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  #16   ^
Old Wed, May-22-19, 14:45
Dodger's Avatar
Dodger Dodger is offline
Posts: 8,381
 
Plan: Paleoish
Stats: 225/170/175 Male 71.5 inches
BF:18%
Progress: 110%
Location: Longmont, Colorado
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I can't remember the last time that a drank anything that was not water, coffee or tea.

I just remembered. It was almost a year ago that I quit drinking alcohol.
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  #17   ^
Old Wed, May-22-19, 16:01
doreen T's Avatar
doreen T doreen T is offline
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Posts: 35,884
 
Plan: DANDR '92
Stats: 241/172/140 Female 165 cm
BF:
Progress: 68%
Location: Eastern ON, Canada
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When I was a kid, a standard juice glass was 4 oz. In a restaurant, an 8 oz glass of juice - if they even offered it - was considered large. Nowadays, 12 oz is considered small (with 8 oz considered extra-small, or a child's portion) ... on up to tall buckets of 24 or 30 oz that almost require two hands to lift it to your mouth . In this age of all things supersized, people look at the cost per oz and see that it's less for the larger size, so they feel cheated by the smaller one!

I recently looked at those sippy juice pouches for babies and toddlers .. they're 6 oz!! 1.5 x what used to be considered an adult serving

Manufacturers and advertisers have the world believing that supersized everything is the way to go .. yet nutrition experts point an accusatory finger at animal protein as the cause of ill health
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  #18   ^
Old Wed, May-22-19, 19:05
Calianna's Avatar
Calianna Calianna is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,212
 
Plan: Atkins-ish (hypoglycemia)
Stats: 000/000/000 Female 63
BF:
Progress: 50%
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doreen T
When I was a kid, a standard juice glass was 4 oz. In a restaurant, an 8 oz glass of juice - if they even offered it - was considered large. Nowadays, 12 oz is considered small (with 8 oz considered extra-small, or a child's portion) ... on up to tall buckets of 24 or 30 oz that almost require two hands to lift it to your mouth . In this age of all things supersized, people look at the cost per oz and see that it's less for the larger size, so they feel cheated by the smaller one!

I recently looked at those sippy juice pouches for babies and toddlers .. they're 6 oz!! 1.5 x what used to be considered an adult serving

Manufacturers and advertisers have the world believing that supersized everything is the way to go .. yet nutrition experts point an accusatory finger at animal protein as the cause of ill health



I remember those tiny juice glasses - I'm sure my mom still has some in her cabinet, but if they've been used at all in the last 20-30 years, it's only been for her grandchildren and great grandchildren.



Yep, just a tiny 4 oz glass of juice was all we drank. We also used to only drink juice once a day (at most), and only at breakfast. Now, people are drinking it all day long.


I remember those little 6 oz cans of frozen orange juice concentrate - you mixed them with 3 cans of water to make 24 oz of juice, which was enough to last almost all week. If you had pancakes, waffles, or french toast with syrup for breakfast one day each week, you probably skipped the juice that day, because the juice would taste unbearably sour in comparison to the syrup. I haven't had juice in well over 15 years, but I'd be almost willing to bet that it doesn't taste nearly so sour these days in comparison to syrup, so that people can still drink it while eating a grain based, sweetened breakfast.
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  #19   ^
Old Thu, May-23-19, 03:25
RonnieScot RonnieScot is offline
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Posts: 300
 
Plan: LCHF, no breakfast.
Stats: 256/144/140 Female 5ft 3"
BF:
Progress: 97%
Location: Scotland, UK
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I would ban fruit juice! Or massively tax so it was a once a year luxury.
So much ground put over to growing fruit for juice. Its not helping people's health.
So much packaging and then transport and storage of something which is mostly water - to me its madness!
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  #20   ^
Old Thu, May-23-19, 07:44
Bob-a-rama's Avatar
Bob-a-rama Bob-a-rama is offline
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Posts: 1,149
 
Plan: Keto (Atkins Induction)
Stats: 230/185/185 Male 5' 11"
BF:
Progress: 100%
Location: Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dodger
I can't remember the last time that a drank anything that was not water, coffee or tea.

I just remembered. It was almost a year ago that I quit drinking alcohol.

Same here.

But I drink perhaps 4 glasses of red wine per year, on special occasions.

Bob
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  #21   ^
Old Fri, May-24-19, 08:45
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 2,911
 
Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
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Just returned from a week in Fort Mill, SC, and the challenge was finding a restaurant that didn't serve sweetened meals and didn't add fruit to everything at every meal. In business meetings during the week, I was a hostage to the food they ordered for lunch every day. Some days we could choose our orders from a menu, but even that was challenging, as with many salads were laden strawberries, orange slices, mangoes, and very sweet dressings with very little protein. Tough to negotiate through this food slalom course, and it's amazing to me how so many have bought into the "healthy fruit" idea. Didn't humanoids during ancient times only eat fruit in season and only the fruit local to their regions and only before a stark winter (in some regions) where they were putting on some fat to prepare for a limited supply of all food during the coming cold period?
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  #22   ^
Old Fri, May-24-19, 12:41
Bob-a-rama's Avatar
Bob-a-rama Bob-a-rama is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,149
 
Plan: Keto (Atkins Induction)
Stats: 230/185/185 Male 5' 11"
BF:
Progress: 100%
Location: Florida
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Fruit ripens right before the starvation season; winter in the temperate zones and the dry season in the tropics.

Loading up on fruit before the starvation season helped early humans survive until food became plentiful again but adding a lot of fat to their bodies.

And those humans with a sweet tooth that loved to eat all that fruit passed on those sweet loving genes to their offspring, while those who didn't eat enough fruit died before the starvation season was over.

And not just humans, bears eat protein when the come out of hibernation and stuff themselves on fruit and berries before going back to sleep for the winter.

In 99% of human existence fruit was only available before the starvation season, but now with canning, refrigeration and rapid transportation it is available all year. I don't consider that a good thing.

But that's just me.

Bob
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  #23   ^
Old Sun, May-26-19, 13:54
Calianna's Avatar
Calianna Calianna is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,212
 
Plan: Atkins-ish (hypoglycemia)
Stats: 000/000/000 Female 63
BF:
Progress: 50%
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If we ate only the fruit that was in season, and only when it's in season, obviously we wouldn't be consuming nearly as much fruit as people tend to eat these days.



We had fruit nearly every day when I was a kid. In season, dad grew watermelons and cantaloupes, but out of season, our fruit consumption was either as that little 4 oz glass of juice with breakfast, or some canned fruit with supper. Even though the fruit was canned in a sugary syrup, the fruit servings were relatively small, for example 1/2 of a canned peach or 1/2 of a canned pear.



These days, people are buying huge trays of cut fruit for parties/office events/soccer practices. Individuals will also buy containers which hold a minimum of 2 cups of cut fruit - sometimes multiple containers daily (and I know they're eating them all that day, because there's a $1 off sticker on it - it's been marked down because it won't be good the next day). Then they'll also buy juice, loads and loads of juice - single serving containers are 12 oz (even though the nutrition info on the bottle says 8 oz is a serving), but most people buy much larger containers of juice - it's not at all unusual to see customers buying several half-gallon or gallon containers of juice for the week.





If they're going to eat that much fruit and drink that much juice, might as well eat candy bars and drink chocolate milk.
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