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  #1   ^
Old Tue, Dec-04-18, 20:44
mike_d's Avatar
mike_d mike_d is offline
Grease is the word!
Posts: 8,362
 
Plan: PSMF/IF
Stats: 236/181/180 Male 72 inches
BF:disappearing!
Progress: 98%
Location: Alamo city, Texas
Lightbulb Wagyu Beef

Quote:
Not only is it a gastronomic delight, but its healthy for you too. Health experts have discovered the mono-unsaturated to saturated fat ratio is higher in Wagyu than in other beef and, the saturated fat contained in Wagyu is different. Forty percent is in a version called stearic acid, which is regarded as having a minimal impact in raising cholesterol levels. The profile of marbled Wagyu beef is more beneficial and healthier to human health.

Wagyu is also higher in a type of fatty acid called conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). Wagyu beef contain the highest amount of CLA per gram of any foodstuff about 30% more than other beef breeds due to higher linoleic acid levels. Foods that are naturally high in CLA have fewer negative health effects.
http://wagyu.org/breed-info/what-is-wagyu/

Why pay for Kobe?

https://jesspryles.com/what-is-wagyu-beef/

Wet or dry aged beef? I prefer to pay a bit more for dry, or dry age it in the fridge.
Quote:
The biggest difference between the wet and dry aging methods is while both have an effect on tenderness, only dry aging intensifies flavor.
https://jesspryles.com/dry-aging/

Native Americans used to float bloated buffalo down a river then consume the meat. The women sometimes cut open the udder to drink the milk. Grass fed of course

I have seen skirt steak "Fajita" that comes close to wagyu, at least in the marbling. It's pricey, $7 to $11 a pound at the local Mexican Market.

Last edited by mike_d : Tue, Dec-04-18 at 23:04.
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  #2   ^
Old Wed, Dec-12-18, 18:37
ID4 ID4 is offline
Registered Member
Posts: 56
 
Plan: VLC
Stats: 158/150/150 Male 69 inches
BF:
Progress: 100%
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Too pricey. Personally I am not a fan of monounsaturated fat ... I would like to be convinced it's something I should seek out. Just call me Scrooge McDuck. I'm skeptical of this 'fancy beef.' Bah, humbug.
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  #3   ^
Old Wed, Dec-12-18, 21:50
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is online now
Posts: 9,421
 
Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/188/160 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 44%
Location: Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ID4
Too pricey. Personally I am not a fan of monounsaturated fat ... I would like to be convinced it's something I should seek out. Just call me Scrooge McDuck. I'm skeptical of this 'fancy beef.' Bah, humbug.



Read those links which have a lot of info.
I learned a lot about it.
It does say that it is used as small slices and not a huge steak as many assume.
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  #4   ^
Old Thu, Dec-13-18, 08:03
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 9,235
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/217/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 32%
Location: Massachusetts
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One of the areas we learn about in Ag school is that not every breed of cattle is the same. In the supermarket, everything is commercialized into Angus or not Angus. Like ANgus is the king of the cattle industry. A friend that raises cattle told me that any black animal is sold as Angus, even if it is not, or only partial. A sales ploy surely.

Years ago we had a different style hog. A lard hog. They were all VERY fat. Fat we hard working farming people needed for energy and overallhealth. About 100 years ago, the demand was for leaner hogs, and the result is todays leaner profile. Think Potbelly pig for an idea of the old style lard hogs.

Our food is our medicine. And right now the commericial food is usually what is killing us. Eating animals produced as they were meant to be is much healthier for both them and us.

Cattle are too big for me to handle; I stick to sheep.
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  #5   ^
Old Yesterday, 20:08
Gypsybyrd's Avatar
Gypsybyrd Gypsybyrd is offline
Posts: 5,939
 
Plan: Atkins '72 It works best!
Stats: 270/232.5/160 Female 5'3"
BF:mini goal 229
Progress: 34%
Location: St. Pete, Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle
One of the areas we learn about in Ag school is that not every breed of cattle is the same. In the supermarket, everything is commercialized into Angus or not Angus. Like ANgus is the king of the cattle industry. A friend that raises cattle told me that any black animal is sold as Angus, even if it is not, or only partial. A sales ploy surely.

Years ago we had a different style hog. A lard hog. They were all VERY fat. Fat we hard working farming people needed for energy and overallhealth. About 100 years ago, the demand was for leaner hogs, and the result is todays leaner profile. Think Potbelly pig for an idea of the old style lard hogs.

Our food is our medicine. And right now the commericial food is usually what is killing us. Eating animals produced as they were meant to be is much healthier for both them and us.

Cattle are too big for me to handle; I stick to sheep.


There was a farmer in Iowa (I think) that was raising fat pigs - the old style. Swabian Hall pigs. Link to article

From the article:
Quote:
The pork from this type of pig is fattier, the meat is juicer, and its colored deep red, not a whiter color like most mass produced pork
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  #6   ^
Old Today, 07:33
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 9,235
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/217/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 32%
Location: Massachusetts
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https://www.foxnews.com/food-drink/...-american-pig-- Very nice!!!! There are a number of old hog breeds still around. A growing intereste in them keeps the prices rather high for breeding stock. During the time I was interested, I did a lit of reading and talked to the fellow in the link below. He was honest, hogs get rather big and can be dangerous. Not to be thought of as a pet.

Having raised a couple hogs one summer, I decided hogs were not for me.

Here is is farm blog. Not a secured site, but a wonderful daily post about the ins and outs of raising a new breed of hog that he has developed to live pasture raised. How he works and selects for those that sill not root into the pasture. The planting of fruits trees for drops as fall food. A plot of pumpkin that is demolished in a couple days and the years of building their own facility to handle only their own hogs...... his sows know him and they give birth in a huge igloo like structure where the sow can tend her babies in peace with their own little paddock.


http://sugarmtnfarm.com/
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