Active Low-Carber Forums
Atkins diet and low carb discussion provided free for information only, not as medical advice.
Home Plans Tips Recipes Tools Stories Studies Products
Active Low-Carber Forums
A sugar-free zone


Welcome to the Active Low-Carber Forums.
Support for Atkins diet, Protein Power, Neanderthin (Paleo Diet), CAD/CALP, Dr. Bernstein Diabetes Solution and any other healthy low-carb diet or plan, all are welcome in our lowcarb community. Forget starvation and fad diets -- join the healthy eating crowd! You may register by clicking here, it's free!

Go Back   Active Low-Carber Forums > Main Low-Carb Diets Forums & Support > Low Carb Health & Technical Forums > Nutrition & Supplements
User Name
Password
FAQ Members Calendar Mark Forums Read Search Gallery My P.L.A.N. Survey


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   ^
Old Wed, Jun-24-20, 11:30
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 12,457
 
Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/194/160 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 32%
Location: Texas
Default Choline – The Underconsumed and Underappreciated Essential Nutrient

Choline – The Underconsumed and Underappreciated Essential Nutrient

Quote:
Featured article in the Winter 2019 Issue of Nutrition Close-Up; written by Taylor C. Wallace, PhD, CFS, FACN

“Recognition of the growing evidence relating inadequate intakes to health consequences coupled with evidence of suboptimal intakes in high-risk populations, warrants a need for improved public health recommendations for choline” was the consensus of more than 40 experts attending the 2018 Choline Science Summit, whose findings were summarized recently in a feature article in the journal Nutrition Today.1

Choline’s role in human health begins prenatally and extends into adulthood and old age.2 Its functions are complex and include, but are not limited to, neurotransmitter synthesis, cell membrane signaling, lipid transport and methyl group metabolism. Choline has been recognized as an essential nutrient in the U.S. and Canada since 1998; it has long been established that deficiency results in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

Choline’s function and recognition among health professionals regarding cogniti on across the lifespan has only recently gained momentum. Humans can produce small amounts of choline but must consume the nutrient through the diet to prevent deficiency.2
The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recently affirmed choline as a key nutrient to support neurodevelopment during the first 1000 days postconception.3 Adequate maternal choline intake has been shown to help the baby’s brain and spinal cord develop properly.1 Additional research has shown that choline eases the baby’s response to stress and enhances nutrient transfer across the placenta to the developing fetus.4,5 Importantly, lactation increases the maternal choline requirement.2

Higher maternal intake of choline results in lasting beneficial cognitive effects that become more pronounced with aging in both animal and human models. Results of a recent randomized controlled trial reveal benefits of higher maternal choline intake on child attention, memory and problem solving that may last into the school-age years.1,6 Choline intake throughout adulthood may also help reduce the risk of age-related cognitive decline,7 however these findings are predominately based on observational studies or animal-models and more research is needed.

Analysis from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey indicates that the majority of the U.S. population is not consuming sufficient choline to meet recommended intakes. The daily value for choline is 550 mg per day, however estimated mean daily intake is approximately 319 mg per day.8 It is difficult to get enough choline without consuming eggs or taking a dietary supplement and therefore, it’s not surprising that 90% of Americans and 92% of pregnant women do not achieve current recommended intakes for choline.8,9

The bottom line – health professionals need to be aware of food sources of choline and while data indicate a need for Americans to increase plant-foods in the diet, this should not mean eliminating nutrient dense animal-derived foods such as eggs that contain higher levels of choline. Health professionals should strongly consider the recommendations from the American Medical Association (AMA) and AAP, as well as the recent scientific literature summarized in this recently published report. Dietary guidance that helps all individuals meet current choline recommendations is critical for the health and wellbeing of all individuals.


https://www.eggnutritioncenter.org/...ntial-nutrient/
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2   ^
Old Wed, Jun-24-20, 12:20
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 15,366
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/232/200 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 42%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

Ive come to the conclusion that prenatal mothets are poorly fed. Yes, lots of calories, but empty calories. The result is less than optimal environment for the baby.

Chololine...from eggs ...... bet its all in the yolk that so many low fat followers toss.
Reply With Quote
  #3   ^
Old Wed, Jun-24-20, 14:54
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 12,457
 
Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/194/160 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 32%
Location: Texas
Default

This is very interesting

Quote:
Research on the benefits of choline is continuing, but according to studies so far, adequate choline intake is associated with preventing or resolving a number of diseases and conditions, such as:

Alzheimer's disease,
Dementia,
Depression,
Memory loss,
Anxiety,
Cerebellar ataxia
Tourette's disease,
Schizophrenia,
Cardiovascular disease,
Liver diseases, such as hepatitis and cirrhosis,
Huntington's chorea,
Certain types of seizures,
High cholesterol,
Certain types of cancer,
Asthma and allergies.


Quote:
How does Choline help brain function?

Choline is a "building block" for the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, which promotes intelligence and memory in the brain. Research on pregnant rats indicates that there is a correlation between choline intake and the ability to perform mental tasks of the offspring. Choline has been found to promote optimal memory functioning and to promote the ability to learn, as well as a preventative agent for protecting against dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

In other medical studies, choline has emerged as a helpful nutrient in lowering the levels of an amino acid in the blood called homocysteine. This is important because elevated levels of homocysteine are linked to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. Additional research has shown that choline has also been associated with properties that protect the liver from certain diseases and to help repair liver damage which has already occurred.


https://www.brainpower.org/research/choline.html
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 20:09.


Copyright © 2000-2021 Active Low-Carber Forums @ forum.lowcarber.org
Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.