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  #1   ^
Old Sat, May-18-19, 00:19
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Default Large glass of fruit juice a day increases risk of premature death, research suggests

Quote:
From The Telegraph
London, UK
17 May, 2019

Large glass of fruit juice a day increases risk of premature death, research suggests

Fruit juice could be even worse for the health than drinking cola and lemonade, US research suggests. The study of 13,000 adults found that a 12 oz glass of juice a day could increase the risk of early death by almost a quarter.

Experts said the fructose content of such drinks could be driving up insulin resistance and stimulating hormones that promotes fat deposition around the waist. Both can lead to a greater chance of heart disease and diabetes.

The new research, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), compared, for the first time, 100 per cent fruit juices with sugar-sweetened beverages such as cola and lemonade.

It found that higher death rates were associated with consumption of all sugary drinks.

A daily 12 oz (340ml) glass of a sugar-sweetened drink such as cola was linked to a 6 per cent increased risk of early death over the six year study.

And drinking an extra fruit juice of the same volume was linked to a 24 per cent rise in premature mortality.

Researchers from Emory University in Atlanta and Cornell University in New York, said the impact did not seem to stem just from the impact of the drinks on obesity, as the findings were adjusted to take account of this.

However, the study was observational, so it could not demonstrate that the drinks caused the increased health risks.

During an average follow-up of six years, there were 1,000 deaths from any cause. Participants had an average age of 64 at the start of the study.
British scientists said the findings were important.

They said many people drank too many juices and smoothies, disregarding their high sugar content, when they would be better eating pieces of fruit, which are more filling.

The NHS recommends a maximum of one portion of 150 ml of fruit juice daily, as part of “5 a day”.

Typically, people in the study got 8.4 per cent of their calorie intake each day from sugar-sweetened drinks and 4 per cent from 100 per cent fruit juice.

Dr Gunter Kuhnle, associate professor in nutrition and health at the University of Reading, said: "This is a very important study, especially as fruit juices are often seen as a 'healthy' alternative to sugar-sweetened beverages, even though they often contain much more sugar (especially smoothies).

"Fruit juices are a poor replacement for actual fruit consumption, in particular as they can be much more easily over-consumed,” he said.
"In the UK, the general recommendation is that a 150ml glass of fruit juice can provide one of the five-a-day, but not more.

"This is less than half of the amount found in this study to result in a modest increase in mortality, so there is no suggestion from this study that one glass a day is problematic,” he said.

Dr Alison Tedstone, chief nutritionist at Public Health England, said: “This study is a reminder that consuming sugary drinks can contribute to dental caries, increased calories, weight gain, and associated ill health.

“Current advice is to swap sugary drinks for water, lower fat milks and lower sugar or diet drinks. While fruit and vegetable juices can contribute to one of your 5 A Day, it’s important to limit juice and smoothies to a total of 150 mls each day as they can still contain high amounts of sugar.”



https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/20...-drinking-cola/
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  #2   ^
Old Sat, May-18-19, 08:20
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GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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Default

This is something many are aware of, but it's not communicated properly. The mantra to eat healthy fruits and vegetables has been distorted by juice manufacturers in their efforts to sell juice that comes with all the health issues of sweetened soda.

It's an easy sell when one believes in the healthy properties of fruit, that the juice of those fruits would boost the healthy properties even more. Common sense, right?
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  #3   ^
Old Sat, May-18-19, 11:39
CityGirl8 CityGirl8 is offline
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Plan: Protein Power, IF
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I haven't drunk juice regularly in years. I love lemonade, but mainly I try to make it at home with non-sugar sweeteners. It's good to see the article focusing on the problems of high sugar consumption. Hopefully, it's a sign that people are gradually coming to realize that sweetened foods and beverages might be okay as treats, but not daily or weekly and we don't need added sugar in every single thing.
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  #4   ^
Old Sat, May-18-19, 12:15
Verbena Verbena is offline
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When I have extra lemons I like to juice them & and freeze the juice in ice cube trays. On a hot summer's day a glass of soda water with a couple of lemon ice cubes makes a refreshing drink. I like it as is, others might prefer some sweetener added. (I also zest the lemons, if they are organic/unsprayed, and either dry the zest, or put a half teaspoon or so in the ice cube tray & top off with lemon juice. Melt a cube before cooking & have both zest & juice ready for my recipe)
Regular lemonade is way way too sweet for me
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  #5   ^
Old Sat, May-18-19, 13:19
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deirdra deirdra is offline
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I have a SodaStream and like ~1 tsp lemon juice in a glass of carbonated water. I used to put a couple of drops of stevia in with 1 tblsp of lemon juice, but find that less lemon and no sweetener along with the bubbles makes a tangy and more refreshing drink.

Once people learn that 12 oz of juice has as much sugar as sodas, we can start teaching them how starch starts being broken down into sugar in their mouths.
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  #6   ^
Old Sun, May-19-19, 09:27
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Merpig Merpig is offline
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I live in Florida where it seems almost everyone believes a big tall glass of Florida OJ is a super healthy drink. At my Audubon breakfast yesterday a big half gallon of OJ was provided. No thanks! I don’t even eat oranges except for, very occasionally, a tiny Cutie. And even then rarely as supermarkets only sell them in 3 or 5 pound bags which of course I could never eat before 80% of them got rotten.
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  #7   ^
Old Mon, May-20-19, 08:14
Bonnie OFS Bonnie OFS is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GRB5111
It's an easy sell when one believes in the healthy properties of fruit, that the juice of those fruits would boost the healthy properties even more. Common sense, right?


And sadly, I was one who believed that. I've apologized to the kids for giving them so much fruit juice.

When they were teens I got a juicer & make vegetable juices - I thought they were more healthful. Jack LaLanne was really big on juices. It worked for him, but not for me.
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  #8   ^
Old Mon, May-20-19, 09:19
Zei Zei is offline
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Jack LaLanne didn't get into juicing until he was older. That plus maybe he was gifted with a great metabolism. He used to be one of the early proponents of reducing carbs, giving diet tips on his TV show to all those ladies exercising along with it to cut out the sugary desserts and stuff, even telling how his family dog was so healthy because he fed it meat, not kibble.
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  #9   ^
Old Mon, May-20-19, 09:58
Bonnie OFS Bonnie OFS is offline
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Mom followed Jack LaLanne off & on for years. I don't remember much about the early years, except for the dogs, but it was his influence that convinced my parents to buy his juicer somewhere around the turn of the century. That was before any of us connected the increased sugars in fruit & vegetable juices with poor health outcomes for t2 diabetics - which my dad had been diagnosed with at that time.

But I have wonderful taste bud memories of the food bar in the the back of the health food store in the mid-70s. That got me converted to alfalfa sprouts, whole-grain breads, & pea & bean based sandwich spreads. They also made a fantastic juice mix of spinach, carrot, celery & something else I don't remember. How did I get so unhealthy when I loved that hearthealthywholegrain goodness so much!
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  #10   ^
Old Mon, May-20-19, 11:57
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Calianna Calianna is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deirdra
I have a SodaStream and like ~1 tsp lemon juice in a glass of carbonated water. I used to put a couple of drops of stevia in with 1 tblsp of lemon juice, but find that less lemon and no sweetener along with the bubbles makes a tangy and more refreshing drink.

Once people learn that 12 oz of juice has as much sugar as sodas, we can start teaching them how starch starts being broken down into sugar in their mouths.





This used to be a standard middle school (or even elementary school) science demonstration. Each student in the class would be given a saltine cracker, and told to chew it - we were not to swallow it, just keep chewing it. Didn't take very long before that salty cracker started to taste sweet, as our saliva started to convert the starch into sugar. (30 seconds? maybe a minute, at most?)



Somewhere along about the late 70's or early 80's we completely forgot that very important bit of knowledge about the properties of starches, as whole grains with their inherent starches were being routinely elevated to their status as the holy grail of health.



Unfortunately they wouldn't give kids saltines today to demonstrate how quickly starch turns to sugar - saltines are not whole grain. And some kids in the class might have a gluten intolerance, or at least be on a gluten free diet.
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  #11   ^
Old Wed, May-22-19, 06:02
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JEY100 JEY100 is online now
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Plan: LC//DrWestman/P:E/DDF
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Default

And news from the US:

Keto diet credited for a decline in fruit sales

Quote:
Blue Book Services, a website that provides marketing information for the produce industry, says overall fruit sales are declining in the US. Why the recent downturn? The rising popularity of the keto diet!

Blue Book Services: Fruit sales shifts reflect a fad diet’s power over consumers

Matt Lally, associate director for Nielson, a market research company that tracks what people buy, notes that in 2018, 37 % of households were following some form of diet, but keto eating was taking a sizeable portion of that.

Six percent of households in the US say they’re following the keto diet. One of the core philosophies of keto is avoiding high sugar fruits, which Lally said correlates with lower fruit sales.

Berries, however, are seeing a rise in sales of both fresh and frozen, and seem to be the only exception because they are allowed on the keto diet, Lally says. The new statistics were detailed in the United Fresh Produce Association’s May retail report.

Overall there seems to be a connection between diet trends and consumer behaviour, particularly with the keto diet and fruit.

Although we cannot confirm the accuracy of the estimate that 6% of US households are doing the keto diet, a Google trends analysis shows that the search term “keto diet” increased 400% between 2016 and 2017.

Diet Doctor even gets a shout-out in the article. Pamela Riemenschneider, author and retail editor for Blue Book Services, highlights a list of keto-friendly fruits that produce suppliers could focus on to increase profits. She recommends referring to Diet Doctor for our guide to keto-friendly produce.

This sales trend is great news, because it’s proof that by voting with our dollar we are showing food producers what we want — and more of us are wanting to eat low-carb!


https://www.dietdoctor.com/keto-die...-in-fruit-sales
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  #12   ^
Old Wed, May-22-19, 06:22
tess9132 tess9132 is offline
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Quote:
Six percent of households in the US say they’re following the keto diet. One of the core philosophies of keto is avoiding high sugar fruits, which Lally said correlates with lower fruit sales.
I wouldn't be surprised if, in some areas, that number is closer to 20 percent. Seriously, everybody I know is cutting carbs - From my neighbors to my dermatologist to the lady who checks my receipt when I'm leaving Costco. And not just for weight loss and blood sugar issues, either. Arthritis, blood pressure, mood issues, you name it, people are finding relief eating low carb and they're talking about it.

I recently went on a parent/child school trip into NYC with my son's class. There was school provided food for the bus ride. I was our bus captain and so was responsible for distribution of the food. The protein bars and cashews were almost all gone. The bananas and mini muffins were hardly touched. "Too much sugar" "not worth the carbs." On the other hand, the soft pretzels with mustard did go pretty well. I guess some things die harder - we are from Philadelphia after all.

Last edited by tess9132 : Wed, May-22-19 at 06:44.
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  #13   ^
Old Wed, May-22-19, 08:22
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Bob-a-rama Bob-a-rama is offline
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Plan: Keto (Atkins Induction)
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Fruit juice today, is basically sugar water with some fruit flavor. Even if there is no added sugar.

Fruit itself has much, much, much more sugar than it did in pre-agricultural times. Humankind had taken the sweetest fruit, planted seeds from it, chose the sweetest of those to replant, and over the period of time have developed fruit that has many times the sugar content of the historic wild variety.

In a way, fruit today is genetically modified. Most of it has way too many carbs for me to eat without getting out of ketosis.

Bob
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  #14   ^
Old Wed, May-22-19, 11:00
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Lbangle Lbangle is offline
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I must say that fruit and fruit juice are things I really, really miss on this diet. I do eat blueberries and strawberries in moderation. I grew up drinking orange juice everyday. I remember cans of frozen juice in the freezer all the time.

I admit that I have had diet cranberry juice when the juice urge hits. It has 5 calories, 2 carbs.
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  #15   ^
Old Wed, May-22-19, 11:06
Bonnie OFS Bonnie OFS is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lbangle
I must say that fruit and fruit juice are things I really, really miss on this diet.


I hadn't realized how much I missed it until the other day when I was introduced to Crystal Light packets that you add to a bottle of water. It usually takes me a while to down a bottle of water, but with the raspberry/lemonade flavor I guzzled it right down. I suspect that it's not a very good thing for me.
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