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  #1   ^
Old Tue, May-07-19, 17:31
PhyllisK PhyllisK is offline
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Plan: Atkins
Stats: 198/192/150 Female 5' 2"
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Default Diabetes and LC diet question

I was diagnosed Type 2 diabetes a couple of weeks ago and am doing low carb. Blood sugars are coming down but I have a question:

How does, or does, high fat consumption play into blood sugar counts? Can I have cream in my coffee, a good ribeye steak, butter, salad dressing? I know that's allowed low carb, but what about with diabetes? I have been indulging and am having some success. Not dramatic or speedy, but some success. I am meeting with a dietitian tomorrow but wanted to do some research first. Thanks
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  #2   ^
Old Wed, May-08-19, 04:19
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
To Good Health!
Posts: 11,202
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
Location: NC
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Good Morning, Phyllis,

There are many ways to answer your question, beside fat has no impact, but here is Dr. Sarah Hallberg's simple graph:

Quote:
What happens when we eat carbohydrates, protein and fat?

"Your blood insulin responds very differently to different macronutrients. Fat does not impact blood insulin levels. Carbs have a high impact, and protein impacts them moderately, but fat? No impact!" https://blog.virtahealth.com/revers...nd-blood-sugar/


The entire article and its videos linked above is excellent explanation of how you can reverse diabetes with diet. Dr. Hallberg of Indiana University is best known for an 18 minute TedTalk, Reversing Type 2 diabetes starts with ignoring the Guidelines https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=da1vvigy5tQ It has almost 5 million views (but your nutritionist likely won't be thrilled with it )


Also, if you re-read the Guide to Diabetes I linked yesterday (an underline here is a hot-link to more information) look at Dr. Eenfeldt's links too (his website links are Blue print, just to confuse us )
https://www.dietdoctor.com/diabetes

In the section "Where Sugar in your blood comes from"

Quote:
The only reason to continue to give this bad advice is the lingering fear of natural fat. If you’re going to avoid fat you need to eat more carbohydrates in order to get satiated. But in recent years the old theory about fat being dangerous has been proven incorrect and is today on its way out. Low-fat products are simply unnecessary. So this reason doesn’t hold up either.

Here is that link about Why Fat is Your Friend: https://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb/fat-your-friend


You could get technical and prove it yourself by eating foods with one those three macros,and testing blood sugar before and 1,2,3 hours. But it doesn't have to be complicated...all you want to do is Just. Eat. Real. Food.

Last edited by JEY100 : Wed, May-08-19 at 05:38.
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  #3   ^
Old Wed, May-08-19, 04:35
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
To Good Health!
Posts: 11,202
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
Location: NC
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To continue on Just. Eat. Real. Food.

From all of Nina Teicholz's work on trying to revise the US Dietary Guidelines, I understand that any facilities, schools, military that have government funding must follow the USDA Guidelines, so an important question to ask your Nutritionist is about foods purchased and used for meals.

First, I assumed that you are eating meals in the Independant Living Dining Room..is that correct? or do you have a kitchenette and make some meals yourself? or are you in a house and not provided any meals. There are all types of independent living, and you will be able to do LC in any situation, but the dining room may be required to provide low fat foods...and you need to learn what those are to avoid them.

I ask because if your new home must buy guideline food, you may find that butter is actually margarine, mayonnaise is "reduced-fat" and loaded with sugar, same with peanut butter, eggs for breakfast will be in short supply, etc. So if your nutritionist agrees to your managing diabetes with a Low Carb Diet, you should also be sure sugar is not coming along with the fats. You blame yourself for understandable stress and grief eating, but if I read your introduction correctly, it has only been the recent three years you are in independent living, and now your first diabetes diagnosis at 70. You may want to ask the nutritionist about the foods they buy, ask for a tour of their pantry.

I will look forward to hearing her reaction

Last edited by JEY100 : Wed, May-08-19 at 10:37.
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  #4   ^
Old Wed, May-08-19, 04:53
thud123's Avatar
thud123 thud123 is offline
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Plan: ~25NC/IF
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Quote:
How does, or does, high fat consumption play into blood sugar counts?

It's my basic understanding that, all things being equal, which they never are, on low carb you will reduce the amount of carbohydrate you consume, you only need a certain amount of protein a day for body maintenance another controversial topic on exact amount for the "average person" of which I have met none.

So, without throwing weight loss into the matter (metabolizing your own fat) you will need to eat the 3rd macro to meet your daily, ever changing, sustenance - You will eat FAT.

Sorry for the convolutions but there you have it from my perspective today.
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  #5   ^
Old Wed, May-08-19, 10:16
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
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Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/188/160 Female 5'4"
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Progress: 44%
Location: Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhyllisK
I am meeting with a dietitian tomorrow but wanted to do some research first. Thanks


Sorry to tell you but the dietitian with tell you to eat a low fat diet and keep taking meds. That method just keeps people sick and they only get sicker because all of the carbs in that way of eating, which turns into sugar in the body and they won't recognize or admit that part at all.
Medicine is not a cure, only a band-aid.
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  #6   ^
Old Wed, May-08-19, 13:53
Bonnie OFS Bonnie OFS is offline
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Plan: Dr. Bernstein
Stats: 188/150/135 Female 5 ft 4 inches
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Location: NE WA
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While fat has no impact on blood glucose, protein does. I'm still working on not eating so much of it.
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  #7   ^
Old Wed, May-08-19, 18:17
Sunny59 Sunny59 is offline
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Plan: Atkins
Stats: 327.0/324.8/120 Female 62
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Bonnie, I couldn't agree more.. when I tell people that steak elevates my blood sugar, they assume its a marinade or barbecue sauce.. when I only use salt and pepper...
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  #8   ^
Old Thu, May-09-19, 07:21
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
To Good Health!
Posts: 11,202
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
Location: NC
Default

Virta Health graph above shows a "moderate" response for protein...slower to rise, doesn't get as high as Carbs, but it also lasts longer. Or you could look at that response as less chance of a fast blood sugar crash following the fast peak of carbs.

I would suggest that Phyllis take the time to somewhat track how much quality protein she is getting if eating in the facility dining room. If the nutritionist follows US Dietary guidelines, red meat or egg protein may be limited. In the past three years, were there more "whole grain" pasta meals than plain hamburgers? Her appetite may have been stimulated by carb heavy meals in the 55-60% guideline range. Maybe a simple focus on more protein and removing the starchy side dish would be the only adjustment needed?
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