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  #1   ^
Old Thu, Apr-25-19, 04:12
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
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Default American Diabetes Association endorses low-carb diet as option

https://www.dietdoctor.com/american...-diet-as-option

Early Release form of the Consensus Report. Dr. William Yancy from Duke DFC is one of the authors. Frequent Dr. Westman co-author on years of LC studies.

Quote:
A recent consensus statement from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that people with diabetes be offered individualized medical nutrition therapy, rather than be given the “one-size-fits-all” advice to count carbohydrates and restrict calories. Included in options that should be offered to patients are low-carbohydrate diets.

Diabetes Care: Nutrition therapy for adults with diabetes or prediabetes: A consensus report

This is a major change from previous guidance from the ADA stating that “Low-carbohydrate diets (restricting total carbohydrate to <130 g/day) are not recommended [because] they eliminate many foods that are important sources of energy, fiber, vitamins, and minerals and are important in dietary palatability.”

Also missing from this report is language from previous guidance expressing concern that low-carbohydrate diets were unsafe because the brain “needs” 130 grams of dietary carbohydrate per day. In fact, this report clearly states that, in the context of very low carbohydrate intake, the brain’s requirement for glucose can be met by the body’s own metabolic processes.

The report noted that low-carbohydrate and very low-carbohydrate eating patterns “are among the most studied eating patterns for type 2 diabetes.” Even though the report defined “low-carbohydrate” as up to 40% of calories from carbohydrate, which is far more than most low-carbohydrate diets recommend, these kinds of eating patterns were still shown to lower triglycerides, raise HDL-C (the “good” cholesterol), lower blood pressure, and result in greater reduction of diabetes medications when compared to low-fat diets.

No matter what eating pattern a patient chooses to follow, the report emphasizes that nutrition therapy is a “fundamental” part of managing diabetes and that all diets should be tailored to the individual. However, the report makes an important point about carbohydrate intake for people with diabetes. It notes that for people with diabetes, eating fewer carbohydrate-laden foods is beneficial no matter what the overall eating pattern is otherwise:

Reducing overall carbohydrate intake for individuals with diabetes has demonstrated the most evidence for improving glycemia and may be applied in a variety of eating patterns that meet individual needs and preferences.

The report also offers recommendations for those diagnosed with prediabetes. Both standard nutrition therapy (modeled on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans) and individualized medical nutrition therapy are approved approaches. This means that individuals who are interested in stopping the progress of prediabetes by using a reduced-carbohydrate eating pattern can work with a dietitian to create one that is enjoyable and sustainable.

This report follows close on the heels of another report out of Western Australia that recommends low-carbohydrate diets as one of three options formally offered to people diagnosed with diabetes. The Australian report also makes the goal of dietary intervention remission, not just management, of the disease, a point that is not raised in the ADA consensus statement.

Diet Doctor: Landmark diabetes report says low-carb is a top option

The ADA’s consensus report was written by a group of 14 experts led by Dr. William S. Yancy, Jr., who is a member of Diet Doctor’s medical review board.

We are pleased to offer resources to help people with diabetes and prediabetes reduce the carbohydrate content of their diet in ways that can be adapted to many different eating patterns. We also applaud the ADA for updating its guidance to include low-carbohydrate and very low-carbohydrate diets as safe and effective options for people with either of these conditions.

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  #2   ^
Old Thu, Apr-25-19, 10:42
Bonnie OFS Bonnie OFS is offline
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Thanks for posting this! I'm so happy to see the ADA come around. Some years ago I took free classes for low income senior diabetics. I did learn things from the classes by a pharmacist, a physical therapy person, & a doctor who explained - in graphic detail & with pictures - the side-effects of uncontrolled diabetes, but the dietary advice was awful - as were the high carb lunches provided. I ate the inside of the sandwiches (meat, cheese, lettuce), took the (white!) bread home for the chickens, & skipped the fruit.

If they offer the classes again, it would be interesting to join just to see if the new advice has trickled down to the nutritionists.

I know that at least 1 person in that class - who would probably have benefited from a good lc diet - has died as a result of his uncontrolled t2 diabetes.
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  #3   ^
Old Thu, Apr-25-19, 12:02
jschwab jschwab is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonnie OFS
Thanks for posting this! I'm so happy to see the ADA come around. Some years ago I took free classes for low income senior diabetics. I did learn things from the classes by a pharmacist, a physical therapy person, & a doctor who explained - in graphic detail & with pictures - the side-effects of uncontrolled diabetes, but the dietary advice was awful - as were the high carb lunches provided. I ate the inside of the sandwiches (meat, cheese, lettuce), took the (white!) bread home for the chickens, & skipped the fruit.

If they offer the classes again, it would be interesting to join just to see if the new advice has trickled down to the nutritionists.

I know that at least 1 person in that class - who would probably have benefited from a good lc diet - has died as a result of his uncontrolled t2 diabetes.


That is the part that gets me. Thousand of people have died following these old guidelines. It's negligence, IMO, and they should all be put in jail not just be able to issue a "mea culpa".
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  #4   ^
Old Thu, Apr-25-19, 12:19
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Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
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I remember my DH's great uncle who had diabetes and was then on in-home dialysis. His claim that the every morning Oatmeal was keeping him healthy really made me question what kind of advise he was getting.
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  #5   ^
Old Thu, Apr-25-19, 12:32
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cotonpal cotonpal is online now
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Plan: very low carb real food
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meme#1
I remember my DH's great uncle who had diabetes and was then on in-home dialysis. His claim that the every morning Oatmeal was keeping him healthy really made me question what kind of advise he was getting.


My elderly downstairs neighbor has diabetes. He has oatmeal for breakfast every day. There is nothing about his diet that is helping to either optimize or even maintain his current level of health (bladder cancer, early stage dementia, copd, congestive heart failure among others I suspect). His diet is just adding to all his health issues. His wife is just home from 6 weeks spent in a hospital and then rehab following a heart attack. The dietary advice she was given is terrible, the low fat no salt mantra. It's all so sad. Their daughter, who is staying with them to help out, also has diabetes and some form of heart disease. She is in her 60's, a few years younger than I am and her diet is no better. Son, also in his 60's, is also in terrible health. When there is dietary information that could help so many people it does seem criminal not only not to disseminate it widely but instead to advise a diet that is creating the problems and making people sicker.

Last edited by cotonpal : Thu, Apr-25-19 at 13:16.
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  #6   ^
Old Thu, Apr-25-19, 12:42
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
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Plan: Atkins DANDR
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Sadly, they have to search out the information like we have because it certainly isn't being offered freely by the medical field, probably out of ignorance but mostly out of "standard of care".

If we offer info to these sick individuals, they look at us like who are we to question a medical doctors advise, surely they are the expert!
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  #7   ^
Old Thu, Apr-25-19, 13:21
cotonpal's Avatar
cotonpal cotonpal is online now
Posts: 4,567
 
Plan: very low carb real food
Stats: 245/128/135 Female 62
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meme#1
Sadly, they have to search out the information like we have because it certainly isn't being offered freely by the medical field, probably out of ignorance but mostly out of "standard of care".

If we offer info to these sick individuals, they look at us like who are we to question a medical doctors advise, surely they are the expert!


What I've come to realize is that we are the lucky ones who know enough to go seek out the information and then follow it. My neighbors are very nice people and intelligent but without much education (they are both in the upper 80's and grew up very poor). They don't have a computer and believe in the standard of care advice. My friend, the wife, knows I eat "funny" and sometimes asks me what it is I eat but I wouldn't start telling her to eat other than the doctor advises. I would probably just confuse her and her husband is definitely too stubborn to change anything.
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  #8   ^
Old Thu, Apr-25-19, 14:11
jschwab jschwab is offline
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Plan: Atkins72/Paleo/NoGrain/IF
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meme#1
Sadly, they have to search out the information like we have because it certainly isn't being offered freely by the medical field, probably out of ignorance but mostly out of "standard of care".

If we offer info to these sick individuals, they look at us like who are we to question a medical doctors advise, surely they are the expert!


I think that's a bit true but I've met a bunch of people without much education who have never researched low carb that balked ASAP against the dietary advice simply because they had done the basic diabetes education and realized that sugar/carbs was what was raising their blood sugar. I mean, that's all you really need to know - the proof is right there on your glucometer. Meanwhile, people with advanced degrees in health fields - even doctors - are sucking down the carbs even though they've researched every low-carb diet in the world. I think it's more about the personality and being willing to see what's right in front of you. You don't have to join a low-carb forum to realize rice and bananas will spike your blood like crazy. You just have to want to be healthy. People want what they want.


At the same time, the ADA has put a glow on carb addiction that is criminal.
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  #9   ^
Old Sat, Apr-27-19, 07:32
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
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Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
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This is the first media news I have found about this, emphasis on:
No 'One-Size-Fits-All' Diet for Diabetics, Expert Panel Says

https://www.usnews.com/news/health-...pert-panel-says
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  #10   ^
Old Tue, Apr-30-19, 03:51
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
To Good Health!
Posts: 11,202
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
Location: NC
Default

This month's Diabetes Care Journal http://care.diabetesjournals.org/co...current-issue=y

has a section titled: Continuing Evolution of Nutritional Therapy for Diabetes leading off with Nutritional Strategies for Prevention and Management of Diabetes: Consensus and Uncertainties by Frank Hu (Harvard plant-based if not vegetarian supporter) and Judith Wylie-Rosett. It downplays of the importance of the consensus report. "The ADA has indicated, A consensus report is not an ADA position and represents expert opinion only” and does not include the ADA evidence-grading system (7)."


Why we see no press-releases from the ADA?? So if you want a doctor to support you in VLC eating for diabetes control, will still need to seek them out on your own and provide this evidence.
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  #11   ^
Old Tue, Apr-30-19, 05:08
soapluvr1 soapluvr1 is offline
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Excellent news. Thanks for posting.
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