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  #31   ^
Old Wed, Aug-19-20, 06:22
Calianna's Avatar
Calianna Calianna is online now
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Plan: Atkins-ish (hypoglycemia)
Stats: 000/000/000 Female 63
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Progress: 50%
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle
Thanks for the list. Some points I was familiar with and others not so much.

Been mulling it over ......wondering if any can be mitigated by IF. Wondering if cultures that live their ancient ways with less available food also have loss of taste........?
Quote:
Originally Posted by WereBear
It is my opinion that we know most about aging on the SAD diet. So things are open to improvement.



I'm almost 67, switched from high carb to LC around age 50ish.



At that time, my taste buds were rather messed up, especially in regards to sweets. Aside from the constant blood sugar/insulin roller coaster on a high carb diet, I was always craving sweet tastes, but no matter how sweet the food was, it was always disappointing, because it never seemed sweet enough.



I can't remember how long ago the change occurred after switching to LC, but now I can detect even a tiny bit of sweetness in food, so I'm assuming it was a gradual readjustment of my sense of taste. Now, strawberries are plenty sweet, blueberries and cherries are VERY sweet, cantaloupe and watermelon are so excessively sweet that I can't eat more than a bite of them. Forget food that's had sugar added to it - that's sickeningly sweet.


A similar thing has happened with starches, particularly flour. If I eat something that has a little flour or bread crumbs added to it to thicken the sauce or extend the meat - yuck! The taste of flour is overwhelming, despite the fact that I was never able to distinguish the taste of flour on a high carb diet.



Other foods (meats, seasonings, vegetables, fats) also taste more distinct than they did 20 years ago. I have no idea if the ability to distinguish more flavors will continue as I get older, and into the "aged" category (as opposed to just a few years into the senior citizen category), but I hope so.



How about those of you who are in your 70's and 80's - how's your sense of taste doing on LC, as compared to your high carb days?
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  #32   ^
Old Wed, Aug-19-20, 07:44
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/230/200 Female 5'8"
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Yes!!!! I noticed a complete switch reguarding sugar/sweet, too. When eating SAD, never sugary enough, and sweets not satisfying. Theses days I can taste sweet in anything with added sugar. (AND my teens can , too.)

Oddly, just last week I cooked up a steak and it tasted sweet. Sweet for a peice of beef. Surprized me. Never had experienced sweet meat without adding sugar before. A new experience.How can beef taste sweet?!?!?

Given our conversation, I was thinking of cellular repair due to not just change in foods we are eating, but also a repair or rejuvenation of the tissues due to IF /fasting.

Last edited by Ms Arielle : Wed, Aug-19-20 at 07:52.
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  #33   ^
Old Wed, Aug-19-20, 13:32
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Bob-a-rama Bob-a-rama is offline
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Plan: Keto (Atkins Induction)
Stats: 235/171/185 Male 5' 11"
BF:
Progress: 128%
Location: Florida
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I noticed no change in taste when going LC. I did notice a change in my weight though.
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  #34   ^
Old Wed, Aug-19-20, 15:03
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/230/200 Female 5'8"
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Nothing , Bob? No change at all? Perhaps sweets were not your carb of choice...?

My teens find foods " too sweet" now. Not that that stops the consumption of a cupcake. Its just sweeter to them both. And they are not as LC as I try to be.

Last edited by Ms Arielle : Wed, Aug-19-20 at 15:36.
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  #35   ^
Old Thu, Aug-20-20, 08:44
Bob-a-rama's Avatar
Bob-a-rama Bob-a-rama is offline
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Posts: 1,675
 
Plan: Keto (Atkins Induction)
Stats: 235/171/185 Male 5' 11"
BF:
Progress: 128%
Location: Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle
Nothing , Bob? No change at all? Perhaps sweets were not your carb of choice...?

My teens find foods " too sweet" now. Not that that stops the consumption of a cupcake. Its just sweeter to them both. And they are not as LC as I try to be.

Donuts, cakes, brownies, cookies, grape juice, etc. used to be my downfall.

Being Italian I love macaroni, but don't eat it anymore, and potatoes fried in bacon grease used to be sublime. But of course, those aren't sweets.

I went on vacation to Austria last year, and when I travel overseas, I break my WOE but in moderation. I wan't to taste what they are famous for, and Austria has some very famous desserts. They were absolutely yummy.

The only downside was I caught the first cold I've had in 15 years. When I got home I had one day of runny nose, one day of cough and that was it.

Being in Keto is good for the immune system (so I've read in multiple trusted sources).

I gained a couple of pounds in that two week vacation, but it didn't last long after I got home.

I did better the year before in Australia for 5 weeks. Most of the foods they called home weren't desserts. I don't think we ate any sweets there.

My DW has had taste changes after keto, but I guess I'm not like most folks. (That's OK with me.)

Bob
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  #36   ^
Old Thu, Aug-20-20, 08:55
Bonnie OFS Bonnie OFS is offline
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Plan: Dr. Bernstein
Stats: 188/150/135 Female 5 ft 4 inches
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Carb combinations & cravings can be weird. I no longer care for chocolate because - except for the Russell Stover SF mints (which have only the chocolate coating) - most SF versions just don't taste right to me.

But bread - oh yeah! - almost anything made of wheat flour (including macaroni) - corn or rice - I loved & craved. (Reading a book the other night, the description of corn pone topped with thick bacon almost had me drooling!)

Also sweet creamy desserts, like crème brûlée, would send me to that private, wonderful taste heaven.
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  #37   ^
Old Thu, Aug-20-20, 10:16
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/123/150 Female 67
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I can now taste the sweet in the bit of heavy cream I put in coffee.
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  #38   ^
Old Thu, Aug-20-20, 10:40
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Plan: atkins
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~Bob, well, clearly like most areas we discuss, individual response is individual.
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  #39   ^
Old Thu, Aug-27-20, 16:41
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Charran Charran is offline
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Plan: my own
Stats: 253/187.6/153 Female 5 feet 7 inches
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Quote:
Plus I follow the arthritis/bursitis diet and both my former arthritis and bursitis are gone - without any meds.


Bob-a-rama- Can you direct me to this diet or tell me what it entails?
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  #40   ^
Old Fri, Aug-28-20, 08:37
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Bob-a-rama Bob-a-rama is offline
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Posts: 1,675
 
Plan: Keto (Atkins Induction)
Stats: 235/171/185 Male 5' 11"
BF:
Progress: 128%
Location: Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle
~Bob, well, clearly like most areas we discuss, individual response is individual.

Sometimes it amazes me as to how different we are at the basic level. At the nature level as well as the nurture level.
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  #41   ^
Old Sat, Aug-29-20, 04:06
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Benay Benay is offline
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Plan: Protein Power/Atkins
Stats: 250/181/165 Female 5 feet 6 inches
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Location: Prescott, Arizona, USA
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I have become so sensitive to carbs that I get hand cramps for eating one throat lozenge - cough drops
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  #42   ^
Old Sat, Aug-29-20, 09:02
Bob-a-rama's Avatar
Bob-a-rama Bob-a-rama is offline
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Posts: 1,675
 
Plan: Keto (Atkins Induction)
Stats: 235/171/185 Male 5' 11"
BF:
Progress: 128%
Location: Florida
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charran
Bob-a-rama- Can you direct me to this diet or tell me what it entails?

Here it is. Before the diet I couldn't walk two blocks without sitting. Now I walk 4 miles briskly for exercise with zero pain. Before the diet the little finger on my left hand was so bad I skipped G# notes on my saxophone. Now I can play all the G#s I want.

It was given to me by a doctor, who doesn't believe in meds as a first response. Unfortunately he retired years ago.

For both arthritis and bursitis, treatment is similar:

Try the dietary approach first, and if that doesn't work, take stronger action.

Foods that may contribute to chronic inflammation are foods with a high glycemic index (foods that convert to sugar quickly), such as fruit juices, sugars, simple starches, or rice cakes, foods heavy in polyunsaturated or saturated fats, and foods high in arachidonic acid. Some specific foods to avoid are:

* Fatty cuts of red meat (high in saturated fats) lean is good
* Organ meats: liver, kidney, and so forth (very high in arachidonic acid)
* Egg yolks (very high in arachidonic acid)
* Poultry - chicken, duck, turkey (very high in arachidonic acid)
* Pasta (high glycemic index)
* Juices (high glycemic index)
* Rice, especially rice cakes (high glycemic index)
* White bread (substitute whole grain breads such as rye)
* Nightshade Plants bother many people (tomatoes, potatoes, eggplants, peppers, paprika)

Glycemic index charts can be found on the Internet.

Better choices are foods with a low glycemic index and foods that are heavy in monounsaturated fats. Some specific good foods are:

* Salmon and other fish
* Oatmeal
* Low glycemic fresh fruits and vegetables
* Olives and olive oil
* Peanuts and other nuts
* Whey proteins
* Lean beef is good, 100% grass fed is better


I've shared this with others, and it always gives great improvement to complete.

Try it strictly for a month and see what it does for you. The doc said, "no cheating for the first month, if you fall off the wagon once, start over".

Giving up chicken was the hardest for me, but walking 4 miles with no pain is even better.
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  #43   ^
Old Sat, Aug-29-20, 09:51
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Charran Charran is offline
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Posts: 9,208
 
Plan: my own
Stats: 253/187.6/153 Female 5 feet 7 inches
BF:
Progress: 65%
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Bob-a-rama- Thanks so much for the response. I've been doing some research in this area. I was surprised by some of the things on this list, but it's definitely worth a try to stop the pain.
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  #44   ^
Old Sun, Aug-30-20, 08:55
Bob-a-rama's Avatar
Bob-a-rama Bob-a-rama is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,675
 
Plan: Keto (Atkins Induction)
Stats: 235/171/185 Male 5' 11"
BF:
Progress: 128%
Location: Florida
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charran
Bob-a-rama- Thanks so much for the response. I've been doing some research in this area. I was surprised by some of the things on this list, but it's definitely worth a try to stop the pain.

Good luck!

Let me know if it works for you, and feel free to share it with others.

If it doesn't work, you'd be the first that I know of that has tried it.

Bob
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  #45   ^
Old Sun, Aug-30-20, 12:18
Calianna's Avatar
Calianna Calianna is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 1,499
 
Plan: Atkins-ish (hypoglycemia)
Stats: 000/000/000 Female 63
BF:
Progress: 50%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob-a-rama
Here it is. Before the diet I couldn't walk two blocks without sitting. Now I walk 4 miles briskly for exercise with zero pain. Before the diet the little finger on my left hand was so bad I skipped G# notes on my saxophone. Now I can play all the G#s I want.

It was given to me by a doctor, who doesn't believe in meds as a first response. Unfortunately he retired years ago.

For both arthritis and bursitis, treatment is similar:

Try the dietary approach first, and if that doesn't work, take stronger action.

Foods that may contribute to chronic inflammation are foods with a high glycemic index (foods that convert to sugar quickly), such as fruit juices, sugars, simple starches, or rice cakes, foods heavy in polyunsaturated or saturated fats, and foods high in arachidonic acid. Some specific foods to avoid are:

* Fatty cuts of red meat (high in saturated fats) lean is good
* Organ meats: liver, kidney, and so forth (very high in arachidonic acid)
* Egg yolks (very high in arachidonic acid)
* Poultry - chicken, duck, turkey (very high in arachidonic acid)
* Pasta (high glycemic index)
* Juices (high glycemic index)
* Rice, especially rice cakes (high glycemic index)
* White bread (substitute whole grain breads such as rye)
* Nightshade Plants bother many people (tomatoes, potatoes, eggplants, peppers, paprika)

Glycemic index charts can be found on the Internet.

Better choices are foods with a low glycemic index and foods that are heavy in monounsaturated fats. Some specific good foods are:

* Salmon and other fish
* Oatmeal
* Low glycemic fresh fruits and vegetables
* Olives and olive oil
* Peanuts and other nuts
* Whey proteins
* Lean beef is good, 100% grass fed is better


I've shared this with others, and it always gives great improvement to complete.

Try it strictly for a month and see what it does for you. The doc said, "no cheating for the first month, if you fall off the wagon once, start over".

Giving up chicken was the hardest for me, but walking 4 miles with no pain is even better.



I know you've shared this list before on here, and I'm curious about a few things on the list.

Does the diet mention any reason for avoiding saturated fats, such as fatty cuts of beef? The polyunsaturated I can understand - damaged oils, and not a good ratio of omega 3 to omega 6. But the beef I don't get - I would have thought that the vast majority of the problem came from polyunsaturates, instead of natural saturated fats. When it comes to beef, what's considered to be a lean enough cut?


I think you've mentioned that you use the grass fed ground beef from Aldi, and if I recall correctly (from the last time I happened to see grass fed ground beef at aldi), their grass fed is 85%/15%. Is that considered lean enough? I ask because a lot of people wouldn't consider ground beef to be lean unless it's at least 90%/10%, and would prefer 93%/7% or even 97%/3%, or they'd consider it to be fatty, instead of lean.



I don't see pork mentioned - is that allowed? As I understand it, pork has a nearly perfect balance of fats: Saturated and monounsaturated are nearly equal, while polyunsaturated is less than 1/3 of each of the other two. Or are you truly limited to beef and fish?

As as LCer, I doubt you're using oatmeal (unless it's in minuscule amounts), due to the carb content, so there's one thing that's allowed that's automatically off the approved list fot a LCer.

I see a trend on that list towards mostly lower carb foods, so have to wonder what makes whole grain breads any better than white bread (aside from the supposedly glowing aura of fiber in the whole grains), because even whole wheat bread is going to be mostly carbs. Years ago, I used to make 100% whole grain rye. There's almost no gluten at all in rye, so it rises very, very little, and the loaf comes out extremely dense... about like a brick. (even thought it was still delicious - just had to slice it extremely thin, so I could chew it) If you want it like bakery rye, it will need approximately half wheat (white) flour, and preferably some high gluten (white) flour, so it can rise better, and give it a more edible, less brick-like texture.

I have to wonder why peanuts are on the approved list with nuts, since they're actually a legume, rather than a nut. Not that I do well with either peanuts or tree nuts - Peanuts don't seem to like me , and tree nuts are too addictive for me. So another whole section that would be off that short little approved list for me.

Low Glycemic veggies and fruit (aka, pretty much the only ones we eat on LC anyway) - no problem with that.

Not being able to eat any chicken or eggs at all though... that would really, seriously limit my food choices.

Whey proteins are allowed, I'm assuming in the form of whey protein powders. How about dairy in general? Milk is high in carbs to try to fit into a LC plan, but plain greek yogurt cuts the carb count in half, making it doable. Cheese - very low in carbs, but high in saturated fats.

I don't mean to make this sound like the Spanish Inquisition - just trying to figure out the logic behind why some items are on the yes list, and others on the no list, and why other types of food aren't even mentioned.
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