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  #1   ^
Old Tue, Dec-03-13, 02:43
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Plan: LCHF
Stats: 215/170/160 Female 5'10"
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Location: UK
Default Short bursts in gym ‘key’ to weight loss

Quote:
From The Times
London, UK
3 December, 2013

Short bursts in gym ‘key’ to weight loss

For the gym-shy, it is manna from heaven: a health guru is advocating short workouts as a key to losing weight.

Michael Mosley, a doctor and television presenter, is taking on scientists by saying that people with busy lives need spend only a few minutes a day doing exercise. As workouts go on, he said, the benefits decrease.

“We think that if we do 20 minutes’ exercise, then it must be better if we do 40 minutes a day. What scientists are saying [is] that is not necessarily true. Most of the benefits you get from exercise are in the first period and then after that there is a rapid law of diminishing returns.”

High-intensity training (HIT) has become part of a fad for fast-track fitness. Dr Mosley was also behind the 5:2 diet, which allows followers to spend five days of the week eating whatever they like and two days eating a quarter of their recommended daily quota, or 500 calories for women and 600 for men. HIT is based on the theory that even 40 seconds of intense physical activity can make a difference for those who are time-poor or exercise-averse.

Dr Mosley’s new book, Fast Exercise, was written with Peta Bee with a foreword by Jamie Timmons, of Loughborough University, and taps into a trend for shorter, more intense workouts. It comes after a book published in the United States by Gretchen Reynolds, a columnist on The New York Times. There have also been academic studies. Dr Mosley, who presented the BBC programme, Trust Me I’m A  Doctor, wrote that readers will “be pleased to hear that the question occupying the minds of many of those at the forefront of exercise research is not so much ‘How can we get people to do more?’ but ‘How can we get more for less?’ ”.

He suggested that people selected workouts depending on their preference for running, cycling, swimming, rowing, skipping or cross-training and how new they were to HIT. No workout lasts longer than 20 minutes and the minimum lasts between four and six minutes, including recovery time.

Dr Mosley said that the regime complements the 5:2 diet well, given that exercise alone would not lead to weight loss — people must eat less food as well.

Fast exercise produces more mitochondria, power cells which burn fat, and the diet appears to get rid of old mitochondria, Dr Mosley said. “One of the things that is clear from fasting is that during these periods without food your body gets on with spring cleaning,” he said. “If you think of mitochondria as batteries, you want more of them because they provide power, but you also need to get rid of the old ones.”

HIT appears to suppress appetite in a way that low-intensity exercise does not, making it ideal if you are on a fast day, he said. So, if you are struggling to get through your two fast days a week, try a couple of ten-second sprints up a hill. You might feel less peckish, said Dr Mosley, a lot more fit, and relieved that you can relax for the rest of the day.
http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/healt...icle3938123.ece


Fast Exercise at Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/Fast-Exercise.../dp/1780721986/

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Fast-Exerci.../dp/1780721986/
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  #2   ^
Old Sun, Sep-14-14, 06:36
E.W. E.W. is offline
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Posts: 37
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 307/286/168 Male 67
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I started doing this 2 weeks ago that is 2 or 3 days with about 5 to 10 min. to warm up and then a couple of 20 sec. sprints. I seem to be getting more out of this than walking 30 min. 4 or 5 days a week. That is my mood has picked up some and I have cut down my eating just a little bit. As was commented it seems that the key to this is putting the mitrochondria under stress which reminds me of another study. In that study the subjects took about 1000mg of vitamin C and 400mg of vitamin E. and the control group didn't take the vitamins. When both groups did a few weeks of aerobic exercise the group that took the vitamins did not improve there insulin sensitivity. I do wonder if you would get much more out of doing these short HIIT sessions 5 or 6 days a week or if it's best to just do them twice a week.
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  #3   ^
Old Sat, Oct-18-14, 10:38
bkloots's Avatar
bkloots bkloots is offline
Posts: 8,831
 
Plan: Atkins/LCHF
Stats: 195/149.7/135 Female 63in
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Location: Kansas City, MO
Default

I can see how this might work for some people.

Although it sounds very "doable" I can't see myself sprinting up the stairs, say at my workplace, to arrive at the staff meeting red-faced and breaking a sweat

Anyway, this could be good for some people to try, including the fasting days, which lines up with good reports on intermittent fasting of one kind or another.
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  #4   ^
Old Mon, Feb-02-15, 21:54
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CMCM CMCM is offline
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Plan: LCHF / Atkins '72
Stats: 173/139.2/130 Female 5'7"
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Progress: 79%
Location: Northern Calif. mountains
Default

Gosh, I do think there's something to this. I used to do longer cardio sessions, 45 min. to an hour, and I'd usually follow it up with a 30 to 45 minute weight session and at times, my goal was to do this 4 to 6 times a week. Of course, long term I couldn't sustain this and eventually I'd abandon it. I'd be exhausted after exercising, and later on, ravenous as a result, so I think I ended up eating more because of all the exercise. I had a hard time believing you could get better results with shorter cardio, but I now think it's true. I've cut down to about 3 workouts per week, and I've cut my cardio down to 30 minutes max, sometimes only 20 minutes. I always incorporate HIIT into the cardio, and I think it works just as well if not better this way. I believe my results are better doing less. For one thing, I don't see any increased appetite from this kind of regime now. I've left the weights part of things the same, 30 to 45 minutes usually. The weights are my favorite.
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  #5   ^
Old Mon, Feb-02-15, 21:59
CMCM's Avatar
CMCM CMCM is offline
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Posts: 3,853
 
Plan: LCHF / Atkins '72
Stats: 173/139.2/130 Female 5'7"
BF:28.3%
Progress: 79%
Location: Northern Calif. mountains
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by E.W.
I started doing this 2 weeks ago that is 2 or 3 days with about 5 to 10 min. to warm up and then a couple of 20 sec. sprints. I seem to be getting more out of this than walking 30 min. 4 or 5 days a week. That is my mood has picked up some and I have cut down my eating just a little bit. As was commented it seems that the key to this is putting the mitrochondria under stress which reminds me of another study. In that study the subjects took about 1000mg of vitamin C and 400mg of vitamin E. and the control group didn't take the vitamins. When both groups did a few weeks of aerobic exercise the group that took the vitamins did not improve there insulin sensitivity. I do wonder if you would get much more out of doing these short HIIT sessions 5 or 6 days a week or if it's best to just do them twice a week.


I remember reading that the HIIT sparked a metabolic response that lasted a couple of days, and I don't think you are supposed to do HIIT type cardio 5 or 6 times a week. Right now I've cut down to 3, and I think it's working well. More cardio is not necessarily better. I am guilty of over-doing cardio in the past, and once I read "as you adapt, you can go longer and longer, first 15 minutes, then 30, then an hour, then that gets easy. So what is your goal? To do cardio all day?". This really made sense to me, and I also read some things about experiments done by a Japanese expert, I think it was, and they really documented the success of short HIIT bursts within a shorter period of cardio and only a couple of times a week. I'll see if I can find it, I haven't read it in a long time. But it all made sense and I loved the logic and science behind it, so much as I worried about "not doing enough", I think everything is better or at least just as good doing far less. I'm not exhausting myself like before, I'm not burning out, and I'm losing weight better.

Last edited by CMCM : Mon, Feb-02-15 at 22:04.
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  #6   ^
Old Mon, Feb-02-15, 22:07
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CMCM CMCM is offline
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Posts: 3,853
 
Plan: LCHF / Atkins '72
Stats: 173/139.2/130 Female 5'7"
BF:28.3%
Progress: 79%
Location: Northern Calif. mountains
Default

Here it is, the HIIT theory I mentioned above. It was a Dr. Tabata.

Link to article: http://fitness.mercola.com/sites/fi...ta-workout.aspx

In this link, there is a recommendation to do only 30 seconds of HIIT followed by 90 seconds of a slower pace. The goal is a total of 8 of these HIIT segments. He suggests 3 times a week. There's also a demo video of what the HIIT part should be like on an elliptical. I was happy to find these because this is what I've been doing, more or less, although my level of intensity isn't as much as in the video. Today I did 12 HIIT segments, so maybe I'll scale back a bit to 8. But I'm doing 3x per week, never two days i a row.

From the linked page: "High-intensity interval training (HIIT) gives a natural boost to human growth hormone (HGH) production, which is essential for optimal health, strength and vigor. HIIT has also been shown to significantly improve insulin sensitivity, boost fat loss, and increase muscle growth
According to Japanese research, a mere four minutes of exercise performed at extreme intensity, four times a week, can improve your anaerobic capacity by 28 percent, and your VO2 max and maximal aerobic power by 15 percent in as little as six weeks
Study participants who performed an hour of steady cardiovascular exercise on a stationary bike five times a week only improved VO2 max by 10 percent, and their regimen had no effect on their anaerobic capacity after six weeks
Previous research showed that just three minutes of HIIT per week for four weeks improved participants’ insulin sensitivity by an average of 24 percent"

I also thought this was an amazing statement, within same link above:

Other research has also demonstrated that 20 minutes of high intensity training, two to three times a week, can yield greater results than slow and steady conventional aerobics done five times a week. But the fact that you can improve your insulin sensitivity by nearly 25 percent with a time investment of less than ONE HOUR A MONTH really shows that you can significantly improve your health without having to eliminate hours of other commitments from your calendar.

Last edited by CMCM : Mon, Feb-02-15 at 22:19.
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  #7   ^
Old Mon, Feb-02-15, 22:15
Nancy LC's Avatar
Nancy LC Nancy LC is offline
Experimenter
Posts: 45,206
 
Plan: Paleo 99.5%
Stats: 210/170/160 Female 67.5"
BF:
Progress: 80%
Location: San Diego, CA
Default

I am doing this now too. I do 5 minute warmups before I lift. Now I add 3 20-30 second sprints to it.

It probably is coincidence, but I'm feeling warmer at work where they usually have the AC turned too high. Perhaps my metabolism is revving up? I've also had some appetite suppression the last day or two. It could be from this, or the new probiotics I'm taking.

Well, we shall see!

Now, if I can keep from having an inadvertent carb-up, maybe I could see some weight loss!
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  #8   ^
Old Sun, Feb-15-15, 12:58
dan_rose dan_rose is offline
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Posts: 126
 
Plan: None
Stats: 161/149/154 Male 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 171%
Location: Loughborough, UK
Default

Here's a plan with just two 20s sprints with 3mins in between:

http://www.highoctaneride.com/frequ...sked-questions/
(click "The exact protocol")

They make out you need a special bike but I just set mine to a fairly high resistance (such that I can only just finish the 20s) and pedal very slowly in between the sprints. My bike also has arm handles attached to the peddles so I work more of the body.
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  #9   ^
Old Sat, Apr-25-15, 14:55
Jenny77 Jenny77 is offline
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Posts: 22
 
Plan: #####
Stats: 000/000/000 Female 0'0"
BF:
Progress: 24%
Default

I started this today on the Elliptical when going all out set the resistance between 7-9. Then back to 2 for the rest period. I only did 13 minutes of this but I could really feel the burn. Will see how this affects my weight loss.
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  #10   ^
Old Sun, Aug-02-15, 13:12
dan_rose dan_rose is offline
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Posts: 126
 
Plan: None
Stats: 161/149/154 Male 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 171%
Location: Loughborough, UK
Default

Another article on this method of exercising here (dailymail UK)
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