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  #61   ^
Old Sun, Nov-03-19, 09:11
Bob-a-rama's Avatar
Bob-a-rama Bob-a-rama is offline
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I'll read "Wheat Belly"

But I got the 99% by reading reports from the American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine and the Life Extension Foundation.

I have never seen gluten in the ingredients of any toothpaste I've ever purchased, and I always read labels.

There might be dozens of ways wheat might be bad for people, but I'll go with the A4A and LEF in that about 1% of the population has a gluten sensitivity unless something can convince me otherwise.

That doesn't mean I'm going to eat bread. Too many carbs is the main reason, others don't matter after that.

Bob
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  #62   ^
Old Sun, Nov-03-19, 09:21
Bonnie OFS Bonnie OFS is offline
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Plan: Dr. Bernstein
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I have a friend who could be a poster child for dietary fads. She jumps on every "health" band wagon that comes along, spending lots of money on pills, juices, whatever. She never sticks to one for very long. We were in a Bible study/weight loss group at our church. At the end of it (6 months later I think, & none of had lost any weight), she said, "We need to celebrate - let's go to Golden Corral!" (If one isn't in your area, it's an all-you-can-eat buffet.)

A lot of people celebrate weight loss with food & start the whole cycle over again. I have to be careful of that pitfall myself. But after I was diagnosed with diabetes, I slowly (way too slowly!), started eating better. In spite of being obese, changing my diet to lose weight wasn't something I could stick to. But changing my diet to stay healthy & alive - that was another matter.

I'm gluten-free by default since I don't eat grains at all. That means I don't eat commercially made gluten-free "breads" - they are usually made with other grains. I started this WOE making a lot of fake breads, but soon tired of them. They are a lot of work & don't really have a bread mouth feel.
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  #63   ^
Old Sun, Nov-03-19, 10:04
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Calianna Calianna is offline
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Plan: Atkins-ish (hypoglycemia)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob-a-rama
I'll read "Wheat Belly"

But I got the 99% by reading reports from the American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine and the Life Extension Foundation.

I have never seen gluten in the ingredients of any toothpaste I've ever purchased, and I always read labels.

There might be dozens of ways wheat might be bad for people, but I'll go with the A4A and LEF in that about 1% of the population has a gluten sensitivity unless something can convince me otherwise.

That doesn't mean I'm going to eat bread. Too many carbs is the main reason, others don't matter after that.

Bob

I suspect that 99% number actually refers to the fact that 99% of the population does not have celiac disease. In other words, they don't have a completely debilitating, violent, gut damaging reaction to gluten.



However, there's plenty of other ways to experience a sensitivity to gluten which don't necessarily involve days of bloating and explosive diarrhea every time they eat something that so much as touched equipment that touched a gluten containing ingredient. Hence the term gluten sensitivity, which applies to other ways that gluten can cause havoc in the body, ranging from mild problems, to harsh symptoms that fall just short of qualifying as celiac.



That doesn't mean I think those who have some kind of uncomfortable reaction to gluten (but don't officially have celiac), should just shrug their shoulders and eat wheat with wild abandon, especially once they figure out they feel better without it. It's their decision of course - but I personally wouldn't be anxious to eat gluten, knowing it was going to make me feel bad, if I could possibly avoid eating it, and would therefore be eating gluten free. I also don't believe that their less-than-full-celiac symptoms should be scoffed, simply because they aren't among the 1% who absolutely MUST avoid gluten due to celiac.
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  #64   ^
Old Sun, Nov-03-19, 10:17
cotonpal's Avatar
cotonpal cotonpal is online now
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Plan: very low carb real food
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calianna
I suspect that 99% number actually refers to the fact that 99% of the population does not have celiac disease. In other words, they don't have a completely debilitating, violent, gut damaging reaction to gluten.


The 1% figure is what is usually given for the prevalence of celiac disease. The prevalence of non-celiac gluten sensitivity is unknown but assumed by most researchers to be even higher. Given that non-celiac gluten sensitivity has only been recognized as a legitimate condition for less than a decade and that no accurate testing method exists to establish a diagnosis other than a food challenge, there really is no way to accurately estimate its prevalence. Here's one article on the topic.

https://www.verywellhealth.com/how-...sitivity-562965

Scoffing at people who have experienced symptoms of disease that conventional medicine cannot accurately diagnose is common, and as Calliana says:

" I also don't believe that their less-than-full-celiac symptoms should be scoffed, simply because they aren't among the 1% who absolutely MUST avoid gluten due to celiac."
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  #65   ^
Old Sun, Nov-03-19, 11:39
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Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cotonpal
The 1% figure is what is usually given for the prevalence of celiac disease. The prevalence of non-celiac gluten sensitivity is unknown but assumed by most researchers to be even higher. Given that non-celiac gluten sensitivity has only been recognized as a legitimate condition for less than a decade and that no accurate testing method exists to establish a diagnosis other than a food challenge, there really is no way to accurately estimate its prevalence. Here's one article on the topic.

https://www.verywellhealth.com/how-...sitivity-562965

Scoffing at people who have experienced symptoms of disease that conventional medicine cannot accurately diagnose is common, and as Calliana says:

" I also don't believe that their less-than-full-celiac symptoms should be scoffed, simply because they aren't among the 1% who absolutely MUST avoid gluten due to celiac."


Great article Jean and this is the bottom line for people who are ill:

"Symptoms of gluten sensitivity in this population can include digestive problems, headaches, rashes, and eczema-like skin symptoms, brain fog and fatigue, Dr. Fasano says. Almost one-third of those he's diagnosed as gluten-sensitive report brain fog and headaches as symptoms, he says."

My DD3 has all of these symptoms!
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  #66   ^
Old Sun, Nov-03-19, 12:11
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Wheat Belly dives into many disease states. The one that shocked my socks off was: cateracts. Like the test for A1c, glycation , if that is the right term, occurs all thru the body, not just the blood cells. That means cateracts are avoid able and another human malady due to modern foods.
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  #67   ^
Old Mon, Nov-04-19, 03:22
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle
Wheat Belly dives into many disease states. The one that shocked my socks off was: cateracts. Like the test for A1c, glycation , if that is the right term, occurs all thru the body, not just the blood cells. That means cateracts are avoid able and another human malady due to modern foods.


A personal way Wheat Belly helped me was considering gluten when I got stomach bloat after a meal; something I would have only known because, thanks to Atkins, I was fitting into tighter pants!

This led to me going gluten free and so many things improved: arthritis, sleep, digestion. Yet, if you had asked me if eating wheat "gave me symptoms" I would have honestly answered, "No, I'm fine."
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  #68   ^
Old Mon, Nov-04-19, 07:55
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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I kept glutin on hand to make lc desserts.....until reading WHEAT BELLY. I thought grains were just bad for the waistline, then read Wheat Belly....
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  #69   ^
Old Mon, Nov-04-19, 09:28
Bonnie OFS Bonnie OFS is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle
Wheat Belly dives into many disease states. The one that shocked my socks off was: cateracts. Like the test for A1c, glycation , if that is the right term, occurs all thru the body, not just the blood cells. That means cateracts are avoid able and another human malady due to modern foods.


That I hadn't known! My eye doc recently told me that the slight dimming of my sight is not from my old glasses (tho they didn't help), but from the beginning of cataracts. When I read Wheat Belly I probably skimmed over the cataract info because I didn't think it applied to me.

I'll have to re-read it. Are there any other books/websites that have cataract/diet info?
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  #70   ^
Old Mon, Nov-04-19, 09:33
Bob-a-rama's Avatar
Bob-a-rama Bob-a-rama is offline
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Plan: Keto (Atkins Induction)
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I definitely don't scoff at people who don't eat gluten because it has adverse effects on their body.

I for one listen to my body and don't eat a lot of foods that others enjoy.

But food fads do go through a phases, and there are plenty of people who avoid gluten just because it's big in the media now.

I bought a can of olives, that said gluten free. Come on, naturally ripe olives in brine. These never had gluten.

Gluten free pops up on a lot of foods that never had a trace of it.

That makes it a fad diet in my estimation.

However, the people who do have a problem with it, the other 99% or whatever that amounts to, should avoid it. Others like myself avoid bread not because of the gluten, which doesn't seem to affect me, but to the carbs which definitely do affect me.

Bob

Off but related rant. A lot of people are allergic to peanuts. But why does a company need to put "Allergen information: contains peanuts" on a jar of peanut butter. It's called "Peanut butter" the stated ingredients are "Roasted Peanuts and Salt", isn't that enough? (please this is a light-hearted fun rant - don't take it seriously)
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  #71   ^
Old Mon, Nov-04-19, 10:57
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Calianna Calianna is offline
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I think the "gluten free" label on products that have always been gluten free is at least in part because people who have no idea about nutrition, and have never read ingredients labels don't have a clue what's actually ok on their gluten free diet, and what isn't, and the ripe olive producer doesn't want to lose sales to their gluten free customers' uncertainty about whether their olives are gluten free or not.

Same as putting keto friendly, low carb, cholesterol free, or low fat on a product that has always qualified for a particular label.

Another reason some companies put gluten free on the label is that they previously used an ingredient that had a gluten containing component in it (for instance, a minor ingredient that isn't an obvious source of gluten, but still could provide a tiny bit of gluten - for instance, if a preservative, coloring, or flavoring was derived from something that contains gluten), or that what should be a naturally gluten free food had previously been processed on equipment that also processed gluten containing foods, but they've now replaced the old equipment with new equipment that's never been used for any gluten containing ingredients, so they can now declare the product to be gluten free.


Whether it's labeled gluten free, keto, LC, fat free, cholesterol free, or sodium free, etc, it may all about market share, but not necessarily for the obvious reason of wanting to get in on the latest diet craze. They may have very well made some kind of change in the ingredients or processing that allows them to declare it acceptable for that diet.
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  #72   ^
Old Mon, Nov-04-19, 10:57
Verbena Verbena is offline
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"Gluten free" on a tin of olives, or anywhere else where it is ridiculous, is just marketing hype. I remember saying the same thing about "cholesterol free" on things like jars of jam.
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  #73   ^
Old Mon, Nov-04-19, 11:09
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Calianna Calianna is offline
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Oh speaking of gluten free, I had a customer at the store who came in every day and bought as many bags of Bob's Red Mill vital wheat gluten as we had in stock that day - he'd completely clear out the shelf every day, and some days he'd buy a dozen or more 22 oz packages of it. He and his wife ran some kind of restaurant in the area (and he often wore a shirt declaring that he was vegan), but I always wondered what on earth they did with so much gluten flour every single day. I should have asked, but didn't (and I retired from that job a couple months ago, so will no longer have occasion to ask), since my assumption was that they made a lot of bread every day - probably specialty whole grain breads that required a lot of gluten to make the loaves acceptably light and fluffy for most customers tastes.


So obviously there are still people using and eating lots of gluten.
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  #74   ^
Old Mon, Nov-04-19, 11:42
Calianna's Avatar
Calianna Calianna is offline
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Plan: Atkins-ish (hypoglycemia)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Verbena
"Gluten free" on a tin of olives, or anywhere else where it is ridiculous, is just marketing hype. I remember saying the same thing about "cholesterol free" on things like jars of jam.



It is marketing hype... but then you have to realize that the general public isn't necessarily educated on nutritional information. In fact, most people are downright ignorant about what's in their food.


I had customers who didn't know the difference between fat and carbs, protein and salt, that cholesterol is a component of fat, that sugar is a carb, or that the calories are based on a single serving, which is usually not the entire package.



Based on what I saw every day at work, most people don't even care what's in the food they eat until a doctor puts them on a special diet, or they decide to do a diet that excludes or limits a certain component or nutrient, such as gluten - then and only then would they show some interest in what they ate, but rather than researching before shopping so they'd know which foods contained/didn't contain/were high/low in certain things, or reading the nutrition stats or ingredients on the back, they would just look for the declaration on the label. (Chances are they'd also need their glasses to read the stuff on the back, but they might be able to read the big declaration on the front without their glasses)



I dealt with a lot of customers who would proudly declare what diet they were doing (or what the doctor told them they needed to give up), but their entire order was composed of foods that were the exact opposite of what that diet required.



~No, your heavy cream is not fat free.
~Sorry, your bag of oreos are not keto friendly.
~Um, no - "I can't believe it's not butter" is not actually real butter.
~No, real butter is not fat free, and yes, real butter has cholesterol.

~Your store baked bread, donuts, muffins, cake and cookies are made from wheat flour, so none of them are gluten free.
~This local brand of potato chips is cooked in lard, so no, it's not cholesterol free.
~Sorry, organic only means the product is produced without chemically produced fertilizers, chemically produced herbicides, and chemically produced insecticides. It doesn't necessarily mean it's fat free, cholesterol free, vegan, sodium free, and it can still have artificial flavors or colors if they're organically produced.


I could go on and on...
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  #75   ^
Old Mon, Nov-04-19, 13:17
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Bob, labeling. What is on the label is not held to any legal accountability, in fact I NEVER go by the front kabel. MUST read the ingredient label for the truth, they cant lie there.
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