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  #16   ^
Old Sun, Apr-18-21, 04:21
Benay's Avatar
Benay Benay is offline
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Posts: 761
 
Plan: Protein Power/Atkins
Stats: 250/181/165 Female 5 feet 6 inches
BF:
Progress: 81%
Location: Prescott, Arizona, USA
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Thanks Janet. Good information.

If keeping insulin low is the main issue, I will have to see what foods I have eaten that could have triggered these attacks.

I wonder about timing.
How long does it take for an upswing in insulin (to control carbs) impact uric acid levels?

24 hours? A week? It would be helpful to know, then it wouldn't be so hard to track diet as the cause.
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  #17   ^
Old Sun, Apr-18-21, 07:04
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 3,655
 
Plan: Very LC, Higher Protein
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JEY100
Insulin and Gout

The story is similar for gout. Gout flares happen when a compound called uric acid builds up in the joints and forms solid crystals. If you or someone you know suffers from gout, then you know it’s very painful.

Typically, healthy kidneys hold on to the right amount of uric acid and filter out the rest—much like they hang on to the right amount of sodium—but high insulin levels cause your kidneys to hold on to more uric acid than normal.

The parallels between sodium, uric acid, kidney function, and your overall health don’t end there. Uric acid comes from the breakdown of something called purines. Purines are nitrogen-containing compounds that your body produces, and they are also found in foods—protein-rich foods, in particular. Certain proteins—such as shellfish, red meat, and organ meats (liver, kidney)—are higher in purines than than others, which is why people who suffer from gout are advised to avoid these foods.

However, red meat and shellfish are among the most nutrient-dense foods in the modern diet. Aside from being great sources of complete protein, they’re loaded with B vitamins, iron, zinc, selenium, and other critical vitamins and minerals. You can get these nutrients from other foods, but red meat and seafood provide them in exceptionally high amounts and in forms your body can absorb more easily than others, and you don’t need to avoid them if you have gout.

If gout flares come from an accumulation of uric acid crystals in your joints, and elevated insulin causes your kidneys to hang on to too much uric acid, then rather than avoiding foods whose breakdown creates uric acid, you might be better served by keeping your insulin level lower. Plus, uric acid doesn’t exist to trigger gout attacks and cause you pain. It’s an antioxidant, so you wouldn’t want to be entirely without uric acid in your body.

Too much is a problem, but you do need some. And “too much” uric acid comes from too much insulin. The truth is, if you have gout, you can enjoy more red meat and seafood—as long as you keep your carbohydrate intake low.

From the Insulin chapter in Dr Eric Westman's new book,
End Your Carb Confusion

One of the best explanations of gout and its causes that I've read.
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  #18   ^
Old Yesterday, 03:50
Benay's Avatar
Benay Benay is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 761
 
Plan: Protein Power/Atkins
Stats: 250/181/165 Female 5 feet 6 inches
BF:
Progress: 81%
Location: Prescott, Arizona, USA
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Jey, thanks for this explanation. Great info. That is the assumption we were working on one month ago but the technician who was to draw blood to verify the diagnosis never came. So I continued with intermittent pain in both feet plus swelling.

Yesterday the NP came again. When I told her the pain shifted feet and never seems to affect the same part of the foot - sometimes the instep, sometimes the big toe, sometimes the side, she said it was definitely NOT gout.

She said it sounded more like an autoimmune disease and ordered blood work again.

I told her that when I saw her a month ago I had fallen off the low carb wagon and had been indulging in a morning croissant. Boom! Wheat!!! Boom boom!

However, I had finished the croissants by the next day and was looking for carbs in everything I ate since. But the pain and swelling persisted.

I had no idea that I could get such a painful autoimmune reaction to wheat that has lasted one month! Still painful. I am going to have to re-read Wheat Belly to see what he has to say about autoimmune responses to wheat. I obviously missed that.
Does anyone remember?
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  #19   ^
Old Yesterday, 08:50
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 3,655
 
Plan: Very LC, Higher Protein
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
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Quote:
"If gout flares come from an accumulation of uric acid crystals in your joints, and elevated insulin causes your kidneys to hang on to too much uric acid, then rather than avoiding foods whose breakdown creates uric acid, you might be better served by keeping your insulin level lower. Plus, uric acid doesn’t exist to trigger gout attacks and cause you pain. It’s an antioxidant, so you wouldn’t want to be entirely without uric acid in your body."


This is key. Looking for nutrient density includes adding organ meat, red meat, and shellfish when it's fresh and available, to my diet. Although organ meats tend to be slightly higher in carbs, none of these spikes insulin to the degree where I'd have to eliminate them. Maintaining a lower BG level enabled me to eliminate gout symptoms completely many years ago. Some may have triggers with certain foods, and what those triggers are likely vary in an individual. Most of the conventional medical advice on managing gout never worked for me.
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  #20   ^
Old Today, 05:10
Benay's Avatar
Benay Benay is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 761
 
Plan: Protein Power/Atkins
Stats: 250/181/165 Female 5 feet 6 inches
BF:
Progress: 81%
Location: Prescott, Arizona, USA
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Rob, I don't have gout
Apparently, I have an autoimmune response to gluten
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  #21   ^
Old Today, 08:23
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 3,655
 
Plan: Very LC, Higher Protein
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
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Benay, read your post with the diagnosis. Good that you don't have gout. Knowing this will help you avoid gluten. Giving up wheat and all other grains years ago has made a major difference for me. I didn't really focus on gluten alone, as there are other bad actors in that group. Hopefully, this diagnosis provides you the information to reverse your autoimmune response.
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