ever appealed to me was low carb. I tried it first in 98 - it was a perfect fit. Too bad I didnt stick with it and relize its not a diet but a WOL.
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