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  #1   ^
Old Sun, Nov-18-18, 10:27
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is offline
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Default Study of two tribes sheds light on role of Western-influenced diet in blood pressure

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releas...81114160024.htm

Quote:
A South American tribe living in near-total isolation with no Western dietary influences showed no increase in average blood pressure from age one to age 60, according to a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. In comparison, a nearby tribe whose diet includes some processed foods and salt did show higher blood pressure into late middle age.

In the U.S. and most other countries, blood pressure rises with age, beginning early in life. Results of this study support the idea that the tendency in Westernized societies for blood pressure to rise with age is not a natural part of aging but could result from a cumulative effect of exposure to Western diet and lifestyle.

The findings appear November 14 in the journal JAMA Cardiology.

"The idea that rising blood pressure is a result of aging is a widely held belief in cardiology, but our findings add to evidence that rising blood pressure may be an avoidable consequence of Western diet and lifestyle rather than aging itself," says Noel Mueller, PhD, MPH, assistant professor of epidemiology at the Bloomberg School and member of the Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research.

For their study, the researchers took blood pressure measurements from 72 Yanomami aged one to 60, and found no trend towards higher or lower readings as the participants aged. The researchers also measured blood pressure in 83 members of the nearby Yekwana tribe, which is more exposed to Western influences including dietary -- and here they found a clear trend towards higher pressure with advancing age.

The Yanomami live as hunter-gatherers and gardeners in a remote rainforest region of northern Brazil and southern Venezuela. Their diet is low in fat and salt and high in fruits and fiber. Studies of adult Yanomami since the 1980s have shown that atherosclerosis and obesity are virtually unknown among them, and that they have extraordinarily low blood pressure on average, with no apparent increase as they age.

The new study reveals that this age-stability of blood pressure among the Yanomami starts in early childhood. It is the first to compare the Yanomami to a geographically co-located population -- the Yekwana -- that has had a different exposure to Western diet and other Western lifestyle influences.

The researchers, examining members of Yanomami villages in southern Venezuela, found that their blood pressure measurements averaged 95 (mm Hg) systolic over 63 diastolic. (In U.S. adults, the average systolic is 122 and diastolic 71.) This low figure among the Yanomami is consistent with prior studies in Yanomami adults, but the researchers measured roughly the same blood pressure among Yanomami children as well. In fact, the data suggest that blood pressure in this population remains close to the same low level from age one at least through age 60, with no trend towards an increase or decrease.

In contrast to the Yanomami, the Yekwana have been exposed to some aspects of Western lifestyle and diet, including processed foods, through interaction and trade with the industrialized world. While blood pressure readings at the youngest ages were virtually the same as those for their Yanomami peers, there was a statistically clear trend towards rising levels with advancing age -- roughly 0.25 mm Hg per year -- such that the Yekwana had levels averaging 5.8 mm Hg higher by age 10, and 15.9 mm Hg higher by age 50.

"This age-related rise in blood pressure begins in early childhood -- which suggests that early childhood may be a 'window of opportunity' for lifestyle interventions to prevent later rises in blood pressure," Mueller says.

To put these findings in context, in the U.S. systolic blood pressure rises by about 1.5 mm Hg and 1.9 mm Hg per year among boys and girls, respectively, and 0.6 mm Hg per year among adults.

Mueller and his colleagues plan to follow up with a study of the gut bacteria of the Yanomami and Yekwana to determine if the gut microbiome account for the two tribes' differences in blood pressure with advancing age.



The purpose of studies like this one, at least as their written up for public consumption, seems to be to support what the government nutritional "authorities" already claim.

Quote:
Their diet is low in fat and salt and high in fruits and fiber.


I don't know if this would do the trick. Assuming we know what's exactly at work in a paleo type diet is dangerous--I never believed in Paleo 2.0, and the criticism of paleo "re-enactment." Paleo is basically epidemiology, a bit better because the difference in diets between a paleo people and the SAD diet in general is much clearer than that found within our culture through brief after the fact food diaries. Anyways, we know they're doing something different that's helping, we just don't know what. I think, do as much of what they're doing as possible, avoid as many foods they don't have as possible, we're more likely to get their results--without knowing exactly what's at work. They very different sorts of social pressure between hunter gatherer and industrial societies is probably a factor. I've noticed that nervous energy from being around people (social anxiety) can sometimes bump my blood pressure up into the very low normal range, when I'm calmer it's usually optimal. I eat no fiber, worry more about getting enough salt rather than hoping to get too little, and eat an 80 percent plus fat diet.

This won't be me, because low fat's a no-starter for me. I don't doubt that there are people who would do better on a Yanomami diet, though.

Having epidemiology that shows high salt bad, and then finding more epidemiology, or that a paleo group has low blood pressure on a low sodium diet--I don't really think that adds much to our knowledge. Refined salt, refined sugar, refined wheat, refined meat, these all travel together.
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  #2   ^
Old Sun, Nov-18-18, 12:23
dan_rose dan_rose is offline
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Gary Taubes recently wrote the following articles that are somewhat related - Part1 and Part2
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  #3   ^
Old Sun, Nov-18-18, 12:48
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GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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Very interesting, and I agree with your observations, teaser. Haven't jumped into the Taubes articles, but I would add to these thoughts the influence of genetics as well. There are many eating a SAD or western diet that have normal blood pressure. So, who are those that develop high blood pressure over time? And did they have a genetic predisposition that when coupled with diet, caused a rise in BP possibly from an epigenetic influence of triggering that predisposition? Low carb normalized my BP, but hardly to the degree that was measured in the Yanomami.
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  #4   ^
Old Sun, Nov-18-18, 15:03
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Dont see any grains in that there diet!!!!
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  #5   ^
Old Mon, Nov-19-18, 11:34
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Nancy LC Nancy LC is offline
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Everyone, and I mean everyone, in my family gets high blood pressure. Except me when I'm low carbing.
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  #6   ^
Old Mon, Nov-19-18, 15:31
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Yup!!!!!!!!!!!
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  #7   ^
Old Fri, Jul-12-19, 17:01
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Dodger Dodger is offline
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I searched and found this info on the Yamomani diet.

Quote:
For food, the Yanomami eat most of what the jungle can offer, which is quite a wide variety of foods. They feast on all kinds of edible fare ranging from snakes, wild pigs, monkeys, deer, and jaguars to varieties of insects, larvae, fish, crabs, wild honey, plantain, sweet potato, and palm fruits. By world health standards, the Yanomami enjoy a high standard of living.
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  #8   ^
Old Fri, Jul-12-19, 17:17
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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I sure hope these people do not get "Westernized" . IMHO the tribes that still live close to the land will outlive the rest of us.

Last edited by Ms Arielle : Fri, Jul-12-19 at 17:34.
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