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  #1   ^
Old Tue, Dec-11-18, 09:58
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
To Good Health!
Posts: 11,171
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
Location: NC
Default The Fat Kitchen

From our local independent bookstore, via Shelf Awareness newsletter. I haven't seen it myself, somewhat stunned it is a recommended holiday cookbook :

The Fat Kitchen: How to Render, Cure and Cook with Lard, Tallow and Poultry Fat
by Andrea Chesman


Andrea Chesman (The Backyard Homestead Book of Kitchen Know-How) has created a surprisingly beautiful cookbook in The Fat Kitchen: How to Render, Cure and Cook with Lard, Tallow and Poultry Fat. It begins somewhat unusually, with a chapter on the chemistry and biology of animal fats and why--probably to the surprise of many Americans--they may be healthier than many vegetable fats. For example, when vegetable seed oil is heated in a deep-fryer, it releases aldehydes (linked to cancer and dementia). According to Chesman, repeated frying in any kind of vegetable oil makes food increasingly contaminated. Animal fats, however, can safely be re-used several times for frying.

The Fat Kitchen is full of information on which fats come from which parts of animals, how to render them at home (or where to buy them) and how to store and use them properly. But the real showpiece of The Fat Kitchen is its many delectable recipes. Each one includes gorgeous photos, detailed instructions and tips on how to best incorporate fats. And the recipes themselves will have readers salivating, including Onion Confit and Chorizo-Cheese Empanadas; Curried Beef Pasties in the savory section; and Amish Potato Buns, Jelly Doughnuts and Blueberry Galette in the sweets. Any home cook wanting to avoid processed oils, as well as anyone hoping for more tender baked goods and tasty main dishes, is sure to enjoy The Fat Kitchen. --Jessica Howard, bookseller at Bookmans, Tucson, Ariz.

Discover: This beautiful cookbook includes recipes and methods for rendering and cooking with animal fats.
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  #2   ^
Old Tue, Dec-11-18, 10:09
cotonpal's Avatar
cotonpal cotonpal is online now
Posts: 4,536
 
Plan: very low carb real food
Stats: 245/128/135 Female 62
BF:
Progress: 106%
Location: Vermont
Default

Many many years ago I made sauerbraten using a recipe from the New York Times Cookbook. I had to buy a larding needle to inject the meat with lard and flavoring to tenderize and flavor the meat. No doubt this recipe has been out of style for a while. Maybe it's time to give it a try again although I would have to buy a new larding needle since mine disappeared decades ago. If memory serves me right it was delicious.
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  #3   ^
Old Tue, Dec-11-18, 10:24
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
To Good Health!
Posts: 11,171
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
Location: NC
Default

Larding Needle...never heard of it but will check next time in a kitchen store. I won't get this book because of all the pastry recipes, but the title alone grabbed my attention. The bookshop that sent this newsletter is the same one where Dr. Westman did an author event for the New Atkins book...and the rest is history.
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  #4   ^
Old Tue, Dec-11-18, 12:26
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is online now
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Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/188/160 Female 5'4"
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Location: Texas
Default

That sounds like an interesting book Janet, are you going to buy it? I've always been interested in how they make confit (sp) in France. Meat in a terrine completely covered in fat.
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  #5   ^
Old Wed, Dec-12-18, 03:22
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
To Good Health!
Posts: 11,171
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
Location: NC
Default

I doubt Iíll buy it due to all the pastry (my Austrian grandmother used lard for her pie crusts) but will definitely take a trip to this bookshop to look at photos and ideas embracing animal fat. It is in the nearby county with increasing acreage of sustainable farms, raising heritage pigs, pastured eggs. Though Shelf Awareness is a national book newsletter contracted by the small independents, and this reviewer is in Tucson, so embracing fat is in everywhere.
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  #6   ^
Old Wed, Dec-12-18, 13:05
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/214/153 Female 5'8"
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Default

I make pastry dough using almond flour now. Still not LC. But my kids will eat it.

I have made cracklings of beef fat, keeping the rendered fat in freezer, and salt the cracklings. Or add it to stews and the like to get more calories into my teens.

When we butcher the chickens it is interesting to see which have laid on more fat than the others. I tuck the extra yellow globs into the cavity when roasting.

THe fats will have different flavors based on what the animal has been eating. The richest flavors are from older roosters that have free roaming rights around my farm.

I buy beef fat trimmings from a local butcher. It took lots of phone calls and bothering the butcher departments to find a source willing to sell me fat trimmings.
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  #7   ^
Old Mon, Dec-17-18, 05:52
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
To Good Health!
Posts: 11,171
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
Location: NC
Default

Adding the reasons not to use vegetable oils https://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb/vegetable-oils
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  #8   ^
Old Sat, Dec-22-18, 08:56
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is offline
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Plan: mostly milkfat
Stats: 190/152.4/154 Male 67inches
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Default

More like suspected reasons. Pretty clear in that article that the science is undecided. In the meantime, I mostly avoid vegetable oil because it tastes yucky. But no longer stare at the ceiling at night wondering just how much linoleic acid I got from my pork chop.
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  #9   ^
Old Sat, Dec-22-18, 10:35
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is online now
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Plan: Atkins DANDR
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JEY100
I doubt Iíll buy it due to all the pastry (my Austrian grandmother used lard for her pie crusts)


I was thinking they used lard or tallow since butter might have been a luxury unless you had a dairy farm with an abundance of it.
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  #10   ^
Old Sun, Dec-23-18, 04:12
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
To Good Health!
Posts: 11,171
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
Location: NC
Default

Both sets of grandparents had dairy farms, but lard was used for flakiness and in the case of strudel, stretchiness. My Austrian grandma used the entire kitchen table and pulling it thin enough to see through, the photo in this lard article shows a strudel being rolled up just as I remember. http://www.motherlindas.com/lard.htm Another memory is Christmas goose swimming in a pan of fat. No fear of fat there, yet my mother made pie crusts with Crisco ( or Fluffo, a Crisco with some added yellow dye poison ) The campaign to convince people that vegetable shortening was better was incredibly effective.
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  #11   ^
Old Sun, Dec-23-18, 05:28
cotonpal's Avatar
cotonpal cotonpal is online now
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Plan: very low carb real food
Stats: 245/128/135 Female 62
BF:
Progress: 106%
Location: Vermont
Default

Crisco was what my mother used but I grew up in a kosher home so lard, being from pork, was not allowed. I wonder what was used before crisco, butter?
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  #12   ^
Old Sun, Dec-23-18, 13:53
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is online now
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Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/188/160 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 44%
Location: Texas
Default

My mother never would buy Crisco or chips or Coke.....She once bought a very small can of crisco (because of advertising pressure) which sat for a long time and at about 10 yo I thought it was cream so I tasted it
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  #13   ^
Old Sun, Dec-23-18, 20:40
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bluesinger bluesinger is offline
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Plan: Atkins 72~Induction
Stats: 170/140/140 Female 62 inches
BF:24%
Progress: 100%
Location: Nevada Desert, USA
Default

My family home was in Texas, and I ate the Texas way until I left at age 19. That was in 1964. We were poor.

Mother used Crisco for frying. I don't think we ever had butter, just margarine. No oils, all salad dressing (french) from a bottle. No snacks. Canned tuna and Miracle Whip.

No desserts. But a gallon of syrupy iced tea in the fridge at all times. If we had fruit at all it came from cans and we had peaches with evap milk and sugar. Sometimes in the summertime we had watermelon.

Back then, there were few fast food places and we couldn't really afford to eat there anyway.

Breaded and fried meat. Hamburger stretched with noodles. Pinto beans. Mashed potatoes and gravy. White bread. Some milk. Canned vegetables and sometimes a tiny bowl of salad for 5 people. Repeated every week.

We didn't eat very much.

Last edited by bluesinger : Sun, Dec-23-18 at 20:45.
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  #14   ^
Old Mon, Dec-24-18, 10:33
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/214/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 40%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

Many fats are available : beef, chicken, duck....

Frying in 2 inches of oil/fat I now understand is for the rich. THose overflowing with abundance. An extra well fed chicken can produce a remarkable amount of lovely yellow fat. Same with a duck. Even our sheep always have a good amount of fat.

While rethinking fats, how much do we really need for optimal nutrition??? THat amount, respectfully, depends on the availability of fats and chosen macros.

As I looked at the abundance of food on the sideboard for apeetizers, I pondered about the excess number of people to feed in this world and the overall lack of food reaching every one..... and often poor quality food at that. We have stretched the current food system to the breaking point: low quality foods has become the norm AND too many people without adequate calories on a daily basis.......
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  #15   ^
Old Fri, Jan-04-19, 01:55
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is online now
Posts: 10,836
 
Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/188/160 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 44%
Location: Texas
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JEY100
Both sets of grandparents had dairy farms, but lard was used for flakiness and in the case of strudel, stretchiness. My Austrian grandma used the entire kitchen table and pulling it thin enough to see through, the photo in this lard article shows a strudel being rolled up just as I remember. http://www.motherlindas.com/lard.htm Another memory is Christmas goose swimming in a pan of fat. No fear of fat there, yet my mother made pie crusts with Crisco ( or Fluffo, a Crisco with some added yellow dye poison ) The campaign to convince people that vegetable shortening was better was incredibly effective.


Love that web-site and I also love goose!

I'm going to cook this!
http://www.motherlindas.com/sitas_pork_cabbage.htm

Last edited by Meme#1 : Fri, Jan-04-19 at 02:07.
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