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  #1   ^
Old Wed, Oct-12-16, 05:08
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
To Good Health!
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Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
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Default Are Calcium Pills Hardening Your Heart Arteries

This alert could be placed in supplements, heart disease or bone general health. This is not new news about Calcium, but this study which used the CAC scan, is the most specific as to the type of damage. Links to previous articles on the same website.

https://www.peoplespharmacy.com/201...heart-arteries/

Quote:
The latest flip-flop in health has to do with calcium. For decades, doctors, nutrition experts and registered dietitians have been urging women to take calcium supplements to strengthen their bones.

A new study shows that advice was likely misguided. In this trial, the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), 5,448 adults who did not have heart disease were followed up for 10 years (Journal of the American Heart Association, October 11, 2016). Researchers had them fill out questionnaires about their diet and supplements. They also underwent scans of their coronary arteries to see how much calcification they had.

This is a measure of heart attack risk. The authors found that “calcium supplement use was associated with a 22% increase in risk in incident CAC” [coronary artery calcification]. When people take calcium pills, their blood levels rise rapidly. This can lead to what doctors call “calcium loading” or excessive calcium throughout the blood stream.

This in turn appears to contribute to atherosclerosis. Plaque in the coronary arteries contains much more calcium than cholesterol. That’s why scans for coronary artery calcification can help predict the risk of heart disease and future heart attacks. The authors speculate that calcium from supplements may also affect insulin metabolism, inflammation, cholesterol and triglycerides. Article continues at link.
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  #2   ^
Old Wed, Oct-12-16, 07:20
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GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
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Not surprising, since the liver makes 80% of the cholesterol found in our blood, which is still a surprise or not known by many medical professionals, it makes sense that the healthiest and safest forms of calcium would come from whole foods. Supplements could likely distort the absorption of the very substance they are contributing, leading to bad things.
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  #3   ^
Old Tue, Oct-25-16, 03:35
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Equinox Equinox is offline
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Plan: BP Diet/Wahls Paleo
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Default

There's another aspect to this: Anyone who takes calcium (like my mother, who has osteoporosis, for instance) should also take vitamin K2, and get some more pre-formed vitamin A (retinol) if possible.

Check out "Vitamin K2 and the Calcium Paradox" by Kate Rhéaume-Bleue. For followers of Weston Price, this makes even more sense, since Chris Masterjohn identified K2 as Price's mysterious "activator X".
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  #4   ^
Old Tue, Oct-25-16, 09:07
MickiSue MickiSue is offline
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Default

That's really interesting, Equinox. I wonder, too, if the form of calcium supplement matters--I suspect, yes.

Most calcium supplements come from seashells. Yeah, that's gotta be good for you! The ones I take come from seaweed, so could arguably be considered "food." That's one reason why I cut back, but not out, my supplements. I come from a long line of women who easily became osteoporotic as they aged.
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  #5   ^
Old Tue, Oct-25-16, 10:15
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
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To me, understanding calcium needs and what happens with calcium supplementation is one of the most important things for people to understand not only for osteoporosis but for atherosclerosis as well. I take vitamin K2 every day, sometimes twice a day in two forms, MK-7 and MK-4. The reason is that after researching the topic of calcium, it turns out that calcium supplementation leads into having calcium where you don't want it, arteries, and not necessarily where you do want it, bones. I've stopped calcium supplements completely, as have all the women in my family, and I supplement with K2, D3, and magnesium. Where do I get my calcium? From food.

Here's a couple video interviews with Kate Rheaume-Bleue explaining the calcium paradox in here words. Thanks for bringing back this topic, Equinox, it's an extremely important issue for better managing health, and it's not being done correctly by the medical establishment (where have we heard that before?).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H2-qqQCD4xM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fYMExQNosTQ
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  #6   ^
Old Wed, Oct-26-16, 10:15
Equinox's Avatar
Equinox Equinox is offline
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Plan: BP Diet/Wahls Paleo
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GBR5111, you're very welcome! Due to my mother's condition and my own age, approaching forty, it's a topic of some concern to me.

I hadn't thought of looking for videos by ms Rheaume-Bleue, will check them out!
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  #7   ^
Old Wed, Oct-26-16, 14:45
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deirdra deirdra is offline
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I wonder why she never mentioned phosphorus. Most calcium supplements are calcium carbonate, but you cannot build bones without enough phosphorus in the correct proportion to make calcium phosphate (another important issue for better managing health that is not being done correctly by the medical establishment). So the excess calcium in supplements will be excreted, or worse - deposited in arteries etc. When you eat meat, poultry, dairy, bones and bone broth, you are getting all the minerals needed to build bone.
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  #8   ^
Old Wed, Oct-26-16, 17:15
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Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
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In 'Wheat Belly' by Dr. William Davis,
He says that taking extra calcium is useless and that we build bone until we are about 18, then we spend the rest of our lives tearing it down, a process regulated by body PH. The chronic mild metabolic acidosis engineered by our diet worsens as we age, starting in our teens and worsening through the eighth decade." and says, "incidentally, taking calcium supplements is no more effective at reversing bone loss than randomly tossing some bags of cement and bricks into your yard is at building a new patio."

"The acidic PH pulls calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate from bone to maintain the body PH of 7.4. The acidic environment also stimulates bone resorbing cells within bone, known as osteoclasts, to work harder and faster to dissolve bone tissue to release the precious calcium."
"The problem comes when you habitually ingest acids in the diet, then draw on calcium stores over and over and over again to neutralize those acids.
An excessively acidified diet will eventually show itself as bone fractures." because the body in an effort to keep "the body slightly alkaline will sacrifice bone health to keep the body pH stable. If not eating Wheat, "Meats such as chicken, pork and beef are a major source of acid in the average American diet.
Acids yielded by meat include uric acid and sulfuric acid (the same as your car battery and acid rain). However protein rich foods may not be as harmful to pH balance as it first appears. Recent research suggests that protein-rich meats have other effects that particularly negate the acid load. Animal protein exerts bone strengthening effect through stimulation of the hormone insulin growth factor (IGF-1) which triggers bone growth and mineralization."

"Vegetables and fruits, on the other hand, are the dominant alkaline foods in the diet. Virtually everything in your produce department will drive pH toward the alkaline direction. From kale to kohlrabi, generous consumption of vegetables and fruits serve to neutralize the acidic burden from animal products."
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