Active Low-Carber Forums
Atkins diet and low carb discussion provided free for information only, not as medical advice.
Home Plans Tips Recipes Tools Stories Studies Products
Active Low-Carber Forums
A sugar-free zone


Welcome to the Active Low-Carber Forums.
Support for Atkins diet, Protein Power, Neanderthin (Paleo Diet), CAD/CALP, Dr. Bernstein Diabetes Solution and any other healthy low-carb diet or plan, all are welcome in our lowcarb community. Forget starvation and fad diets -- join the healthy eating crowd! You may register by clicking here, it's free!

Go Back   Active Low-Carber Forums > Main Low-Carb Diets Forums & Support > Low Carb Health & Technical Forums > Nutrition & Supplements
User Name
Password
Register FAQ Members Calendar Mark Forums Read Search Gallery My P.L.A.N. Survey


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #16   ^
Old Thu, Mar-05-09, 07:49
lil' annie lil' annie is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,276
 
Plan: quasi paleo + starch
Stats: 153/148/118 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 14%
Default

TWO grams of magnesium would be a medicinal dosage, like what doctors occassionally use for hospitalized heart patients.

However, it turns out that a high fat diet inhibits the absorption of magnesium, so maybe that is why some people on these boards can tolerate such a seemingly high amount.

Many of the magnesium rich foods are those which also tend to be high in carbohydrates.

People who have Crohn's or IBS or Celiac Disease also have problems assimilating magnesium.

If you are taking Vitamin D, it is essential to take extra magnesium.



=====================================================================

"....Early signs of magnesium deficiency include loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, and weakness. As magnesium deficiency worsens, numbness, tingling, muscle contractions and cramps, seizures, personality changes, abnormal heart rhythms, and coronary spasms can occur [1,3-4]. Severe magnesium deficiency can result in low levels of calcium in the blood (hypocalcemia). Magnesium deficiency is also associated with low levels of potassium in the blood (hypokalemia) [1,19-20].

Many of these symptoms are general and can result from a variety of medical conditions other than magnesium deficiency. It is important to have a physician evaluate health complaints and problems so that appropriate care can be given....

http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/magnesium.asp

=====================================================================

"What foods provide magnesium?

Green vegetables such as spinach are good sources of magnesium because the center of the chlorophyll molecule (which gives green vegetables their color) contains magnesium. Some legumes (beans and peas), nuts and seeds, and whole, unrefined grains are also good sources of magnesium [5]. Refined grains are generally low in magnesium [4-5]. When white flour is refined and processed, the magnesium-rich germ and bran are removed. Bread made from whole grain wheat flour provides more magnesium than bread made from white refined flour. Tap water can be a source of magnesium, but the amount varies according to the water supply. Water that naturally contains more minerals is described as "hard". "Hard" water contains more magnesium than "soft" water.

Eating a wide variety of legumes, nuts, whole grains, and vegetables will help you meet your daily dietary need for magnesium. Selected food sources of magnesium are listed in Table 1.....


http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/magnesium.asp
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #17   ^
Old Fri, Mar-06-09, 03:21
Hutchinson's Avatar
Hutchinson Hutchinson is offline
Registered Member
Posts: 2,886
 
Plan: Dr Dahlqvist's
Stats: 205/152/160 Male 69
BF:
Progress: 118%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nancy LC
Oh hey, I think Dr. Eades answered my question
but he says
Quote:
Take enough pills to get the RDI each day,
and that assumes the RDI is the optimum amount the human body needs. We know full well that with Vitamin d that level is set simply to avoid rickets and is not by any means the level at which the human body functions best.

From my readings about magnesium I am certain that "OFFICIAL" recommendations are as far from optimal as are "official" recommendations for Vitamin D3. I'm certainly not limiting my intake of magnesium or vitamin d3 to "offficial" RDA's and I think anyone who suggests "official" RDA's are the optimum levels the body works best with simply doesn't understand the history of why we have RDA's or what they are intended to achieve.
Reply With Quote
  #18   ^
Old Fri, Mar-06-09, 16:31
Zuleikaa Zuleikaa is online now
Posts: 16,678
 
Plan: Mishmash
Stats: 365/350.4/160 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 7%
Location: Maryland, US
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hutchinson
From my readings about magnesium I am certain that "OFFICIAL" recommendations are as far from optimal as are "official" recommendations for Vitamin D3. I'm certainly not limiting my intake of magnesium or vitamin d3 to "offficial" RDA's and I think anyone who suggests "official" RDA's are the optimum levels the body works best with simply doesn't understand the history of why we have RDA's or what they are intended to achieve.
I agree!!!!!
Reply With Quote
  #19   ^
Old Sun, Mar-08-09, 08:57
Hutchinson's Avatar
Hutchinson Hutchinson is offline
Registered Member
Posts: 2,886
 
Plan: Dr Dahlqvist's
Stats: 205/152/160 Male 69
BF:
Progress: 118%
Default

An inverse relationship between cumulating components of the metabolic syndrome and serum magnesium levels.Metabolic syndrome has been defined as the presence of abdominal obesity combined with 2 of the following factors: hypertension, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose tolerance, or diabetes mellitus.
Magnesium is an essential cofactor for more than 300 enzymes involved in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism.
In this study, we enrolled 117 consecutive overweight and obese patients and we measured serum magnesium levels together with fasting serum glucose, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triacylglycerols.
A strong inverse relationship between magnesium levels in serum and the presence of metabolic syndrome was noticed.
Moreover, magnesium levels decreased as the number of components of metabolic syndrome increased.
Also, there is an inverse relationship between serum magnesium levels and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein.
We concluded that decreased levels of serum magnesium are associated with increased risk for metabolic syndrome, perhaps by a low-grade inflammation process.
Reply With Quote
  #20   ^
Old Fri, Mar-04-11, 10:55
Magnesium Magnesium is offline
New Member
Posts: 1
 
Plan: my own
Stats: 110/145/150 Male 5 feet 8 inches
BF:
Progress:
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hutchinson
but he says and that assumes the RDI is the optimum amount the human body needs. We know full well that with Vitamin d that level is set simply to avoid rickets and is not by any means the level at which the human body functions best.

From my readings about magnesium I am certain that "OFFICIAL" recommendations are as far from optimal as are "official" recommendations for Vitamin D3. I'm certainly not limiting my intake of magnesium or vitamin d3 to "offficial" RDA's and I think anyone who suggests "official" RDA's are the optimum levels the body works best with simply doesn't understand the history of why we have RDA's or what they are intended to achieve.



I think you have a point. Will you please provide us a source to "the history of why we have RDA's or what they are intended to achieve" ? I can't seem to find anything on google. Thanks
Reply With Quote
  #21   ^
Old Sat, Mar-05-11, 04:06
Osprey101 Osprey101 is offline
Registered Member
Posts: 36
 
Plan: SCD
Stats: 152/152/152 Male 70 inches
BF:
Progress:
Default

Well, what *was* the RDA is now the Daily Reference Intake (DRI).

The RDA in turn came out of World War II, in order to determine the nutritional requirements of soldiers, civilians, and populations that might need nutritional support in war. They've been revised every few years (2-10 years) since.

Here's the thing: the DRI is for sufficiency for the average person, +/- 2 standard deviations. So, that covers 95% of the population, but also the 2.5% at the low end- for a total of 97.5% of all people under test.

Unfortunately, only the gross characteristics are taken into consideration. For example, the amount of D3 required to prevent rickets = easy to test. The amount required to reduce the risk of certain cancers? Much, much harder to evaluate.

Of course, if you're trying to design an MRE or a canned good, you're not too worried about long-term effects like heart disease, cancer, etc. You're worried about scurvy, rickets, night blindness, and so forth.

From this, it becomes difficult to say that complying with the DRI is any form of insurance against the effects of malnutrition for anything more than obvious, relatively short-term malnutrition.
Reply With Quote
  #22   ^
Old Sat, Aug-25-18, 10:40
s93uv3h's Avatar
s93uv3h s93uv3h is offline
 
Plan: Atkins & IF
Stats: 000/014.5/015 Male 5' 10"
BF:
Progress: 97%
Default

Reading that it can take months to get back to normal levels, so I may as well get started now - 300mg of Remag magnesium chloride / day.

Reply With Quote
  #23   ^
Old Sat, Aug-25-18, 12:04
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 8,569
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/218/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 31%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

Yes, body often needs time to make good use of a supplement.

A fish oil study showed 6 months-- so be patient. ( THis was for two groups VERY LOW; little effect seen in those with normal levels.)
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:43.


Copyright © 2000-2018 Active Low-Carber Forums @ forum.lowcarber.org
Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.