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  #16   ^
Old Wed, Jun-25-08, 17:54
lowcarbUgh's Avatar
lowcarbUgh lowcarbUgh is offline
Dazed and Confused
Posts: 2,927
 
Plan: South Beach
Stats: 170/132/135 Female 5'10
BF:
Progress: 109%
Location: Flip-flop, FL
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Christ was a relatively modern man. Humans began farming during the Neolithic period, 25,000 years ago. It was the only way to deal with an increasing population and shrinking hunting grounds. Everyone had the same type O blood type until agriculture when type A developed.

I've been reading a rather strange book called "Eat Right 4 Your Type," where a naturopathic doctor postulates that type Os are suited for a very high protein diet as their blood type is paleolithic.
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  #17   ^
Old Wed, Jun-25-08, 20:56
Cajunboy47 Cajunboy47 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 2,899
 
Plan: Eat Fat, Get Thin
Stats: 212/162/155 Male 68 "
BF:32/23.5/23.5
Progress: 88%
Location: Breaux Bridge, La
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I think the bread of biblical days was a little different from modern day breads...

Ref: http://www.copperwiki.org/index.php/Bread

The Journey of Bread --From the Farm to the Consumer

Most of the factory and even bakery produced bread has been subjected to processes and chemicals to give it a long shelf life, uniformity, coloration, and soft texture, with total disregard to the resulting nutritional deficiencies.

Seed -- Seed companies often use a mixture of fungicides and insecticide to control a broad range of seed pests.

Pesticides and fertlizers --These contain chemicals such as disulfoton (Di-syston), methyl parathion, chlorpyrifos, dimethoate, diamba and glyphosate. Though these are approved chemicals, excess exposure to these chemicals can increase our susceptibility to neurotoxic diseases as well as to certain kinds of cancer.

Hormones --Farmers use either natural hormones (extracted from other plants) or synthetic hormones such as Cycocel to regulate the growth of their crop i.e. time of germination of wheat and strength of the wheat stalk. Though there are evidences which show that increased exposures to such hormones might have an adverse impact on our health, no studies have yet been done that isolate the health risks of eating hormone-manipulated wheat.

Chemicals used during storage -- During long storage, wheat grains become vulnerable to critters. Even before the grain is stored for comercial purposes, the collection bins are sprayed with insecticide both on their outer and their inner surface.

Irradiation -- Wheat and wheat flour were some of the first foods approved by the the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for irradiation --exposing wheat berries to radiation to eradicate storage pests. A study conducted to ascertain the impact of irradiation was published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 1975, revealed that blood samples of four of the five children (fed for four weeks on a diet that included wheat product exposed to radiation) showed abnormal cell formation. See Wheaty Indiscretions

Artificial drying -- Artificial drying of damp grain at high temperatures results in reducing the nutritionla value of the grain and partially cooking its protein. If the grain is dried at temperatures not higher than 60 degrees Celsius or 140 degrees Fahrenheit, then its proteins and other nutritive properties are retained.

Processing and milling As high-speed mills are not able to grind the germ and the bran properly, the two most nutritious part of the grain are ejected. Operating at 400 degrees Fahrenheit, high speed mills destroy many vitamins and essential nutrients present in the bread.

Bleaching -- To give a bright white colour to the bread, the flour in many instances is treated with chemical bleach, leaving toxic residues which have been found to cause nervousness and seizures in animals.

Chemical preservatives More than 30 different chemicals approved by the Food and Drug Administration are routinely added to bread to extend its shelf life. These include ethylated mono and triglycerides, potassium bromate, potassium iodide, calcium proprionate, benzoyl peroxide, tricalcium phosphate, calcium sulfate, ammonium chloride and magnesium carbonate. However, little is known about their long-term toxicity and impact on human health when taken together.

Last edited by Cajunboy47 : Wed, Jun-25-08 at 20:58. Reason: highlighting
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  #18   ^
Old Thu, Jun-26-08, 00:48
Korban's Avatar
Korban Korban is offline
Registered Member
Posts: 423
 
Plan: Berstein's
Stats: 220/189/155 Male 68"
BF:
Progress: 48%
Location: S. Carolina US
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cajunboy47
I think the bread of biblical days was a little different from modern day breads...

Ref: http://www.copperwiki.org/index.php/Bread

The Journey of Bread --From the Farm to the Consumer

Most of the factory and even bakery produced bread has been subjected to processes and chemicals to give it a long shelf life, uniformity, coloration, and soft texture, with total disregard to the resulting nutritional deficiencies.

Seed -- Seed companies often use a mixture of fungicides and insecticide to control a broad range of seed pests.

Pesticides and fertlizers --These contain chemicals such as disulfoton (Di-syston), methyl parathion, chlorpyrifos, dimethoate, diamba and glyphosate. Though these are approved chemicals, excess exposure to these chemicals can increase our susceptibility to neurotoxic diseases as well as to certain kinds of cancer.

Hormones --Farmers use either natural hormones (extracted from other plants) or synthetic hormones such as Cycocel to regulate the growth of their crop i.e. time of germination of wheat and strength of the wheat stalk. Though there are evidences which show that increased exposures to such hormones might have an adverse impact on our health, no studies have yet been done that isolate the health risks of eating hormone-manipulated wheat.

Chemicals used during storage -- During long storage, wheat grains become vulnerable to critters. Even before the grain is stored for comercial purposes, the collection bins are sprayed with insecticide both on their outer and their inner surface.

Irradiation -- Wheat and wheat flour were some of the first foods approved by the the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for irradiation --exposing wheat berries to radiation to eradicate storage pests. A study conducted to ascertain the impact of irradiation was published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 1975, revealed that blood samples of four of the five children (fed for four weeks on a diet that included wheat product exposed to radiation) showed abnormal cell formation. See Wheaty Indiscretions

Artificial drying -- Artificial drying of damp grain at high temperatures results in reducing the nutritionla value of the grain and partially cooking its protein. If the grain is dried at temperatures not higher than 60 degrees Celsius or 140 degrees Fahrenheit, then its proteins and other nutritive properties are retained.

Processing and milling As high-speed mills are not able to grind the germ and the bran properly, the two most nutritious part of the grain are ejected. Operating at 400 degrees Fahrenheit, high speed mills destroy many vitamins and essential nutrients present in the bread.

Bleaching -- To give a bright white colour to the bread, the flour in many instances is treated with chemical bleach, leaving toxic residues which have been found to cause nervousness and seizures in animals.

Chemical preservatives More than 30 different chemicals approved by the Food and Drug Administration are routinely added to bread to extend its shelf life. These include ethylated mono and triglycerides, potassium bromate, potassium iodide, calcium proprionate, benzoyl peroxide, tricalcium phosphate, calcium sulfate, ammonium chloride and magnesium carbonate. However, little is known about their long-term toxicity and impact on human health when taken together.
Yeah, really weird that in 1920 at the dawn of the chemical age that life expectancy was 52 years... Some might argue the quality of life has improved as well... so what was your point Cajun?

/smile
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  #19   ^
Old Thu, Jun-26-08, 09:08
Nancy LC's Avatar
Nancy LC Nancy LC is offline
Experimenter
Posts: 45,269
 
Plan: Paleo 99.5%
Stats: 210/170/160 Female 67.5"
BF:
Progress: 80%
Location: San Diego, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lowcarbUgh
Christ was a relatively modern man. Humans began farming during the Neolithic period, 25,000 years ago. It was the only way to deal with an increasing population and shrinking hunting grounds. Everyone had the same type O blood type until agriculture when type A developed.

I've been reading a rather strange book called "Eat Right 4 Your Type," where a naturopathic doctor postulates that type Os are suited for a very high protein diet as their blood type is paleolithic.

Oooh... you went too far back. It was about 10,000 years. It started in the Middle East and spread, but in some areas farming is much newer than that. Actually, some cultures don't farm at all still, they're still nomadic herders.

Yeah, that book keeps rearing it's head in discussions on various bulletin boards. I think I'll write one called "Eat right for your zodiac sign" and see if I can do as well.
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  #20   ^
Old Thu, Jun-26-08, 09:22
Korban's Avatar
Korban Korban is offline
Registered Member
Posts: 423
 
Plan: Berstein's
Stats: 220/189/155 Male 68"
BF:
Progress: 48%
Location: S. Carolina US
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nancy LC
Oooh... you went too far back. It was about 10,000 years. It started in the Middle East and spread, but in some areas farming is much newer than that. Actually, some cultures don't farm at all still, they're still nomadic herders.

Yeah, that book keeps rearing it's head in discussions on various bulletin boards. I think I'll write one called "Eat right for your zodiac sign" and see if I can do as well.
Yeah, I think Barry Groves mentions that agronomy is only about 9,000 years old... no clue if he is right.

Regarding your upcoming book... will it be helpful to people that are on the cusp of two zodiac signs? Cancer/Leo here /sigh

/smile
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  #21   ^
Old Thu, Jun-26-08, 09:41
Nancy LC's Avatar
Nancy LC Nancy LC is offline
Experimenter
Posts: 45,269
 
Plan: Paleo 99.5%
Stats: 210/170/160 Female 67.5"
BF:
Progress: 80%
Location: San Diego, CA
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I think based on that zodiac sign you should be eating a diet consisting primarily of potatoes and rice.

If that doesn't suit you then you're doing something wrong or you're not channeling your energy properly. Perhaps some ear candling would help?
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  #22   ^
Old Thu, Jun-26-08, 09:44
lowcarbUgh's Avatar
lowcarbUgh lowcarbUgh is offline
Dazed and Confused
Posts: 2,927
 
Plan: South Beach
Stats: 170/132/135 Female 5'10
BF:
Progress: 109%
Location: Flip-flop, FL
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Yes, 10,000 years is the correct figure. That will teach me to drink and post.

The books posits some strange theories about blood types. I was mildly interested it in because of the fact that I don't really enjoy eating meat and I'm a type A, whom the author thinks is bested suited for a macrobiotic diet. But I read it mostly because I'm a book slut.
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  #23   ^
Old Thu, Jun-26-08, 10:31
Korban's Avatar
Korban Korban is offline
Registered Member
Posts: 423
 
Plan: Berstein's
Stats: 220/189/155 Male 68"
BF:
Progress: 48%
Location: S. Carolina US
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nancy LC
I think based on that zodiac sign you should be eating a diet consisting primarily of potatoes and rice.

If that doesn't suit you then you're doing something wrong or you're not channeling your energy properly. Perhaps some ear candling would help?
That is consistent with some links Cajun posted earlier. You really know your stuff. I hear that Snickers are good too...

/smile
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  #24   ^
Old Thu, Jun-26-08, 10:33
lowcarbUgh's Avatar
lowcarbUgh lowcarbUgh is offline
Dazed and Confused
Posts: 2,927
 
Plan: South Beach
Stats: 170/132/135 Female 5'10
BF:
Progress: 109%
Location: Flip-flop, FL
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I'm an Aries - a sheep. Maybe that explains my preference for vegetation!
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  #25   ^
Old Thu, Jun-26-08, 10:36
Korban's Avatar
Korban Korban is offline
Registered Member
Posts: 423
 
Plan: Berstein's
Stats: 220/189/155 Male 68"
BF:
Progress: 48%
Location: S. Carolina US
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lowcarbUgh
I'm an Aries - a sheep. Maybe that explains my preference for vegetation!
Interesting... Sheep really are very sensitive to copper... and this is no joke this time...

/smile
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  #26   ^
Old Thu, Jun-26-08, 10:51
Nancy LC's Avatar
Nancy LC Nancy LC is offline
Experimenter
Posts: 45,269
 
Plan: Paleo 99.5%
Stats: 210/170/160 Female 67.5"
BF:
Progress: 80%
Location: San Diego, CA
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No, Aries are actually at their best when they practice cannibalism. Fava beans and a nice chianti would also be allowed to an aries.
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  #27   ^
Old Thu, Jun-26-08, 10:52
lowcarbUgh's Avatar
lowcarbUgh lowcarbUgh is offline
Dazed and Confused
Posts: 2,927
 
Plan: South Beach
Stats: 170/132/135 Female 5'10
BF:
Progress: 109%
Location: Flip-flop, FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Korban
I hear that Snickers are good too...

/smile


I'd rather eat a snickers than whole grain bread. I can come up with a bolus that works for snickers....
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  #28   ^
Old Thu, Jun-26-08, 10:54
chandbaby1's Avatar
chandbaby1 chandbaby1 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 750
 
Plan: PPLPish<30ecc.
Stats: 180/165/150 Female 5 foot 5 inches
BF:
Progress: 50%
Location: Boston
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Quote:
No, Aries are actually at their best when they practice cannibalism. Fava beans and a nice chianti would also be allowed to an aries.



Susan, No you cant have my hand for dinner today What about libra?
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  #29   ^
Old Thu, Jun-26-08, 10:57
lowcarbUgh's Avatar
lowcarbUgh lowcarbUgh is offline
Dazed and Confused
Posts: 2,927
 
Plan: South Beach
Stats: 170/132/135 Female 5'10
BF:
Progress: 109%
Location: Flip-flop, FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nancy LC
No, Aries are actually at their best when they practice cannibalism. Fava beans and a nice chianti would also be allowed to an aries.


That's gross. I don't eat liver!
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  #30   ^
Old Thu, Jun-26-08, 10:58
Korban's Avatar
Korban Korban is offline
Registered Member
Posts: 423
 
Plan: Berstein's
Stats: 220/189/155 Male 68"
BF:
Progress: 48%
Location: S. Carolina US
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nancy LC
No, Aries are actually at their best when they practice cannibalism. Fava beans and a nice chianti would also be allowed to an aries.
No. We begin by coveting what we see every day. Don't you feel eyes moving over your body, Clarice err Susan? And don't your eyes seek out the things you want?

/smile
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