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  #16   ^
Old Sun, Nov-04-18, 06:03
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
To Good Health!
Posts: 10,609
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
Location: NC
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I've often used that Chris Kresser article to explain away my slightly high A1c but I have read other reasons mentioned in various diabetes articles, like this one. Not a perfect marker for many reasons.https://blog.designsforhealth.com/hemoglobin-a1c

In my mind it is another blood marker that as long as it is in/near range, as my doctor explains, it means that "MY Normal" in my lab runs higher within their range. It may be influenced by my LC diet or for no particular reason. My lab uses 5.6 as the cut off for "normal" and 6.4 for diabetes. In the past 5 years, tests have been 5.6,5.7,5.9,5.8,5.8 and recent 5.1 (no idea why, but not concerned either way it goes if it stays near my average).

At the same time this blood is drawn for standard lab tests, another is run through an on-site machine for all the blood markers usually checked before a chemo infusion. Most recent test, the oncologist surprised me by saying I have the healthiest blood in his entire practice, whatever that means He plotted the WBC (total breakdown was over 100%), RBC (mid-high), hemoglobin and hemocrit. All mid-range but together the total pattern was considered very healthy to his brilliant mind. If it weren't for an annual cancer check-up, I would be like Jean and not get any blood tests anymore. I haven't been to the GP or Dr. Westman since I turned 65 three years ago, the oncologist visit is more than enough.
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  #17   ^
Old Sun, Nov-04-18, 06:34
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 9,250
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/217/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 32%
Location: Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LCer4Life
Ms Arielle, I lived at 6500 feet and my RBC count was always higher than the ‘range’. I’d have to explain to Drs.


That would make sense , to me. You would think docs would know. (Shaking head)
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  #18   ^
Old Sun, Nov-04-18, 06:38
cotonpal's Avatar
cotonpal cotonpal is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 4,196
 
Plan: very low carb real food
Stats: 245/128/135 Female 62
BF:
Progress: 106%
Location: Vermont
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Thanks Janet for the endorsement on my somewhat unorthodox method when it comes to blood tests. I figure that if I am eating according to what I have figured out works for me, that is keeps my weight stable and in an acceptable range, then there's no reason to consult a doctor or get my blood tested. If I had had cancer I would see an oncologist at the prescribed intervals and do the recommended testing but since all seems well I see no need to get a bunch of blood testing done. What I told my doctor is that since I don't plan to change the way I eat or to take prescription drugs without clear evidence of the need, there is no reason to get blood testing done. I suspect she doesn't completely agree with me but she knows I'm firm in this regard and she can't argue with my success. I'm turning 70 next month. My decade+ abstention from blood tests, apart from the testing I have done myself on occasion for bg and Hba1c and vitamin D, does not seem to have done me any harm and maybe has saved me from the iatrogenic effects of doctor suggested treatment.
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  #19   ^
Old Sun, Nov-04-18, 06:48
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 9,250
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/217/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 32%
Location: Massachusetts
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Janet, a panel of tests seems to be more valuable than just one test.

When looking for more info/tests, Vita used a panel of 10 tests and in a study the LDL increased but all others decreased.

As for the A1c perhaps C reactive protein test has value too. I'm working toward a lower level of Inflammation in the body and prevention of related diseases, like cancer.

Have given up on oncologists to help with prevention. Glad u have the support ; my mom loves her oncologist too.
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  #20   ^
Old Sun, Nov-04-18, 07:02
bluesinger's Avatar
bluesinger bluesinger is offline
Posts: 3,715
 
Plan: LCHF
Stats: 170/139/139 Female 62 inches
BF:22%
Progress: 100%
Location: Nevada Desert, USA
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Jean, thanks for the new word to add to my vocabulary. I like what I found when asking Dr. Google his opinion.
Quote:
Social and cultural iatrogenesis

The 20th-century social critic Ivan Illich broadened the concept of medical iatrogenesis in his 1974 book Medical Nemesis: The Expropriation of Health.

...clinical iatrogenesis is the injury done to patients by ineffective, unsafe, and erroneous treatments as described. In this regard, he described the need for evidence-based medicine 20 years before the term was coined.

... social iatrogenesis is the medicalization of life in which medical professionals, pharmaceutical companies, and medical device companies have a vested interest in sponsoring sickness by creating unrealistic health demands that require more treatments or treating non-diseases that are part of the normal human experience, such as age-related declines. In this way, aspects of medical practice and medical industries can produce social harm in which society members ultimately become less healthy or excessively dependent on institutional care. He argued that medical education of physicians contributes to medicalization of society because they are trained predominantly for diagnosing and treating illness, therefore they focus on disease rather than on health.

...cultural iatrogenesis refers to the destruction of traditional ways of dealing with, and making sense of, death, suffering, and sickness. In this way the medicalization of life leads to cultural harm as society members lose their autonomous coping skills. It is worth noting that in these critiques "Illich does not reject all benefits of modern society but rejects those that involve unwarranted dependency and exploitation."
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