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  #16   ^
Old Fri, Apr-17-09, 10:35
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 21,957
 
Plan: LCHF/IF
Stats: 217/192/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 44%
Location: UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Judynyc
I don't really know which plans those ladies at Refuse to Regain used to lose their weight. But from reading some of it and seeing how much exercise they say they do, I tend to think that they do low fat, high carb plans. But I don't really know.
According to Lynn Haraldson Bering's blog, she lost her weight with WW, but I haven’t been able to find any mention of how Dr. Barbara Berkeley lost her weight.

However, I am currently reading Dr Berkeley's book Refuse to Regain - 12 Tough Rules to Maintain the Body You've Earned, and her recommendation for eating for weight maintenance is to follow the 'ancient diet' and become, what she calls, a Primarian eater. It is her take on the Paleolithic Hunter-Gatherer diet.

Quote:
The strategy that I advocate derives from a most basic principle: eat what nature intended you to eat and nothing else. I call this diet a "Primarian" eating plan, meaning a diet consisting mostly of the primary or original foods our ancient ancestors consumed.
  • Primarian foods are the original, simple foods of our planet. They include lean animal products, vegetables, fruits, eggs, fish, nuts, seeds and berries.
  • Our genetic makeup is designed to eat the foods that humans ate for millions of years.
  • We are poorly designed to eat modern, altered foods.
  • In addition to minimizing altered foods, POWs should also avoid grains and other Newcomer starches.

POW = Previously Overweight
Altered Foods: Foods of the past 100 years which are changed, added to or otherwise manipulated
Newcomer Foods: Foods introduced with the advent of agriculture, about 10,000 years ago
Primary Foods: Foods that come mostly unchanged from nature and could have been eaten by ancient man


From Refuse to Regain - 12 Tough Rules to Maintain the Body You've Earned by Dr Barbara Berkeley
On top of the primary foods listed, she also includes some 'newer' foods in the form of low-fat/non-fat diary, selected oils (olive, canola, avocado, flaxseed or walnut, NO vegetable oils), non-starchy legumes, occasional alcohol and acceptable treats (i.e., SF jello, LF frozen yoghurt). These foods are allowed because they do not appear to cause weight gain or cravings when consumed reasonably.

Foods to be avoided are grains, corn (incl. popcorn), cereals, products made from flour, rice, potatoes, sugar, honey, juices, sweets, pasta and sweetened drinks. There are other no-no's such as no hot dogs, deli meats, 'heart-healthy' margarines, trans fats.

Obviously, there's quite a lot more about it in the book, but it does give you some idea of where she is coming from.
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  #17   ^
Old Fri, Apr-17-09, 10:50
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Judynyc Judynyc is offline
Attitude is a Choice
Posts: 29,974
 
Plan: SBD->atkins twist->paleo
Stats: 274/000/160 Female 5'6"
BF:stl/too/mch
Progress: 240%
Location: NYC
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Very interesting Demi!!!

Thank you!
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  #18   ^
Old Mon, Apr-20-09, 07:03
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camaromom camaromom is offline
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Posts: 5,280
 
Plan: Atkins/lowering cals
Stats: 187/143.6/135 Female 64
BF:35.2/ 20%/20%
Progress: 83%
Location: Lafayette, IN
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Just wanted to pop in and say that I LOVED the links to this site and I will be visiting it again. Finally something focused not on loss, but maintaining. Real shortage of information for that.
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  #19   ^
Old Fri, Apr-24-09, 11:46
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Demi Demi is offline
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Plan: LCHF/IF
Stats: 217/192/160 Female 5'10"
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From Refuse to Regain:

Quote:
April 22, 2009

"FAT: What No One Is Telling You" Challenges Fat Prejudice

By Lynn Haraldson-Bering


This week I watched the PBS documentary FAT: What No One Is Telling You.” It not only brought back a lot of memories, but it challenged me to better understand the complexity of obesity.

While Barbara works in the field of obesity, my only understanding of the issue is through my own personal experience as a formerly obese person, and through what I read and see in my daily life.

I identified with two of the women profiled, Rosie and Mary. While Rosie had gastric bypass, her reasons for losing weight were very similar to mine, and probably many of yours, too. Aside from the usual desire to walk without pain and to sit on the floor and get up again without it being a major endeavor, Rosie talked about wanting to be “normal,” to be in control, and to not be viewed as fat and therefore weak. She no longer wanted to be the butt of jokes.

Then there was Mary, who is a comedian and was often the butt of her own jokes. Her story, particularly her “ah ha” moment, was something I related to. She was in a park sitting in her car and crying. Her mother was dying of cancer, but at that moment she wasn’t crying over her mother like she usually did. She was crying, she said, because she wanted more from life. Then two guys pulled up and got out of their car. One of the guys said to the other, “Wonder what her problem is?” His friend said that she was probably crying because she was fat and nobody wanted her.

When I heard this, I was offended by their meanness and sad for Mary, but she called it her “epiphany.” She realized she WAS crying because she was fat. She asked herself how she could ever be happy if she couldn’t control what she put in her mouth. People, she said, stop at the physical when assessing each other and she wanted to change what people saw. I understood completely.

It was the other people in the documentary, including one of the producers, who challenged me to assess my “fat prejudice.” Not a comfortable challenge, to be sure, because I’m asking myself, after losing 170 pounds: How do I really see overweight and obese people?

Carla, who was thin as a child but gained weight when she began working in the corporate world, is trying to lose weight. She’d had a particularly stressful day and although she wasn’t hungry, bought ice cream on the way home from work. She said she knew going for a walk would make her feel better, but all she wanted to do was put on her pajamas and eat ice cream. Because that’s not my experience with food, and especially not something I struggled with while losing weight, my first gut reaction was, “Why? Why is she sabotaging all her good efforts?”

Ah…because the problem with obesity is that it is densely complex. My own experience is one of millions, and no two obese people are alike. Not physically in how their fat is distributed, not in their metabolic rates, not in their emotional health, not in their relationship with food and physical activity, and not in the reasons why and how they are obese, be it cultural, genetic, or psychological. There are as many ways to get obese, stay obese, and not be obese as there are people who are obese.

When producer Tom Spain was asked, “What was surprising to you during your journey through this?” he responded:

“The big surprise, and the big dilemma, is the complexity. One researcher told me early on: If you're going to deal with the subject, you have to honor the complexity...I've since learned this is a social phenomenon, an emotional phenomenon, a genetic phenomenon, it's a food supply phenomena. It's such a vast subject that's way beyond the reach of medicine or weight loss programs...it's just huge. That's something that was a surprise and a dilemma because the job of a filmmaker is to take an issue and make it clear and simple. And our message is that this is not clear and this is not simple.”

So how do I, as a person who’s been down the obesity path a few times and is now not obese, honor that complexity?

First impressions is a running theme in the “FAT” documentary. Many of the people interviewed said they wanted to lose weight so others would see them for who they really are. I remember that was one of my reasons for losing weight, too. But our bodies are not our personalities. God knows there are as many malicious skinny people out there as there are good-hearted overweight people. We can’t know someone’s nature simply by assessing their body size. But how do we teach the world to honor an entire person and not judge them based on body size?

When I visited my home state of Minnesota in 2007, I weighed 132 pounds. I went to a convenience store in a small town to buy ice. The woman behind the counter was morbidly obese. She didn’t greet me when I walked in, and when I asked her where the ice was, she merely pointed to the corner of the store. Another woman came out of the back room and joined the woman behind the counter. She, too, was morbidly obese. When I got to the counter, I smiled and said hello. Both of them just looked me up and down with scowls on their faces. I felt like Clint Eastwood when he rode into town in “High Plains Drifter.”

When I got to my car, I wondered if they were rude because I was thin or because I was a stranger or because they were just having a bad day. Thinking back, after watching “FAT,” I wondered if maybe I sent out an anti-fat vibe, the same one I picked up on time and again from non-obese people when I was morbidly obese, whether it was real or imagined. It’s not like I could say to them, “Hey, I used to be just like you!” I had to acknowledge that my first impression was that I saw two very obese women. How in my subconscious did I measure and judge them based solely on that observation?

Watching “FAT,” I realize I’m one of the lucky ones. My mind was prepared to lose weight, and that “switch” we talk about, the one that kicks us into permanent weight-loss mode, stayed in the “on” position during my final journey down the scale. I was also lucky because my body responded to the “eat less, move more” approach. While maintaining my weight is not something I’d describe as easy, I know I won’t gain 170 pounds because I’m in a place – physically and emotionally – that works for me. I don’t know why and I don’t know how, and I suppose if I did I could make a million dollars because if every overweight and obese person thought like I do now and had the same physical makeup as me, everyone would be on their way to thin.

“FAT” doesn’t answer as many questions as it asks, and it left me with lingering doubts about my perceived notions about obese and overweight people. It’s a challenge I am anxious to pursue and perhaps, but not likely, remedy anytime soon. Even after years of being intimately familiar with obesity, I’m only now beginning to learn just how viciously complex a subject it is.

You can watch “FAT” online or check the site for dates in which it will air in your area.

http://refusetoregain.com:80/my_weblog/
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  #20   ^
Old Mon, Apr-27-09, 13:16
Enomarb Enomarb is offline
MAINTAINING ON CALP
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hi-
Demi, thanks for that post. I just watched the whole PBS show- I think it was worth watching, but can be summed up pretty quickly-
[1]Fat people are discriminated against and are unhappy in our society.
[2]Losing weight and keping it off is very hard.
[3]We don't really know why people are fat and we don't know how to help.
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  #21   ^
Old Wed, Apr-29-09, 13:07
Aeryn Aeryn is offline
Paper beats rock?!?
Posts: 828
 
Plan: Atkins! (Maintenance)
Stats: 178/147.6/145 Female 5'8"
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This blog is awesome. Thanks so much for posting about it here, Judy; and thanks to Demi as well for posting entries from it. I didn't know it existed.

Demi, I read with interest the excerpt you posted from Dr. Berkeley's book. I notice you mentioned "low-fat or non-fat dairy" but not regular dairy. Does she advise against eating full-fat cheese, yogurt, and cream?
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  #22   ^
Old Sun, May-03-09, 22:00
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SidC SidC is offline
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Posts: 1,955
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 160/103/115 Female 62 inches
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Progress: 127%
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Quote:
Originally Posted by demi
On top of the primary foods listed, she also includes some 'newer' foods in the form of low-fat/non-fat diary, selected oils (olive, canola, avocado, flaxseed or walnut, NO vegetable oils), non-starchy legumes, occasional alcohol and acceptable treats (i.e., SF jello, LF frozen yoghurt). These foods are allowed because they do not appear to cause weight gain or cravings when consumed reasonably.

Foods to be avoided are grains, corn (incl. popcorn), cereals, products made from flour, rice, potatoes, sugar, honey, juices, sweets, pasta and sweetened drinks. There are other no-no's such as no hot dogs, deli meats, 'heart-healthy' margarines, trans fats.
This is essentially what I've been doing for the last six years with great success. However, full-fat yogurt has never caused me any problems - I have it almost every morning. The last I heard, there is some reason to believe that the carb count on yogurt is overstated on the nutrition label (see yogurt. Sorry - there was another link that talked about why the carb count on yogurt was overstated, but I can't find it at the moment. It was something about how the carbs were counted as a residual, after tallying up calories due to proteins and fats and ascribing everything else to carbs. Anyone else remember that or that reference?)

Good blogs, nice thread - thanks to both Judy and Demi.
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  #23   ^
Old Tue, May-12-09, 11:28
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 21,957
 
Plan: LCHF/IF
Stats: 217/192/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 44%
Location: UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aeryn
Demi, I read with interest the excerpt you posted from Dr. Berkeley's book. I notice you mentioned "low-fat or non-fat dairy" but not regular dairy. Does she advise against eating full-fat cheese, yogurt, and cream?
Her advice is that we shouldn't consume any saturated fats, citing major sources as cheese, butter, fatty meat and baked goods.


Quote:
Originally Posted by SidC
This is essentially what I've been doing for the last six years with great success. However, full-fat yogurt has never caused me any problems - I have it almost every morning. The last I heard, there is some reason to believe that the carb count on yogurt is overstated on the nutrition label (see yogurt. Sorry - there was another link that talked about why the carb count on yogurt was overstated, but I can't find it at the moment. It was something about how the carbs were counted as a residual, after tallying up calories due to proteins and fats and ascribing everything else to carbs. Anyone else remember that or that reference?)
I've not had a problem with full-fat yoghurt either, and like you, have it most mornings in the form of Greek yoghurt. I do find, however, that I need to keep an eye on my cheese intake.

With regard to your reference about carbs in yogurt, it sounds as though you could be referring to 'The Yogurt Exception', and, if so, you might find this thread an interesting read: The truth about carbs in yogurt

Last edited by Demi : Tue, May-12-09 at 11:36.
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  #24   ^
Old Tue, May-12-09, 11:51
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 21,957
 
Plan: LCHF/IF
Stats: 217/192/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 44%
Location: UK
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From Refuse to Regain:

Quote:
May 12, 2009

Question to Readers From Readers: Is Maintenance Possible?

RTR reader Rebecca from Washington D.C. poses a very basic yet incredibly complex question: Is maintenance really possible? Barbara and I will chime in with our thoughts later in the week, but we’re more interested in what you have to say on this subject. As always, leave a comment or send email to refusetoregain~gmail.com.

Here’s Rebecca’s email:

I've been reading your blog for the past several months. It's an excellent website. Kirstie Alley's recent interview on Oprah triggered me to write. One issue that I'd be grateful if you'd address are your views on why it is that maintenance seems to be so difficult for virtually everyone to achieve.

I'm 46 years old, and I have recently lost the same 30 pounds that I've lost four times before in my life since I was 18. After 5 months of changing my eating habits, I'm back down to a comfortable weight range, where I'm wearing size 10 clothes, instead of the plus size clothes I was wearing. (My exercise habits have been good for the past 15 years or so; I've done 30-45 minutes of cardio and strength training regularly for this period.)

Each time previously, I maintained the weight loss (sometimes for a number of years), but somehow found myself back at the weight at which I started. I'm old enough to know that I do not have this figured out, and I am really struggling with thoughts about maintenance, the approach to take, and, most fundamentally, whether maintenance really is possible.

My life feels so much better when I am thinner. Being thinner doesn't fix everything, of course. But I feel so much better in my clothes, and I love not feeling out of control around food. I love not feeling anxious that I may be setting myself up for the unhealthiness of diabetes. More than with any previous weight loss experience, I feel that I've actually changed what I am eating (cut out processed food, refined carbs, sugar) in a way that has minimized "binge-y" feelings. Yet I still feel extremely worried and insecure about maintenance.

In my own life, besides myself, virtually every woman I know has been unable to maintain her loss over the long term. The only woman I know who has done so (a friend of my mother who has maintained probably for 20 plus years) is a long-time member of Overeaters' Anonymous. I see that the blogger on "pastaqueen.com" (linked on your home page) just announced a weight gain of 35 pounds, and other bloggers seem to have had the same experience (dietnakedblog.com, yawwblog.blogspot.com/). Oprah Winfrey and Kirstie Alley recently discussed the issue and their recent weight gains on Oprah's show.

Kate Harding, and the other fat acceptance bloggers, basically argue that maintaining weight loss is impossible, and women should simply accept themselves at the weight at which they wind up. I must say, I have a feeling like, "If Oprah can't maintain with all of the support and resources available to her, how is it possible for the average woman?" All of the scientific studies seem to suggest that it's impossible to maintain a weight loss (although I suppose there are those 10% of the persons who have done it).

Thank you for any thoughts, and thank you for this website.


http://refusetoregain.com/my_weblog...e-possible.html
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  #25   ^
Old Thu, May-14-09, 05:36
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mammac-5 mammac-5 is offline
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Plan: Ketogenic LCHF
Stats: 240/149/150 Female 5 feet 7 inches
BF:More than I'd like
Progress: 101%
Location: North Carolina
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Hey, y'all! I've been gone for a while enduring extreme academic stress...but now I'm done until August.

Judy, I need that link or page number to find the basics for South Beach, please. Time to get back on the horse!!

Corinne
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  #26   ^
Old Thu, May-14-09, 06:50
Judynyc's Avatar
Judynyc Judynyc is offline
Attitude is a Choice
Posts: 29,974
 
Plan: SBD->atkins twist->paleo
Stats: 274/000/160 Female 5'6"
BF:stl/too/mch
Progress: 240%
Location: NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mammac-5
Hey, y'all! I've been gone for a while enduring extreme academic stress...but now I'm done until August.

Judy, I need that link or page number to find the basics for South Beach, please. Time to get back on the horse!!

Corinne

Welcome Back Corinne!!

Here's a link to the thread where I post the food lists and meal plan charts for phase I and II.
http://forum.lowcarber.org/showthre...00&page=1&pp=15

Its the 2nd and 3rd posts, so that you can isolate the post for printing.
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  #27   ^
Old Thu, May-14-09, 10:36
mammac-5's Avatar
mammac-5 mammac-5 is offline
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Posts: 3,008
 
Plan: Ketogenic LCHF
Stats: 240/149/150 Female 5 feet 7 inches
BF:More than I'd like
Progress: 101%
Location: North Carolina
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Thanks, Judy. It's been a rough few months -- I was taking a lot of hours to be ready for grad school while also continuing to work. Not to mention some personal family stress...so

So I'm back and bringing a few extra pounds with me. My original goal weight was 155, but I hovered between 148-150 most of last summer. Today I was 160. So bummed! But I know it's all doable and I'm thinking of it like an illness...I'm glad I caught it early!

I'll be starting at Vanderbilt University in August so I've got a busy summer ahead of me. But there is NO WAY I'm buying uniforms and new jeans in larger sizes so 150, here I come! Now that classes are done for a while I'm dedicated to getting more gym time and eating healthier. I really started slipping on the junk foods lately so that's the first thing to go.

Thanks for letting me re-up into the group. I've missed it a lot.
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  #28   ^
Old Sun, May-17-09, 20:14
Judynyc's Avatar
Judynyc Judynyc is offline
Attitude is a Choice
Posts: 29,974
 
Plan: SBD->atkins twist->paleo
Stats: 274/000/160 Female 5'6"
BF:stl/too/mch
Progress: 240%
Location: NYC
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Refuse To Regain

Quote:
Responding to Rebecca: The Two Questions
Posted: 17 May 2009 01:53 PM PDT
By Barbara Berkeley
Our recent post featuring Rebecca’s question about the possiblity of long-term maintenance has been one of our most viewed and discussed entries. We knew there would be lots of terrific responses from readers and our expectations have been more than fulfilled. Your comments and encouragement have been superb. Thanks to all who have written. As usual, your words are thoughtful, well-written, and completely on target.
Lynn and I decided that we would post our responses to Rebecca after most of you had a chance to comment first. Since we are now a week or so out, I thought I’d write from my own perspective. Please feel free to continue commenting on the original post, however. This is a question that can’t be discussed too much.

As a clinician, I see two very distinct questions in the maintenance puzzle. Rebecca addresses both in her email, but most of our responders spoke to just one. The two questions are:
1. Is there something physical or psychological that makes regain inevitable?
2. Are there specific behaviors that allow someone to successfully maintain?
Those of you who are doing a good job staying at steady weight have figured out an answer for question two. As a result, most of you spoke to that second question in your responses. In the real world, the second question is, in fact, the more important one. If you’ve got that one licked, question one becomes nothing more than a curiosity.

For clinicians, though, the first question is hugely important. If doctors and scientists knew whether something hormonal or physical drove the body to regain weight, they might potentially design a treatment that would make maintenance much easier. Question one boils down to this: do we regain weight because we simply fall back into bad habits or do we regain because we have a physiologic disorder that encourages - even demands - that fat be reaccumulated?

Of course, we don’t know the answer. At this point, we can only take an educated guess. Based on patient observations, the information I have on human physiology and what little direct evidence exists, I have formulated the following opinion, but it’s only that - an opinion.

It seems to me that when someone starts to accumulate fat fairly extensively, something has already gone wrong with the body’s innate calorie balance mechanism. (For more on this theory, see earlier post on IBM). This malfunction can occur because the balance mechanism has had years of exposure to the SAD (Standard American Diet) or because of excessive caloric intake over shorter periods. It seems to me that once the system has malfunctioned, it tends to remain fragile permanently. This fragility predisposes POWs to weight regain unless they are extremely careful to avoid it. The analogy I often use in the office is that of the knee that has suffered a cartilage tear. If you stop exercising on that knee, it can heal up. Eventually you may be walking on it just fine. However, if you go back to stressing that knee (say, by running the marathon), it will probably start being a problem again. It remains fragile, a weak point in the body. This is one of the reasons that I believe so strongly in preventing weight gain in children. If we can prevent kids from weakening their IBMs, they will not have to struggle with bodies that tend to regain weight easily. Heading obesity off at the pass is the biggest favor we can do for the next generation of American children.

Reduced bodies belong to people who have already proved that they gain weight easily. That tendency remains. On the other hand, it flies in the face of any logic to claim that maintaining weight loss is impossible. Since the caloric balance system has been weakened, the answer to maintenance lies in finding a formula that avoids putting stress on that weak point. Once the formula is known, success comes from constant attention to this very individual plan.

A starting formula for weight maintenance is laid out in Refuse to Regain, but this is just one type of jumping-off point. Since the hormone that is most central to weight gain is insulin, a Primarian diet keeps weight off by asking the body for very little insulin secretion. Some individuals may have additional problems with fatty foods and salt. Each maintainer needs to start at some sort of baseline and work out his or her personal formula while watching the scale. The diet and lifestyle changes that only you can discover should become clear once the scale pivots around a fluctuation of several pounds. If you are staying within that small range, you have found the right formula for you. One person’s formula will not be the same as another’s, but certain constants are generally found.

First, total calories are kept rather low. Second, starches and sugars and much less prominent than in the SAD. Third, the diet tends to be low in saturated fats. Within these general guidelines, various maintainers will be able to add more or less foods, depending on their personal sensitivities.
Is it possible to maintain over the long run? Clearly, the answer is yes. But the effort takes constant attention, little tweaks to diet and behavior, and a real desire to be successful. There are many people in the world who eat diets that don’t conform to SAD norms. Each one of these people proves that various types of dietary formulas can be sustained permanently if they are important enough to the individual.

Nothing I’ve written above addresses the psychological components of regain. There is no question at all that many people regain because they use food in a drug-like way. This does not mean that they are weak or without willpower. It simply means that they have succumbed to the way most Americans eat--for the thrill of it. If a new maintainer finds that he or she is driven to eat by stresses or simply by habit, that person will benefit greatly from more intensive support. If eating is truly functioning as medication, psychological counseling may be in order. If it’s more a matter of habit, participation in group meetings or talking to other maintainers on the internet may work just as well.

Obesity is not destiny. If I did not believe that, I would have to close my doors and stop practicing. Having said that, I also believe that to truly love and care for your body (particularly when such care involves constant attention) is the stuff of personal heroism. Let’s continue to affirm that each one of us is capable of being a hero. As a community, we can assure those who are still in doubt that maintenance is not only possible, it’s a larger experience that will change the way you view not only your weight- but your life.

Last edited by Judynyc : Sun, May-17-09 at 20:28.
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  #29   ^
Old Tue, May-19-09, 23:22
SidC's Avatar
SidC SidC is offline
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Posts: 1,955
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 160/103/115 Female 62 inches
BF:
Progress: 127%
Location: Edmonton, AB Canada
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Demi, thanks for the link to Doreen's post. That was the one I was trying to remember. I started eating a fair amount of full-fat yogurt based on the Dr. Eades claim during OWL (1/2 cup with breakfast almost every day, and unsparingly in dinners and salads) and have also never noticed any adverse effects.

I do not think that any of us are doomed to regaining, unless we buy into the standard nutritionists' mantra that fat is forbidden and it's OK to eat simple white starches and low-fat foods. As Bowden said, "fat is not the enemy." Yes, transfats are evil. And I don't load my plate with saturated fats (though I'd much rather have a pat of butter than a tsp of sugar.) The unsaturated fats are good for you, and a little bit of fat for a snack (a few almonds, a bit of cheese) will sate the appetite for hours. Invariably, when someone trying Atkin's tells me that they're hungry all the time, it's because they are trying to do LC and low fat. Big mistake.

Quote:
Is it possible to maintain over the long run? Clearly, the answer is yes. But the effort takes constant attention, little tweaks to diet and behavior, and a real desire to be successful. There are many people in the world who eat diets that don’t conform to SAD norms. Each one of these people proves that various types of dietary formulas can be sustained permanently if they are important enough to the individual.

Yes, it takes constant attention. Is this surprising? Excelling at anything takes constant attention, whether it be a sport, intellectual achievement, or perfecting an omelette. It is a journey, and it does require that we change our habits. It's not a "diet." It is, truly, a change in our way of life. The Standard American Diet is a formula for failure.

But the formula for success does seem to vary individually. Atkins works for me, SB works for Judy, and I'm sure other maintaners all have their own tweaks. One thing I think has been crucial for me is being brutal about what works and not making exceptions. It makes for the occasional social awkwardness, but no, I don't have to eat a piece of chocolate cake just because it's your birthday.
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  #30   ^
Old Wed, May-20-09, 08:16
Judynyc's Avatar
Judynyc Judynyc is offline
Attitude is a Choice
Posts: 29,974
 
Plan: SBD->atkins twist->paleo
Stats: 274/000/160 Female 5'6"
BF:stl/too/mch
Progress: 240%
Location: NYC
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As I sit here with my 1/2 cup of full fat( yes, I do eat full fat yogurt! ) Fage yogurt...I salute you!!
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