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  #1   ^
Old Sat, Dec-18-21, 08:16
bkloots's Avatar
bkloots bkloots is offline
Posts: 10,039
 
Plan: LC/HiProtein
Stats: 195/156/150 Female 63in
BF:
Progress: 87%
Location: Kansas City, MO
Default New Year Resolution: Learn to Cook

Quote:
Looking to my experiences working with thousands of patients over the course of the past dozen years, it's clear that liking the life you're living while you're losing weight is the key to keeping it off.--Dr. Yoni Freedhoff
This quote has been in my signature forever. I'm highlighting it now. It's one of the key things I know about LC living.

When my current "mentee" tells me she "doesn't cook" my hope diminishes that she will be successful in the long term with reducing and sustaining her weight.

Making tasty meals--even for a family of fussy eaters--doesn't have to be difficult or time consuming. I'm not anyone's Mom, but I hope it's not impossible that a parent can set the stage for lifelong good eating habits by introducing LC foods even kiddos will eat.

What do you think?
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  #2   ^
Old Sat, Dec-18-21, 08:49
cotonpal's Avatar
cotonpal cotonpal is online now
Posts: 5,007
 
Plan: very low carb real food
Stats: 245/125/135 Female 62
BF:
Progress: 109%
Location: Vermont
Default

Not every meal has to be a peak experience or a complicated endeavor. In fact none of them have to. It is possible to prepare simple tasty meals that are low carb and that require minimal time and effort. That's been my approach. Of course I only have to satisfy myself but I do not see anything about my approach that wouldn't also work for families of more than one person. It comes down to commitment. If you are committed to healthy low carb eating for you and your family you can find a way to make to work. It may take some extra time at first as you figure it all out but it will soon become a habit.
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  #3   ^
Old Sat, Dec-18-21, 10:15
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 3,791
 
Plan: Very LC, Higher Protein
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
Default

I agree with Jean and the benefit of preparing your own foods and meals enables complete control and awareness of food types, quality, and other ingredients. Heating up things that a manufacturer or other food prep entity has prepared leaves one at the mercy of the food maker who usually has very different objectives to establish a cost point in selling the food to make a business profitable. I don't always trust the ingredient list.

Learning to cook and prepare simple, healthy, whole foods is not difficult, but I understand why those who have never done this are reluctant. My fortune is that I was brought up in a family who ate good, healthy foods and encouraged my siblings and me to become involved in meal prep at an early age. That has made all the difference, and we've passed that along to our own kids and grand kids. My grand daughter (now 6 years old) and son spend time together preparing dinner, and she has a palate far beyond her years. These simple activities give young people confidence and an understanding about what is good and healthy that will be beneficial for the rest of their lives.

Unfortunately, the availability of pre-prepped meals ready in little time has trained a few generations that they can microwave something to eat quickly, satisfy their hunger, and don't need to know what's in it as long as it's palatable.
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  #4   ^
Old Sat, Dec-18-21, 14:35
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 16,151
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/230/200 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 45%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

It is really rather easy.

I taught my kids to cook thru fun things like turning pasta maker and stirring a batch of homemade brownies.....they are now older teens and can cook. Their preference is a pan fried steak and a mix of sauted fresh veggies, seasoned by the umpteen options on twirly by the stove top.

Basics include microwaved Irish potato or sweet potato.

Beyond basics is just a willingness to learn new techniques, like a greased potato set on oven rack next to a roast beef. Just need a meat thermometer.

Start building utensils, pots, pans and specialty items .....

We made lasagne roll ups with a bescemel sauce.sirry, can't find correct spelling.

One made the beschemel sauce...his first time. Less lumpy than my efforts, lol. And other teen helped with prepping 9x13, and rolling up lasagne. He wanted ham added to recipe so he got out the ham and added julienned slices to filling. I made filling and homemade pasta dough.

Pasta is so easy. Flour and eggs. ( I don't buy pasta anymore so homemade was only option. ) Roll out flat. Cut with pizza cutter or knife.

Learning to cook is easy these days. Wonderful YouTube chefs and homecooks sharing the full details that a cookbook cannot convey.

"Look up a recipe" means google to my teens. They like the YouTube format....hard to go wrong.
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  #5   ^
Old Sat, Dec-18-21, 21:24
bkloots's Avatar
bkloots bkloots is offline
Posts: 10,039
 
Plan: LC/HiProtein
Stats: 195/156/150 Female 63in
BF:
Progress: 87%
Location: Kansas City, MO
Default

Ms. Arielle, what is this “pasta” you speak of?? 😂
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  #6   ^
Old Sun, Dec-19-21, 03:36
Kristine's Avatar
Kristine Kristine is offline
Forum Moderator
Posts: 23,314
 
Plan: Primal/P:E
Stats: 171/155/155 Female 5'7"
BF:
Progress: 100%
Location: Southern Ontario, Canada
Default

That's bang-on, Barbara. I have a similar quote in my sig from Dr Ted Naiman: "You are only going to maintain your results if you enjoyed the process that got you there in the first place." One of my favourite pieces of advice to someone who's overwhelmed with the idea of going LC, especially just starting out, is to avoid fancy-sounding recipes and just make simple food. If you enjoy cooking, great - go make those labour-of-love dishes like bacon-wrapped jalapeno poppers or zucchini lasagna. Otherwise, KIS. There are lots of ready-made, pre-prepped groceries you can buy.

This also applies if you "hate cooking." I generally enjoy cooking, but I work a seasonal job that's exhausting while I'm working. I do food prep and a bit of cooking on Sunday, and that's it. The rest of the week, it's whatever I made Sunday, something from the freezer, or something just as easy. There's nothing wrong with calling a few of the following a meal: some cold cuts, cheese, boiled eggs, some raw veggies, berries, a dish of cottage cheese, Greek yogurt, pork rinds and salsa... imperfect LC is infinitely better than the SAD. Don't let perfect be the enemy of good.

If you hate cooking, stop calling it "cooking" and start calling it "preparing your food." Even if you wanted garbagey mac n' cheese from a box, you'd still have to boil the water, stir the pasta, drain it, prepare your sauce, and clean up afterwards. If you can take the time to do that, you can make something healthier with no more effort or cost. It's an excuse. Plain and simple.

Pick your favourite easier foods, maybe scrambled eggs or roasted chicken, and learn to make them well. Make those your staples. Keep a written list or something online that'll remind you of dishes you really like. It's funny how you can just 'forget' that you really liked (this or that easy recipe.) That's probably all the cooking knowledge you need to have to be successful.

I don't want to hijack your thread, but on my back burner (pardon the pun) has been a post/thread about how to make the easiest, quickest meals.

Last edited by Kristine : Sun, Dec-19-21 at 03:52.
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  #7   ^
Old Sun, Dec-19-21, 08:08
bkloots's Avatar
bkloots bkloots is offline
Posts: 10,039
 
Plan: LC/HiProtein
Stats: 195/156/150 Female 63in
BF:
Progress: 87%
Location: Kansas City, MO
Default

Thanks for the thoughts, Kristine. There is a cooking forum on this site, which I haven’t used. I’ll be sure to check it out.

In a world of digital devices, I use the messiest recipe collection there is: a pile of print-outs. Mostly stained, wrinkled, and scribbled on. However, looking for “what to eat” I can usually recover a favorite I’ve forgotten about by riffling through the pages. Many of them have titles that begin with the word EASY.😋

LC Zucchini Lasagna? Have that printout. But it always looks…complicated. I even bought a mandoline slicer to make it…one time!🤪

My LC routine is minimalist. Most people probably eat about the same things every day. Reducing decisions is also a “secret” of LC sustainability.

Eat what you love. Love what you eat. LC version!
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  #8   ^
Old Sun, Dec-19-21, 09:01
Ambulo's Avatar
Ambulo Ambulo is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 2,141
 
Plan: LerC, TRE, IF
Stats: 150/124/120 Female 64 inches
BF:
Progress: 87%
Location: the North, England
Default

Cooking is turning something that is inedible raw (most people regard raw fish, meat and most vegetables inedible raw) palatable by applying heat for a sufficiently long period.

Cooking for me is: melt a little fat in a frying pan, then add slab of meat or fish. Cover with lid. After about 20 minutes, add green vegetables. After about 20 minutes out into plate and eat. I use a mixture of spinach, broccoli and Brussels sprouts which I take out of the freezer the night before and defrost at room temp in a pasta drainer, excess liquid is discarded. Salt, pepper, herbs and spices as desired. Or not.

No weighing, no measuring, no fancy recipes from glossy magazines. But if you enjoy that sort of cooking the sky is the limit.
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  #9   ^
Old Sun, Jan-09-22, 15:40
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 13,581
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/133/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 124%
Location: USA
Default

I've learned to grill meat, bake chicken, make cheesecake. It's easy. And takes LESS time than getting takeout, in the comfort of home.
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  #10   ^
Old Fri, Jan-14-22, 01:23
JustAGirl JustAGirl is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 709
 
Plan: Paleo
Stats: 110/107/105 Female 63
BF:
Progress: 60%
Location: usa
Default

The delicious flavors of real foods (fresh veggies and meats) can be enjoyed raw or simply steamed or baked.

Fake white foods (pasta, rice, potato, bread) require effort to find the right sauces and toppings to make them palatable.

I never used to have pasta without some sort of sauce on it. Now, I eat veggies and meats in their pure state all the time and find them delicious.

Last edited by JustAGirl : Fri, Jan-14-22 at 01:28.
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  #11   ^
Old Fri, Jan-14-22, 05:04
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 13,581
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/133/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 124%
Location: USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cotonpal
Not every meal has to be a peak experience or a complicated endeavor. In fact none of them have to.


Exactly.

Grilling a slab of meat on the stove is as simple as it gets. In our house, we love that deadly red meat. I learned how from Chef Ramsey's Kitchen Nightmares, the only "reality" show we watch. (There's actually some reality in it.)

Rare - front part of chin

Medium - end of nose

Well - forehead

Little tricks like that make all the difference when we are learning.
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  #12   ^
Old Fri, Jan-14-22, 06:04
Kristine's Avatar
Kristine Kristine is offline
Forum Moderator
Posts: 23,314
 
Plan: Primal/P:E
Stats: 171/155/155 Female 5'7"
BF:
Progress: 100%
Location: Southern Ontario, Canada
Default

Probably an important point is to keep notes, maybe just keep a notepad and pencil in your kitchen, so you can learn what works in your kitchen, with your equipment. For whatever reason, every time I've tried those steak cooking tricks comparing it to touching your hand, I still get it wrong. Way over-or under-cooked. So I memorized this rule of thumb, all around the number 3:
- Preheat the oven to 300 F, also preheat a cast iron pan on the stove.
- Throw your seasoned steak on the pan for 3 min.
- Flip it over, cook for 3 min.
- Put it in the oven for 3 min.
- Put on your plate and tent for about 3 min under foil.
- Optional but highly recommended: throw some butter in the pan, sautee some mushrooms/peppers/onions if you have them. Add a splash of Worcestershire sauce if you have it. You can skip this, but it makes it feel much fancier.

This is for cooking to medium-ish, for NICE steaks like striploin that are always cut the same way from my grocery store. Anything 'crappier' goes in the Instant Pot. Even easier! Throw in some liquid, pressure cook the heck out of it. You pretty much can't go wrong.

Last edited by Kristine : Fri, Jan-14-22 at 06:14.
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  #13   ^
Old Sun, Jan-16-22, 08:32
bkloots's Avatar
bkloots bkloots is offline
Posts: 10,039
 
Plan: LC/HiProtein
Stats: 195/156/150 Female 63in
BF:
Progress: 87%
Location: Kansas City, MO
Default

For anyone hanging out at this thread, I confess my latest gadget adventure:

Chaffle Mini-Waffle Maker

There's a long thread about this elsewhere.
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  #14   ^
Old Sun, Jan-16-22, 09:36
deirdra's Avatar
deirdra deirdra is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 4,177
 
Plan: HF/vLC/GF,CF,SF
Stats: 197/136/150 Female 66 inches
BF:
Progress: 130%
Location: Alberta
Default

The daunting part for some is the thought that they'll need to prepare & cook 7-21 meals a week. I cook eggs & burgers in real time, but mostly cook roasts & stews in big batches a few times a month and freeze the intentional leftovers in single servings to reheat & eat. The pre-cooked meat/poultry/fish can be added to a salad or steamed with some flash-frozen low-carb vegetables and voila, dinner in ~3 minutes. Virtually all of my protein sources are bought when they are on sale. I have a Starfrit burger-shaper that I use to shape ground beef, chicken or turkey (on sale!) that I season myself and make into patties (each w/30g of protein), and freeze raw. 8 minutes from frozen to done in my George Forman grill. Yes, my freezer is full and my fridge half empty, but I never have an excuse that there are no real, on-plan foods ready to eat.
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  #15   ^
Old Mon, Jan-17-22, 11:25
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 13,581
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/133/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 124%
Location: USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by deirdra
cook roasts & stews in big batches a few times a month and freeze the intentional leftovers in single servings to reheat & eat. The pre-cooked meat/poultry/fish can be added to a salad or steamed with some flash-frozen low-carb vegetables and voila, dinner in ~3 minutes.


That's the way to get your own frozen meals that actually taste good.
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