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  #1   ^
Old Sat, Nov-17-18, 05:46
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Demi Demi is offline
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Default Weight lifting better for heart health than running, new study finds

Quote:
From The Telegraph
London, UK
16 November, 2018

Weight lifting better for heart health than running, new study finds

Lifting weights is healthier for the heart than going for a run or a walk, new research has found.

Scientists looking at the health records of more than 4,000 people have concluded that, while both forms of exercise reduce the risk of developing heart disease, static activities such as weight lifting or press-ups have a greater effect than an equivalent amount of dynamic exercise such as running, walking or cycling.

The research challenges commonly held assumption that so-called “cardiovascular” pursuits like running are of greatest benefit to the heart.
However, it backs up previous studies which suggest that heavy static exercise gives the circulatory system a better workout because the oxygen expenditure is more intense.

The Chief Medical Officer for England recommends that adults take part in at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity each week, comprising a mixture of dynamic and static activity.

Professor Dr Maia Smith, who led the research at St George's University, Grenada, said: "Both strength training and aerobic activity appeared to be heart healthy, even in small amounts, at the population level.

"Clinicians should counsel patients to exercise regardless - both activity types were beneficial.

"However, static activity appeared more beneficial than dynamic, and patients who did both types of physical activity fared better than patients who simply increased the level of one type of activity."

Researchers analysed cardiovascular risk factors, such as high blood pressure, overweight, diabetes and high cholesterol, as a function of self-reported static and/or dynamic activity in 4,086 American adults.
They took part in the 2005 to 2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

The researchers then adjusted for age, ethnicity, gender and smoking and stratified by age, 21 to 44 years old or over 45.

In total, 36 per cent of younger and 25 per cent of older adults engaged in static activity, and 28 per cent of younger and 21 per cent of older adults engaged in dynamic activity.

Researchers found engaging in either type of activity was associated with 30 to 70 per cent lower rates of cardiovascular disease risk factors, but associations were strongest for static activity and in youth.

Prof Smith said: "One interesting takeaway was that both static and dynamic activity were almost as popular in older people as younger.

"I believe this gives clinicians the opportunity to counsel their older patients that they will fit into the gym or the road race just fine.

"The important thing is to make sure they are engaging in physical activity."
The research was presented at the American College of Cardiology Latin America Conference 2018 in Lima, Peru.



https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science...ew-study-finds/
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  #2   ^
Old Sat, Jul-06-19, 00:23
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Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 22,395
 
Plan: LCHF/IF
Stats: 217/000/160 Female 5'10"
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Quote:
July 5, 2019

Weightlifting better at reducing heart fat than aerobic exercise

Obese people who engaged in resistance training were more likely to see reductions in a type of heart fat that has been linked to cardiovascular disease, a new study finds.


In the small study, researchers determined that a certain type of heart fat, pericardial adipose tissue, was reduced in patients who did weight lifting, but not in those who worked on increasing their endurance with aerobic exercise, according to a report published in JAMA Cardiology. Both forms of exercise resulted in the reduction of a second type of heart fat, epicardial adipose tissue, which has also been linked with heart disease.

“We were surprised by this finding,” said the study’s lead author, Dr. Regitse Hojgaard Christensen, a researcher at the Center of Inflammation and Metabolism and the Center for Physical Activity Research at the Copenhagen University Hospital.

While the study doesn’t explain why weight training would have a different effect from endurance training, “we know from other studies that resistance training is a stronger stimulus for increased muscle mass and increased basal metabolism compared to endurance training and we therefore speculate that participants doing resistance training burn more calories during the day - also in inactive periods-compared to those engaged in endurance training,” Christensen said in an email.

To explore the impact of different types of exercise on heart fat, Christensen and her colleagues recruited 32 adults who were obese and sedentary but did not yet have heart disease, diabetes, or atrial fibrillation.

The participants were randomly assigned to a three-month program of aerobic exercise, weight training or no change in activity (the control group). Each person had an MRI scan of the heart done at the beginning of the study and at the end.

Both types of exercise training reduced epicardial adipose tissue mass compared to no exercise: endurance training, by 32% and weight training, by 24%. However, only weight training had an impact on pericardial adipose tissue, which was reduced by 31% compared to no exercise.

“The resistance exercise training in this study was designed as a 45-minute interval type, medium load, high-repetition, time-based training,” Christensen said. “Participants performed three to five sets of 10 exercises and the sessions were supervised. This specific exercise intervention alone was effective in reducing both fat depots of the heart. We did not combine resistance and endurance training, which would have been interesting to reveal their potential additive effects.”

While there are plenty of studies looking at the impact of reducing abdominal obesity, the new study is interesting because it looks specifically at the relation between exercise and fat (around the heart),” said Dr. Chadi Alraeis, a staff interventional cardiologist and director of Interventional Cardiology at Detroit Medical Center’s Heart Hospital.

Alraeis suspects, based on the new study, that the best way to combat heart fat is to do both endurance and weight training. “Along with the time you spend on the treadmill, you might want to add some work with dumbbells, or some lunges, sit-ups or pushups,” Alraeis said. “It might even be enough to bring some weights to the office so you can use them there. “

While the findings are interesting, “we don’t know what the implication of this is 10 years later,” Alraeis said. “We don’t know if outcomes are really being changed. We need some long-term studies to look at that.”


SOURCE: Effect of Aerobic and Resistance Exercise on Cardiac Adipose Tissues JAMA Cardiology, online July 3, 2019.



https://www.reuters.com/article/us-...e-idUSKCN1U027A
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