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-   -   Eating a dozen eggs a week doesn't hurt your cholesterol: Study (http://forum.lowcarber.org/showthread.php?t=485836)

Calianna Fri, Mar-29-24 13:48

Eating a dozen eggs a week doesn't hurt your cholesterol: Study
 
I can't believe this actually showed up in mainstream media: Good Morning America

Quote:
Eating a dozen eggs a week doesn't hurt your cholesterol: Study

Eating more than a dozen fortified eggs each week did not negatively affect cholesterol levels compared to an egg-free diet among U.S. adults aged 50 or older, according to a new study to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Sessions in Atlanta.

The study adds evidence that eggs -- once vilified as an unwanted cause of high cholesterol -- could be part of a healthy and balanced diet, even for people with a higher risk of heart disease.

In the study, a total of 140 adults older than age 50, who also had heart disease or at least two risk factors for developing heart disease, followed either an egg-free diet (less than two eggs per week) or a diet of eating more than 12 fortified eggs each week. Fortified eggs contain additional amounts of vitamins (such as vitamin D) or omega-3 fatty acids, typically through nutrient-enriched hen feeds. The study participants' cholesterol levels were monitored at the beginning of the study, then again at four months.

Results did not show any meaningful change in levels of HDL ("good" cholesterol) or LDL ("bad" cholesterol) between these two groups, suggesting that eating at least 12 fortified eggs each week did not have any negative effects on cholesterol levels.


Fortified eggs were chosen as they may contain enriched levels of "vitamins D, B and E, omega- fatty acids, iodine along with lower saturated fat," wrote Dr. Nina Nouhravesh, research fellow at the Duke Clinical Research Institute in Durham, North Carolina, and the study's lead author.
Nouhravesh noted that in the study, among patients with "heart disease or at risk of developing heart disease, the consumption of 12 fortified eggs per week did not negatively impact their cholesterol over 4 months, when compared to patients who were on a non-egg supplemented diet."

"The urban myth out there is that eggs are bad for your heart. It's not a total myth, but we've known that guidelines for healthy eating took out previous advice to limit dietary cholesterol, because it really didn't make a big difference in overall cholesterol. The cholesterol is in the egg yolk," said Dr. James O'Keefe, Professor of Medicine at the University of Missouri-Kansas City and cardiologist at Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute.

"As we get older, we need higher amounts of protein to maintain muscle mass. Muscle mass and physical strength are two predictors for healthy aging. It's important to maintain and build muscle mass at middle age and beyond. Eggs are an inexpensive, widely available source of protein," said O'Keefe.


For most people, eggs are nutritious and an excellent source of protein. But medical experts say each person should speak to their health care providers about whether a diet heavy in eggs is appropriate given their individual cholesterol levels and dietary needs.


https://www.goodmorningamerica.com/...study-108553012

(Fortified eggs contain less saturated fat and additional vitamins and minerals, such as iodine, vitamin D, selenium, vitamin B2, vitamin B5, vitamin B12, and omega-3 fatty acids. This is accomplished by feeding hens a special diet)

Calianna Fri, Mar-29-24 13:55

I don't think any of us who have been on ALC for years are the least bit surprised by the momentous discovery that eggs do not raise cholesterol levels.

The use of Fortified Eggs though - I think the story was mostly an ad for Eggland's eggs, since those are the ones that come up when you google Fortified Eggs.

I'm still trying to find comparative cholesterol content for Fortified/Eggland's eggs vs regular eggs.

ETA: LOL, just found it -

Regular eggs have 186 mg cholesterol...

Eggland's claims to only have 175 mg cholesterol.

Yep, that 11 mg is a BIG difference!

Bob-a-rama Fri, Mar-29-24 17:00

Eggs do irritate arthritis, though. I'v read it's the arachidonic acid, and minimizing egg yolks makes a big difference for me.

Cutting out fowl does the same.

I have read that the culprit is what we feed the birds, corn, and soy. They are supposed to eat seeds and insects, and the corn and soy makes their meat and eggs have too much omega 6 fats and not enough omega 3.

I'm not a scientist, so I can't confirm that, but omitting chicken and egg yolks from my already low-carb diet made my arthritis all but disappear.

Calianna Fri, Mar-29-24 20:20

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob-a-rama
Eggs do irritate arthritis, though. I'v read it's the arachidonic acid, and minimizing egg yolks makes a big difference for me.

Cutting out fowl does the same.

I have read that the culprit is what we feed the birds, corn, and soy. They are supposed to eat seeds and insects, and the corn and soy makes their meat and eggs have too much omega 6 fats and not enough omega 3.

I'm not a scientist, so I can't confirm that, but omitting chicken and egg yolks from my already low-carb diet made my arthritis all but disappear.



I'm not trying to goad you into trying that (although my "curiosity gene" has perked up and would love to know the outcome), but if you don't mind risking an arthritic flare up, you could test that theory by having an egg or two, or a single meal using pastured/free range fowl that are not provided any kind of supplemental grain, and see what happens.

You'd probably need to find someone local who raises chickens so that you can be assured their chickens are never fed any supplemental corn or soy, because I'm pretty sure even the chickens and eggs in the stores labeled organic/pasture raised/free range chickens are being given at least some supplemental grains, at least during the winter.

WereBear Sat, Mar-30-24 03:30

While I eat a lot of eggs, there's different forms of arthritis reactions. Gout is rarely diagnosed in women, for instance, but I read a paper saying while it appears in feet in men, it appears in hands with women! That might be the problem with my thumbs, which has gone away.

In my case, it's PLANTS that create problems. The oxalates, lectins, and other anti-nutrients seem to be what I am sensitive to. Looking back, it was low-carb, but otherwise problematic, plants which trigger my autoimmune flares.

Which makes me think it's an allergic reaction. Not some "mysteriously confused" immune system "attacking itself."

For me, the cause of the confusion is not mysterious at all. I am having an understandable full-body reaction to being poisoned.

Reminds me of how people didn't die from peanut allergy in such large numbers until they started long term storage which encouraged fungal growth. That is what causes more people to be labeled with a peanut allergy when it might be the fungal content.

So now it's almond butter, not prone to the fungus, but loaded with oxalate and absolute water hogs in areas where drought is now a concern.

Calianna Sat, Mar-30-24 12:01

Quote:
Reminds me of how people didn't die from peanut allergy in such large numbers until they started long term storage which encouraged fungal growth. That is what causes more people to be labeled with a peanut allergy when it might be the fungal content.


I'd read a while back that they were recommending avoiding giving children anything at all with peanuts in it until they were... 4 years old (? or something like that - can't remember the exact age - but it was a few years of age). There had been peanut allergies before that of course, but the rate of severe peanut allergies exploded in children who were not given any peanut containing foods until a later age.

So then they changed the recommendations again and suggested introducing children to peanut products at a much younger age (1 year maybe? Again, I can't recall the age), and those kids were having no problems with peanuts.

Whether it's a fungal problem or the peanuts themselves, then surely that would affect the children given peanuts at a younger age... unless it's a matter of familiarity with a potential allergen at a younger age that helps build up tolerance to an allergen.

(I'd need to google around a bit to see what the latest is on it - my kids are in their 30's and 40's and it does not currently look like either will be having children, so the matter was not of vital importance to me at the time, therefore I didn't delve further into it back when I first saw that the recommendations had changed, then changed again)

Bob-a-rama Sat, Mar-30-24 13:05

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calianna
I'm not trying to goad you into trying that (although my "curiosity gene" has perked up and would love to know the outcome), but if you don't mind risking an arthritic flare up, you could test that theory by having an egg or two, or a single meal using pastured/free range fowl that are not provided any kind of supplemental grain, and see what happens.

You'd probably need to find someone local who raises chickens so that you can be assured their chickens are never fed any supplemental corn or soy, because I'm pretty sure even the chickens and eggs in the stores labeled organic/pasture raised/free range chickens are being given at least some supplemental grains, at least during the winter.


I can't find any local non-corn fed eggs. I tried that.

My old family doctor, who retired some years ago was the kind who used drugs as the next to last resort, and surgery as the very last resort. He gave me the arthritis/bursitis diet.

Before the diet, I couldn't walk two blocks without sitting. Now I can walk miles with no problem.

Before the diet I needed a 'blue ice' pack behind my hip to drive, now I can drive 8 hours with no pain.

Before the diet, I would avoid playing G# notes on the sax, because that spring is stiff, and it hurt, now I can play all the G#s I want.

If interested, here is the diet:

For both arthritis and bursitis, treatment is similar:

Try the dietary approach first, and if that doesn't work, take stronger action.

Foods that may contribute to chronic inflammation are foods with a high glycemic index (foods that convert to sugar quickly), such as fruit juices, sugars, simple starches, or rice cakes, foods heavy in polyunsaturated or saturated fats, and foods high in arachidonic acid. Some specific foods to avoid are:

* Fatty cuts of red meat (high in saturated fats) lean is good
* Organ meats: liver, kidney, and so forth (very high in arachidonic acid)
* Egg yolks (very high in arachidonic acid)
* Poultry - chicken, duck, turkey (very high in arachidonic acid)
* Pasta (high glycemic index)
* Juices (high glycemic index)
* Rice, especially rice cakes (high glycemic index)
* White bread (substitute whole grain breads such as rye)
* Nightshade Plants bother many people (tomatoes, potatoes, eggplants, peppers, paprika)

Glycemic index charts can be found on the Internet.

Better choices are foods with a low glycemic index and foods that are heavy in monounsaturated fats. Some specific good foods are:

* Salmon and other fish
* Oatmeal
* Low glycemic fresh fruits and vegetables
* Olives and olive oil
* Peanuts and other nuts
* Whey proteins
* Lean beef is good, 100% grass fed is better


I decided it's better to give up some foods than to live in pain.

Also, inflammation ages you quicker, I'm having a good life, and don't want to end until I'm past 100.

Calianna Sat, Mar-30-24 16:01

Quote:
I can't find any local non-corn fed eggs. I tried that.


I understand why even pastured/free range flocks need to be supplemented with grain during the winter - the bug population is pretty minimal in cold weather, so the chickens need some kind of supplementation.

Wonder if there might be a possibility during the summer of some younger chickens who never needed to be supplemented with grain? Some breeds can start laying eggs at 16-18 weeks of age, although at that age they'd be smaller chickens and produce smaller eggs.

Any chance you could raise a few of your own from chicks so that you can control their diets? (I live in an area that prohibits backyard chickens, but it might be worth looking into)

WereBear Sun, Mar-31-24 06:28

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob-a-rama
I decided it's better to give up some foods than to live in pain.

Also, inflammation ages you quicker, I'm having a good life, and don't want to end until I'm past 100.


I am likewise aiming high :lol:

Also, I feel owed another adulthood, only this time with some skills and sense, compared to 18 when I went out on my own. :wave:

WereBear Sun, Mar-31-24 06:33

A twist on convenience foods came to me.

I think Bob's bargain illustrates how avoiding certain foods can be the most convenient path to health. I went to a birthday party and I had pork and my homemade coleslaw with 1 tablespoon of honey in the whole thing and there were comments on how flavorful my dressing was.

Yes. It was loaded with food, not chemicals. To me, that's proof that people can make the switch if they could be convinced they aren't losing favorite foods.

They can find new ones.

Ms Arielle Sun, Mar-31-24 15:33

Choletsterol and eggs.

Long long ago, at university, three professors taught the Foods class. Very enlightening!!

Eggs are not a problem regarding cholesterol.And prof explained why: tests for cholesterol levels not accurate.

While that argument has not held up, I never stopped eating eggs. And my kids eat eggs.

And my hens provide far too many eggs! This is the season to freeze the extras.

WereBear Mon, Apr-01-24 04:51

I have been eating eggs regularly since 2003. So versatile in cooking, too. I make pork rind pancakes, and the number of eggs can very the texture for me.

Dodger Mon, Apr-01-24 05:07

I eat three eggs every day as part of my breakfast. I've been doing so for years and I haven't noticed any health problems from doing so. I did have health problems when I ate high-fiber breakfast cereals with skim milk.

WereBear Mon, Apr-01-24 11:12

Eggs are a good source of selenium.

Bob-a-rama Mon, Apr-01-24 18:19

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calianna
<...snip...>
Any chance you could raise a few of your own from chicks so that you can control their diets? (I live in an area that prohibits backyard chickens, but it might be worth looking into)


Not a chance. They are allowed here. But as a musician, I get a lot of out-of-town work, sometimes gig on cruise ships for extended periods of times, so to have any pets or livestock that will depend on me is out of the question.

It would be cruel to the animals, and I can't do that.

I do eat one or two eggs per week. At that rate, it doesn't bother me. When I was eating them every day, it was killing me. I buy those pasture raised eggs at the grocery store.

I quit eating chicken, too. Once or twice a year, at the most, only if invited to join friends. Breaded, fried, chicken breasts with honey were a treat for me in the past, and I enjoyed it then, but not now. I enjoyed skin diving and other activities, too, but no longer do them either. Life is indeed a journey.

Instead of dwelling on the foods I once enjoyed, and no longer eat, I focus on the foods that I can eat, and are nourishing for me.

So, my diet is limited, but my health is outstanding, and I plan to live to be a healthy 120 — so far — so good. :D

When I see my doc for an annual physical, she tells me “See you next year”. All my blood work is in the normal zone, I hardly ever even catch a cold (last one was about 15 years ago) and I can't remember the last time I had the flu. It was before keto, and I don't get flu shots. I did get COVID shots though - better safe than sorry in that department.

You can focus on what you like to eat, you can focus on what agrees with you, and you can focus on both what you like that agrees with you. Everyone has to make that choice. I choose the third.

It sometimes takes some work to find out what agrees/disagrees with you. Research plus elimination diets worked for me. No two of us are alike in that respect.

IMO without your health, you have nothing. So instead of living to eat, I eat to live.

I hope all of us on this board finds their individual way to health.


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