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  #16   ^
Old Wed, Apr-11-18, 19:14
wyatt's Avatar
wyatt wyatt is offline
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Posts: 238
 
Plan: Ketogenic
Stats: 235/220/210 Male 6' 3"
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Location: SF Bay Area
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I liked this article too with a link to the study.

https://chriskresser.com/why-qualit...-comes-to-diet/
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  #17   ^
Old Thu, Apr-12-18, 06:05
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is offline
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Posts: 13,012
 
Plan: mostly milkfat
Stats: 190/152.4/154 Male 67inches
BF:
Progress: 104%
Location: Ontario
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I sort of agree with what Kresser is saying to a point.

Quote:
Just to reiterate, there were no differences between low-carb and low-fat. When the subjects focused on real, whole foods and cut refined grains, sugars, and processed foods out of their diet, they lost significant weight, without having to count calories or restrict energy intake. However, this was based on averages, and does not mean that an individual might not respond better to a low-carb or low-fat diet.


In the A to Z study Gardner observed that the people who lost the most weight were the people who adhered most strictly to their plan. That "this was based on averages" is important, because it applies not just to weight loss results but also to adherence--if, like in the A to Z study, the people who were most adherent lost the most weight, which seems likely, the weight loss might more strongly correlate with level of carb intake in the one group and fat intake in the other. Gardner prescribed a certain definition of "quality" for low carb that I don't entirely agree with--not about the foods that were included, grass fed beef, salmon, olive oil etc. are fine--but I disagree that the foods that he might consider lower quality, like conventional beef or pepperoni sausages and pork rinds and butter would have resulted in less weight loss, or that they couldn't be part of a healthful low carb diet. Dr. Atkins played heavily into the succulence of a low carb diet, the diet proposed by Gardner *might* be a healthier version, but the greater appeal of Atkin's approach, the wider range of choices, being able to go to a fast food joint and just toss the bun makes for easier adherence.
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  #18   ^
Old Thu, Apr-12-18, 10:08
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is online now
Posts: 2,414
 
Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
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Good points and from first-hand experience, the ability to sustain a WOE means that I have choices enabling me to maintain adherence in a variety of circumstances such as when traveling, attending parties or functions where food is served, and eating at restaurants (fast food or traditional sit-down). Having this flexibility with a wider range of choices can make all the difference in being able to adhere.
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  #19   ^
Old Thu, Apr-12-18, 15:32
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deirdra deirdra is offline
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Posts: 3,863
 
Plan: HF/vLC/GF,CF,SF
Stats: 197/136/150 Female 66 inches
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Progress: 130%
Location: Alberta
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The success of any diet or WOE is in the maintaining, not the losing. I was a master at losing on every diet from vegan/10% fat to carnivore but for me, only LCHF real food is sustainable.
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  #20   ^
Old Wed, Apr-25-18, 04:51
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is offline
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Posts: 13,012
 
Plan: mostly milkfat
Stats: 190/152.4/154 Male 67inches
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Progress: 104%
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https://www.sciencedaily.com/releas...80424133550.htm

Quote:
What can a tasty milkshake teach us about the genetics of heart disease?
Study uncovers new gene variants that quietly affect cholesterol

From 2002 to 2005, about 800 people in Minnesota and Utah drank more than 1,500 milkshakes, and they got to say they were doing it for science.

These self-sacrificing study subjects are participants of the Genetics of Lipid-lowering Drugs and Diet Network (GOLDN), and this wasn't their first rodeo. Some of them have been put under the microscope for about 25 years now to help researchers better understand cardiovascular risks.

This time they were helping scientists determine how genes influence cholesterol levels after high-fat meals and how genes affect the response to a medication for lowering triglyceride and bad cholesterol.

Ultimately, the team of medical geneticists at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, University of Alabama at Birmingham, the University of Kentucky, and seven other institutions discovered new uncommon gene variants that affect patients' response to the cholesterol drug. The reported their findings in the Journal of Lipid Research.

Chronically high cholesterol results in the gradual deposition of lipids on artery walls, increasing the risk of heart attacks and stroke. This clogging process is known as atherosclerosis. A diet high in fat is just one of several risk factors. Family history strongly affects a person's risk of developing it.

"Triglyceride and cholesterol levels are influenced by what people eat and whether they take drugs to lower fat and cholesterol," said the study's lead author, Xin Geng, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. "We know, however, that not everyone's triglyceride and cholesterol levels respond the same to diet and drugs. Previous research suggests that these differences in response to diet and drugs may be caused by genetic factors inherited from parents."

While researchers have identified genetic variants that affect lipid responses, the medical geneticists who worked on the milkshake study set out to identify additional variants that have so far escaped detection.

Drinking milkshakes, giving blood

Each GOLDN participant came to the lab with an empty stomach and drank a milkshake concocted from heavy whipping cream, chocolate or strawberry syrup, and crushed ice. More than four-fifths of the calories in the meal came from fat.

The scientists drew their blood before and after the meal and measured high-density lipoprotein (known as "good" cholesterol), low-density lipoprotein (known as "bad" cholesterol) and triglycerides (basically, fat).

They sent the patients home to take fenofibrate, a medication that can lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels, for three weeks. After that treatment, patients returned to the lab for another milkshake and another set of blood draws.

The scientists also sequenced all of the genes and examined the gene expression level in the participants' blood cells.

Novel rare gene variants

"Until recently," said Degui Zhi, senior author from UTHSC at Houston, "it was thought that common genetic variants were the ones that caused variability in people's triglyceride and cholesterol levels."

However, common genetic variants explained less than a quarter of inherited variability in triglyceride levels. "Our hypothesis was that at least some of the 48 percent of unexplained variability could be driven by rare genetic variants, those that occur in less than 5 percent of the population."

Indeed, the researchers found variants of at least three genes that were not very widespread in the study population but did correlate with lipid changes in the people who had them.

"We found that variants in one gene, called SIPA1L2, predicted triglyceride level changes after consuming the milkshake. Variants in another gene, ITGA7, predicted LDL-cholesterol level ("bad" cholesterol) changes after taking the drug. And variants in a third gene, CEP72, predicted triglyceride response when comparing the pre-fenofibrate milkshake experiment to the post-fenofibrate milkshake experiment," said Ryan Irvin, another collaborator from UAB.

The researchers say their findings should spur other scientists to look for additional rare gene variants, including non-protein-coding DNA that fell outside the scope of this study.

They also emphasize that their study population was not diverse. Most of the GOLDN participants are white. Looking for rare variants in other populations may turn up additional important genes.

"Future studies can begin where we left off by trying to uncover exactly how the metabolic pathways and mechanisms these genes are part of interact with dietary fat and fenofibrate to change triglyceride and cholesterol levels," said Donna Arnett, dean of the UK College of Public Health and the GOLDN principal investigator. "Armed with this knowledge, we will be one step closer to finding new ways to prevent and/or treat unhealthy triglyceride and cholesterol levels."

The research was sponsored by the National Institutes of Health.


https://www.sciencedaily.com/releas...80424133550.htm

More milkshakes....

Even a lipophobic heart disease researcher shouldn't be propogating the clogged pipes analogy for atherosclerosis. If people take what's supposed to be a simple metaphor literally, and you keep using the metaphor, at that point you are flat out lying.
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