Active Low-Carber Forums
Atkins diet and low carb discussion provided free for information only, not as medical advice.
Home Plans Tips Recipes Tools Stories Studies Products
Active Low-Carber Forums
A sugar-free zone


Welcome to the Active Low-Carber Forums.
Support for Atkins diet, Protein Power, Neanderthin (Paleo Diet), CAD/CALP, Dr. Bernstein Diabetes Solution and any other healthy low-carb diet or plan, all are welcome in our lowcarb community. Forget starvation and fad diets -- join the healthy eating crowd! You may register by clicking here, it's free!

Go Back   Active Low-Carber Forums > Main Low-Carb Diets Forums & Support > Low-Carb Support Focus Groups > Pre-Maintenance & Maintenance
User Name
Password
Register FAQ Members Calendar Mark Forums Read Search Gallery My P.L.A.N. Survey


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   ^
Old Mon, May-05-14, 08:26
Judynyc's Avatar
Judynyc Judynyc is offline
Attitude is a Choice
Posts: 29,974
 
Plan: SBD->atkins twist->paleo
Stats: 274/000/160 Female 5'6"
BF:stl/too/mch
Progress: 240%
Location: NYC
Default Media for weight loss maintenance

http://health.yahoo.net/experts/dia...ing-weight-loss

Tips for Maintaining Weight Loss

Quote:
Yay! You've improved your eating habits, stayed away from chips and other fried foods, ate more vegetables, and walked 30 minutes almost every day. You lost weight and are at your goal! Your blood glucose levels and hemoglobin A1c have improved—now what?

What can you do to keep those pounds from coming back?

The National Weight Control Registry (NWCR) was started in 1994 to document successful examples of weight loss and to show a skeptical public that it is indeed possible to lose weight and keep it off. The NWCR also offers recommendations based on the real-life experiences and characteristics of the individuals who have succeeded in losing at least 30 pounds and have kept it off for at least one year.

According to the NWCR, here are some of the behaviors that help people maintain weight loss:
•Continue a low-calorie meal plan, about 1,300 calories a day for women and 1,700 calories a day for men.
•Continue limiting foods that are high in fat.
•Eat breakfast every day.
•Continue regular exercise: 90 percent of the successful participants exercise about one hour a day.
•Aim to eat roughly the same foods on weekends that you are eating on weekdays.
•Continue to weigh yourself frequently—75 percent of participants weigh themselves at least once a week.
•Limit watching television to 10 hours or less each week.

How they lost the weight isn't that important

Interestingly, the method of weight loss did not matter. People lost weight with a variety of approaches—an organized program, weight-loss surgery, liquid nutritional supplements, their own plan, and so forth.

How they kept it off is what matters

All participants, however, reported similar strategies to maintain their weight losses. People who regained weight were those who had a harder time maintaining the behavior changes that they had put into practice while losing weight. Compared to the successful participants, these folks often experienced significant levels of depression and their susceptibility to overeating seemed to be influenced more by their inner feelings and thoughts.

For more information, or to join the NWCR, visit the website.

And, again, congratulations on losing that weight and keeping it off!
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2   ^
Old Mon, May-05-14, 08:36
Judynyc's Avatar
Judynyc Judynyc is offline
Attitude is a Choice
Posts: 29,974
 
Plan: SBD->atkins twist->paleo
Stats: 274/000/160 Female 5'6"
BF:stl/too/mch
Progress: 240%
Location: NYC
Default Tactics Are Different for Weight Loss, Maintenance

Tactics Are Different for Weight Loss, Maintenance

http://www.webmd.com/diet/news/2011...oss-maintenance
Study Suggests Separate Skill Sets Are Needed to Lose Weight and Then Keep It Off
.
By Denise Mann
WebMD Health News

Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD


Quote:
July 5, 2011 -- The same tactics that help you lose weight won't necessarily help you keep it off.

The new study, which appears in August issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, suggests that successful losers need to switch gears to stay the course and maintain their weight loss.

Researchers surveyed 1,165 adults about 36 specific practices to determine which of these behaviors was associated with weight loss and/or weight loss maintenance. Weight loss referred to losing 10% of body weight or more in past year, while maintenance was defined as losing 10% or more of body weight and keeping it off for one year or more.

Overall, different skill sets and behaviors are involved with weight loss and weight maintenance. For example, participating in a weight loss program, limiting the sugar in your diet, eating healthy snacks, and not skipping meals may help you lose weight initially, but these practices don't have all that much to do with maintaining the loss.

Eating lots of low-fat sources of protein, following a consistent exercise routine, and rewarding yourself for sticking with your plan and reminding yourself why you want to keep your weight off were linked to maintaining weight loss, but not the earlier weight loss, the study showed.

Weight Loss vs. Weight Maintenance

Losing weight is the (relatively) easy part, saysJames O. Hill, PhD, a professor of pediatrics and medicine and director of the Center for Human Nutrition at the University of Colorado at Denver. Hill and colleagues are keeping track of those who can maintain their weight loss via the National Weight Control Registry.

The new study "reinforces what we have been saying about differences between losing weight and keeping it off," he tells WebMD.

It is a three-phase process: weight loss, transition to maintenance, and maintaining the weight loss, Hill says.

"Getting the weight off is only one task, which is followed by switching your mind-set to a more permanent way of living so you keep it off," he says.



The second part of the battle can be an uphill one, and it's one of the reasons that so many high-profile celebrities lose weight only to regain it. "People still want to concentrate on losing weight, but the harder part is keeping it off," he says.

Hill says that increasing physical activity is essential to maintaining any weight loss.

"Unless you are able to ramp up your physical activity in a pretty major way, you won't keep the weight off," he says. Another key ingredient is a strong social support system. "You need to create the right kind of social network to reinforce the routine of both diet and exercise."

Timothy Harlan, MD, an assistant professor of medicine at Tulane University School of Medicine, a former restaurateur known as "Dr. Gourmet," and author of Just Tell Me What to Eat!, says that the key to maintaining weight loss involves changing our mind-set.

"If you want to be healthy, lose weight, and keep it off, you need to change the way you eat," he says.

The word diet implies a beginning and an end and sets you up for failure, Harlan says,

"Eating healthy and being healthy is a lifelong prescription," he says. "If you want to lose weight and you want to keep it off, you have to completely change your relationship with food forever."

"Planning is the single most important thing people can do to lose weight and maintain that loss," Harlan says. This means planning what you are going to eat and when you are going to eat it -- same as you plan your children's schedule and your workday. This may involve packing your own lunch and not skipping breakfast.


"Realizing this difference, shortly after the six-month time period of average maximal weight loss has passed, is really important," says study researcher Christopher Sciamanna, MD, a professor of medicine and public health sciences at the Penn State College of Medicine, in an email. "It seems somewhat similar to love and marriage. What gets you to the altar is likely to be quite different than what keeps you married in the long-term. [And] not recognizing this transition and adapting with different practices will also get you in trouble."

"It's a slightly different process," he says. "To be successful one must adapt to this different process or risk being less successful," he says. "Yes, it still comes down to decreasing caloric intake and/or increasing caloric expenditure, but the practices that help you achieve those, based on our study, appear to be different."
Reply With Quote
  #3   ^
Old Mon, May-05-14, 08:42
Judynyc's Avatar
Judynyc Judynyc is offline
Attitude is a Choice
Posts: 29,974
 
Plan: SBD->atkins twist->paleo
Stats: 274/000/160 Female 5'6"
BF:stl/too/mch
Progress: 240%
Location: NYC
Default

I'm starting to see more and more articles written on 'long term weight loss maintenance'. That's why I started a thread dedicated to just this subject. Feel free to add articles to this if/when you see them.
Reply With Quote
  #4   ^
Old Mon, May-05-14, 09:18
Judynyc's Avatar
Judynyc Judynyc is offline
Attitude is a Choice
Posts: 29,974
 
Plan: SBD->atkins twist->paleo
Stats: 274/000/160 Female 5'6"
BF:stl/too/mch
Progress: 240%
Location: NYC
Default Long-term weight loss maintenance

http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/82/1/222S.full

Long-term weight loss maintenance


Quote:
Abstract

There is a general perception that almost no one succeeds in long-term maintenance of weight loss. However, research has shown that ≈20% of overweight individuals are successful at long-term weight loss when defined as losing at least 10% of initial body weight and maintaining the loss for at least 1 y. The National Weight Control Registry provides information about the strategies used by successful weight loss maintainers to achieve and maintain long-term weight loss. National Weight Control Registry members have lost an average of 33 kg and maintained the loss for more than 5 y. To maintain their weight loss, members report engaging in high levels of physical activity (≈1 h/d), eating a low-calorie, low-fat diet, eating breakfast regularly, self-monitoring weight, and maintaining a consistent eating pattern across weekdays and weekends. Moreover, weight loss maintenance may get easier over time; after individuals have successfully maintained their weight loss for 2–5 y, the chance of longer-term success greatly increases. Continued adherence to diet and exercise strategies, low levels of depression and disinhibition, and medical triggers for weight loss are also associated with long-term success. National Weight Control Registry members provide evidence that long-term weight loss maintenance is possible and help identify the specific approaches associated with long-term success.

This is very lengthy and there is much more at the link.
Reply With Quote
  #5   ^
Old Mon, May-05-14, 09:28
Whofan's Avatar
Whofan Whofan is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 2,550
 
Plan: Low Carb Primal
Stats: 170/135/135 Female 5ft.6in.
BF:
Progress: 100%
Location: New York Metro area
Default

I'm loving this thread. Thanks.
Reply With Quote
  #6   ^
Old Mon, May-05-14, 13:43
Judynyc's Avatar
Judynyc Judynyc is offline
Attitude is a Choice
Posts: 29,974
 
Plan: SBD->atkins twist->paleo
Stats: 274/000/160 Female 5'6"
BF:stl/too/mch
Progress: 240%
Location: NYC
Default Maintenance Resources

I forgot that Demi posted this huge thread that's pinned up top:
http://forum.lowcarber.org/showthread.php?t=405471

Maintenance Resources
Reply With Quote
  #7   ^
Old Wed, May-07-14, 16:03
Judynyc's Avatar
Judynyc Judynyc is offline
Attitude is a Choice
Posts: 29,974
 
Plan: SBD->atkins twist->paleo
Stats: 274/000/160 Female 5'6"
BF:stl/too/mch
Progress: 240%
Location: NYC
Default Weight loss lowers resting metabolic rate

Weight loss lowers resting metabolic rate


http://www.robertbarrington.net/wei...metabolic-rate/

This nutritionist wrote a blog post about how losing weight reduces metabolism. I'd copy and paste it here but his page won't allow it.

I'm interested in this as I'm now way into my maintenance and have gained about 8-10 lbs in the past 24 months. I'm trying to gain a better understanding.

I think that when I had (para)thyroid surgery 2 yrs ago, that it effected my thyroid's performance.
Reply With Quote
  #8   ^
Old Sun, May-11-14, 17:49
Enomarb Enomarb is offline
MAINTAINING ON CALP
Posts: 4,806
 
Plan: CALP/CAHHP
Stats: 180/130/150 Female 65 in
BF:
Progress: 167%
Location: usa
Default

Thanks, Judy!
Reply With Quote
  #9   ^
Old Sun, May-11-14, 19:31
lowcarbedd's Avatar
lowcarbedd lowcarbedd is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 893
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 169.2/137/149 Female 69inches
BF:
Progress: 159%
Default

Love this thread
Reply With Quote
  #10   ^
Old Sun, May-11-14, 20:44
LaughLola's Avatar
LaughLola LaughLola is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 147
 
Plan: Low carb
Stats: 165/159/125 Female 65
BF:
Progress: 15%
Location: NC
Default

Thanks for sharing the information. After reading the thread, I looked thru my diary and see how my weight fluctuates every few years for several decades now.

In January 2012 I weighed 124Ibs, and January 2013 I weighed 141Ibs and now May 2014 I weigh 162Ibs.

Looking back, I see every year and a 1/2 or so I gain and lose about the same amount of weight. I realize I'm able to lose the weight by controlling my eating habits and once I reach goal I slide back into eating desserts and mindless snacking.

That sure explains why I have size 4 thru size 14 pants in my wardrobe; I refuse to give away the pants because for years I have a pattern of fitting in all the sizes as I yo yo back and forth.

Just. I think it's time to break this pattern for 2014.
Reply With Quote
  #11   ^
Old Sat, May-31-14, 14:30
Judynyc's Avatar
Judynyc Judynyc is offline
Attitude is a Choice
Posts: 29,974
 
Plan: SBD->atkins twist->paleo
Stats: 274/000/160 Female 5'6"
BF:stl/too/mch
Progress: 240%
Location: NYC
Default

Quote:
Profiles of Success
One well known model for weight loss maintenance is the National Weight Control Registry, a self selected group of 4,000 plus adults who have lost at least 30 pounds and kept it off one year or longer. According to their self reports, these persons succeed by:
•continuing to follow a low-calorie, low-fat diet,
•exercising regularly at a high level,
•weighing themselves frequently and
•eating breakfast every day.
The most commonly reported physical activity is walking at a moderately intense pace for at least an hour each day. Women use up an average of 2,500 calories a week; men, about 3,300 in this physical activity.

A Swedish review of studies published in 2005 also produced a profile of the “successful weight maintainer.” Such a person:
•starts early with an ambitious goal and reaches it;
•is physically active with leisure activities such as walking or cycling and minimal TV watching;
•continues to monitor weight-related behavior by counting calories and weighing regularly;
•eats less than before with less snacking and fewer high-fat foods; and
•has a regular eating pattern of healthy meals, including breakfast.
These two profiles are remarkably similar. Both characterize persons who are serious about weight loss and willing to alter their behavior significantly to maintain it. One study of National Weight Registry members found that those who succeeded in keeping weight off for two years or longer had a 50 percent reduced risk of regaining that weight later.

http://www.amerymedicalcenter.org/A...t_it_takes.aspx

The above is an excerpt from a post at the link. While it is still pushing the low fat dogma, it is another look at the fact that it is very possible to keep that weight off.
Reply With Quote
  #12   ^
Old Sat, May-31-14, 14:51
Aradasky's Avatar
Aradasky Aradasky is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 10,116
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 199/000/000 Female 5"3'
BF:
Progress: 100%
Location: Southern California
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Judynyc
Quote:
Profiles of Success
One well known model for weight loss maintenance is the National Weight Control Registry, a self selected group of 4,000 plus adults who have lost at least 30 pounds and kept it off one year or longer. According to their self reports, these persons succeed by:
•continuing to follow a low-calorie, low-fat diet,
•exercising regularly at a high level,
•weighing themselves frequently and
•eating breakfast every day.
The most commonly reported physical activity is walking at a moderately intense pace for at least an hour each day. Women use up an average of 2,500 calories a week; men, about 3,300 in this physical activity.

A Swedish review of studies published in 2005 also produced a profile of the “successful weight maintainer.” Such a person:
•starts early with an ambitious goal and reaches it;
•is physically active with leisure activities such as walking or cycling and minimal TV watching;
•continues to monitor weight-related behavior by counting calories and weighing regularly;
•eats less than before with less snacking and fewer high-fat foods; and
•has a regular eating pattern of healthy meals, including breakfast.
These two profiles are remarkably similar. Both characterize persons who are serious about weight loss and willing to alter their behavior significantly to maintain it. One study of National Weight Registry members found that those who succeeded in keeping weight off for two years or longer had a 50 percent reduced risk of regaining that weight later.
http://www.amerymedicalcenter.org/A...t_it_takes.aspx

The above is an excerpt from a post at the link. While it is still pushing the low fat dogma, it is another look at the fact that it is very possible to keep that weight off.



I do see several differences that mean I will be able to keep my weight off easlier FOR ME, on hf/lc than the LF/HC way.

The first time I lost weght I did lose it with the same calorie count, 1200 or so a day, but this time I am NOT ready to eat the refrigerator an hour after eating. It did nothing for cravings. I exercised like a fiend, lived hours a day at the gym. Kept it mostly off for 5 years, then started my joint replacements. Started gaining because I was still eating LF/HC and did not want to go to lower calories because I knew I would be hungry.

This time, I have had four joint replacements, back surgery and go to the gym once a week. I hike one morning and walk 6 miles another.

I do not get hungry on 1200 calls a day on hf/lc. maintaining at about 1600 calories a day. (The first post said the maintainer women ate 1300 cals a day??? Well, I am NOT that thin, ) I have no cravings. I can easily see myself here, seriously, at least until I am 85 years old when I promised myself a box of chocolates a week............
Reply With Quote
  #13   ^
Old Thu, Jun-05-14, 14:21
Judynyc's Avatar
Judynyc Judynyc is offline
Attitude is a Choice
Posts: 29,974
 
Plan: SBD->atkins twist->paleo
Stats: 274/000/160 Female 5'6"
BF:stl/too/mch
Progress: 240%
Location: NYC
Default Diet and exercise may help maintain weight loss

http://mobile.reuters.com/article/i...pc=932&irpc=932

Diet and exercise may help maintain weight loss

Wed, Jun 04 10:39 AM EDT

By Shereen Lehman

Quote:
NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Programs focused on both diet and exercise may help people who have lost weight keep the pounds from creeping back on, according to a new analysis of past studies.


Orlistat, an obesity drug, may also be effective when taken at higher doses, researchers found.


More at the link.
I just wanted to scream that they'd even suggest Orlitstat to maintain.
Reply With Quote
  #14   ^
Old Thu, Jun-05-14, 16:07
Whofan's Avatar
Whofan Whofan is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 2,550
 
Plan: Low Carb Primal
Stats: 170/135/135 Female 5ft.6in.
BF:
Progress: 100%
Location: New York Metro area
Default

Participants who used Orlistat lost a whopping 4lbs more in a year than the drug-free people.
Can't wait to get my hands on some of that.
Reply With Quote
  #15   ^
Old Thu, Jun-05-14, 16:39
Judynyc's Avatar
Judynyc Judynyc is offline
Attitude is a Choice
Posts: 29,974
 
Plan: SBD->atkins twist->paleo
Stats: 274/000/160 Female 5'6"
BF:stl/too/mch
Progress: 240%
Location: NYC
Default

LOL! Whofan!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:23.


Copyright © 2000-2018 Active Low-Carber Forums @ forum.lowcarber.org
Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.