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  #46   ^
Old Thu, Jun-14-18, 12:06
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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Posts: 6,961
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/225/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 23%
Location: Massachusetts
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Thank you!!!!
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  #47   ^
Old Thu, Jun-14-18, 12:32
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 6,961
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/225/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 23%
Location: Massachusetts
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Here is one Dr. but unclear if she is an MD.She is affiliated with MIT based on the email address given. A PhD??? Still looking for MD that gave a lecture on the statistics used and how doctors are bamboozled by the advertizing machine of the pharmacutical company.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k8-TT87WLBg

More on her view of cholesterol

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u2Hkunxkzfw

This research doctor talks about the necesity of supporting the body with correct levels of basic nutrients to stop the cascade effect. Iron, manganese, zinc... and more.

A great diet from organic foods and a wide variety including sufficient proteins to make the tryptophans that absorb the blue waves.....

DIET !!!!
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  #48   ^
Old Fri, Jun-15-18, 03:54
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
To Good Health!
Posts: 10,159
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
Location: NC
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My long response in the cholesterol/statin thread, her doctorate is in Computer Science, but she has written (and testified) on link between autism and Round-up. Highly controversial.
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  #49   ^
Old Fri, Jun-15-18, 07:30
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 6,961
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/225/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 23%
Location: Massachusetts
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Janet,thanks for thei input.

Last edited by Ms Arielle : Fri, Jun-15-18 at 11:45.
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  #50   ^
Old Fri, Jun-15-18, 09:27
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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Posts: 6,961
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/225/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 23%
Location: Massachusetts
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copied from Jenny's page--

Quote:
How (and why) to tame your hyperfocus
October 5, 2015

People with ADHD can achieve almost superhuman levels of focus (referred to as hyperfocus) in some situations, yet none at all in others. That’s because ADHD isn’t an attention deficit, but a broken attention regulation system.

Hyperfocus is our secret superpower. Often, it’s also our undoing. Capable of an amazing state of flow, we’re unstoppable, and it’s easy to get ‘sucked in.’ That’s why it’s so important to reign in our hyperfocus: unstoppable even to ourselves, we become a runaway train…and we all know how that ends.

Unchecked, hyperfocusing ADHD’ers neglect all other responsibilities. Work, school, family, or romantic relationships may suffer. Health may decline due to frequent all-nighters and missed meals (have you ever gotten in the zone and forgotten to eat?).

The good news is, you can learn to let your hyperfocus run wild in a controlled environment. It’s not easy, but here are some tips to get you started.

Know your triggers and risky behaviors

Keep a log of activities that run away with you. What time of day was it? What else was going on?

Eventually, you’ll see a pattern. For example: I don’t particularly like sewing {painting!}, but it’s one of the few projects that gets me out of control, always wanting to eliminate one more rough edge. And when I’m tired or frustrated, I’m more likely to waste time on Facebook {computer solitaire!} because my brain can’t get in gear.

Know yourself. Know when you’re more likely to lose control, even if you don’t necessarily feel like it’s a bad thing: “Sure I went to bed at 3:00 a.m., but I got so much done!”

Limit time spent on high-risk activities

In her habits book, Better Than Before, Gretchen Rubin tells us to “decide not to decide.” In other words, set boundaries ahead of time and commit to sticking to them. For example:
Only one one-hour or two half-hour TV shows per night
Never open Facebook after 9:30 pm
Don't start a new computer programming task within one hour of bedtime

Don’t let your brain talk you out of it. It will tell you things like:
“If you just do this one little thing, you can get the program working”
“If you sew this side seam, you’ll just have the bottom hem to do tomorrow”
“It’s only 25 more minutes, and we need to watch the resolution of this cliffhanger.”

There will always be one more thing, even after that one more thing. Decide not to decide.

You also need breaks — ideally, before you think you need them. Read up on the Pomodoro Technique , which advocates a system of regularly spaced short and long breaks to keep your brain functioning at its peak.

Set a timer. Don’t trust yourself to watch the clock, or even to remember time exists.

Whatever you do, get up and stretch for a few minutes every half hour or so. It’ll break the spell and remind you of the real world — and the people in it who count on you.

Use gentle reminders that involve the senses

If you’re trying to break the spell of someone else’s hyperfocus, avoid getting angry. The ADHD person isn’t fully present in this interaction. They may not remember a conversation that occurs during hyperfocus, and they may not even notice anything happening around them.

Because hyperfocus takes us so deep into the zone, we often need more than a simple, “Time to leave for dinner — now.” Create a sensory event to bring consciousness back to the real world. Turn the lights off, provide a gentle touch on the arm or shoulder, or set a timer with a loud bell. If an electronic device is involved, turn it off — but only if you’ve agreed beforehand that this is okay!

You can do this for yourself, too, especially if you invest in something like a WeMo switch or, if you want to go simple, a lamp timer that will turn off the lights or computer at a predetermined time. Apps and browser extensions — like the Productivity Owl for Google Chrome — can help limit time on specific websites.

http://adhdhomestead.net/hyperfocus/
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  #51   ^
Old Mon, Jun-18-18, 17:49
s93uv3h's Avatar
s93uv3h s93uv3h is offline
 
Plan: Atkins & IF
Stats: 000/013/015 Male 5' 10"
BF:
Progress: 87%
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Recent instagram post by Dr. Rhonda Patrick:

A new study found sulforaphane (found in broccoli sprouts) improved behavior and social responsiveness in children with autism spectrum disorder. It also found that clinical improvements were correlated with two urinary metabolites known to be involved in redox metabolism, which sulforaphane is known to affect.

This study builds upon findings from a prior randomized, placebo-controlled trial which showed sulforaphane improved symptoms of autism in young adults.

This study did NOT use sprouts. Instead, they used a supplement called Avmacol that has the precursor to sulforaphane (called glucoraphanin) along with the active enzyme (called myrosinase) that converts glucoraphanin into sulforaphane.
This particular supplement has been validated by researchers at The Cullman Chemoprotection Center at Johns Hopkins University. See my interview with Johns Hopkins scientist Dr. Jed Fahey for more info on some of the supplements out there and also the early work on autism and the brain.

The net dose of sulforaphane for the pills involved in this trial is around 40 μmol per two tablets of the supplement. All enrolled children were provided weight-based dosing of sulforaphane (~ 2.5 μmol glucoraphanin per lb of body weight). You can find the episode on sulforaphane with Dr. Fahey along with show notes and a transcript on the foundmyfitness episodes page:
https://www.foundmyfitness.com/episodes/jed-w-fahey

Link to the new trial:
Identification of urinary metabolites that correlate with clinical improvements in children with autism treated with sulforaphane from broccoli. 5-30-2018

Link to the previous RCT:
Sulforaphane treatment of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) 10-28-2014
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  #52   ^
Old Mon, Jun-18-18, 18:21
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 6,961
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/225/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 23%
Location: Massachusetts
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Very interesting that brocalli sprouts might help. And fortunate that they are tastey, too.
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  #53   ^
Old Mon, Jun-18-18, 19:35
s93uv3h's Avatar
s93uv3h s93uv3h is offline
 
Plan: Atkins & IF
Stats: 000/013/015 Male 5' 10"
BF:
Progress: 87%
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The video, while long at almost two and a half hours, does have a detailed outline on topics covered in her first pinned comment, with links to the specific video point. Here's the link to 1:09:00 where he talks about Autism.
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  #54   ^
Old Mon, Jun-18-18, 19:41
s93uv3h's Avatar
s93uv3h s93uv3h is offline
 
Plan: Atkins & IF
Stats: 000/013/015 Male 5' 10"
BF:
Progress: 87%
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more from the video:

Fever eases behavioral problems in some children with autism 9-18-2017

Behaviors associated with fever in children with autism spectrum disorders. 12-2007

CONCLUSIONS:

We documented behavior change among children with autism spectrum disorders during fever. The data suggest that these changes might not be solely the byproduct of general effects of sickness on behavior; however, more research is needed to prove conclusively fever-specific effects and elucidate their underlying biological mechanisms (possibly involving immunologic and neurobiological pathways, intracellular signaling, and synaptic plasticity).


Children with autism spectrum disorder who improve with fever: Insights from the Simons Simplex Collection. 1-2018

LAY SUMMARY:

This study explored characteristics of children with ASD who are reported to improve during fever. Parents of 17% of children with ASD report improvements across a range of domains during fever including cognition, communication, repetitive behaviors, social interaction, and behavior. Children who are reported to improve during fever have significantly lower non-verbal cognitive skills and language levels and more repetitive behaviors. Understanding the profiles of children who improve during episodes of fever may provide insights into new treatments for ASD.
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  #55   ^
Old Mon, Jun-25-18, 09:10
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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Posts: 6,961
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/225/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 23%
Location: Massachusetts
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Bringing this over to evaluate the info further-- it fits with my understanding so far. Low seratonin is not a good thing--how to raise it up but not loose the effects of LC.
http://www.radiantrecovery.com/reso...oninbulimia.htm

Quote:
Reduced serotonin activity related to low tryptophan intake may lead to bulimia nervosa

In a recently published article, researchers found that recovering bulimics are very vulnerable to the effects of low serotonin. "These findings suggest that lowered brain serotonin function can trigger some of the clinical features of bulimia nervosa in individuals vulnerable to the disorder," the authors commented.

Dieting makes low serotonin levels worse.

If you are sugar sensitive, you are likely to have both low levels of serotonin and low levels of beta endoprhion. The low serotonin levels can be made worse by dieting. This means you have even less impulse control than you started with.

You may feel stressed, overwhelmed and inadequate (a function of low beta-endorphin) and one day try some sort of bulimic behavior such as throwing up, using laxatives or doing compulsive exercise. These all evoke beta-endorphin.

Your continuing low self-esteem, trigger events, or stress still demand the need to "feel better." DO SOMETHING your brain yells, and you choose the most effective tool for feeling more in control.

Low serotonin levels mean low impulse control.

If you have been dieting, your serotonin levels are depleted and your impulse control goes out the window. Even though rationally you know that throwing up is not a good solution, you will feel more confident and safer when you do. Even if you tell yourself to stop, you are not able to control the impulse.

The brain chemistry of the PnP plan is VERY real. The plan can have a huge effect on helping resolve an eating disorder such as bulimia.

The Potato Plan helps you get back on track.

Here is how: regular, consistent meals with protein increase tryptophan levels in the blood. The spud before bed gets tryptophan into your brain to raise serotonin levels.

The vitamins help the conversion of tryptophan into serotonin. Going off sugars stops the beta-endophin priming which creates craving. Exercise, meditation, prayer, Mozart, relational sex, raise beta-endorphin levels naturally to create confidence and a sense of well being.

Do the food plan outlined in Potatoes Not Prozac, and you will find a huge support for your own recovery from bulimia.
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  #56   ^
Old Thu, Jul-12-18, 06:51
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
To Good Health!
Posts: 10,159
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
Location: NC
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Dr Davis has a good new summary blog post on the effect of grains on autism, brain fog, ADHD, etc.

https://www.wheatbellyblog.com/2018...d-so-much-more/

Quote:
Eliminate brain fog and more

When we consume anything that triggers an inflammatory response, we expose ourselves to a much greater risk for a smorgasbord of health challenges, from chronic daily nuisances like headaches and brain fog to serious ailments such as depression and Alzheimer’s. We can link grain consumption with some of the most mysterious brain disorders that have eluded the medical community for years, such as schizophrenia, epilepsy, depression, bipolar disorder, and, more recently, autism and ADHD.
Are you and your kids unknowingly under the influence of opiates? Opiates are disguised in many forms.


Grains contain opiates. Not figuratively, but quite literally. These opiates are not too different from morphine or heroin. Yes, wheat and grains, cleverly disguised as a multigrain loaf of bread to make sandwiches or a hot, steamy plate of macaroni and cheese for the kids are mind-altering drugs. You and your kids are not oxycodone addicts, but when you consume wheat and grains, the results are not all that different.
...continues
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  #57   ^
Old Thu, Jul-12-18, 07:20
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 6,961
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/225/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 23%
Location: Massachusetts
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Holy Cow, Ive NEVER heard this effect described in such an extreme manner. Hae yet to read the whole article, and will later today when I can devote the time it deserves, otherwise I feel like Dr A talked about the carbs taking over and running our lives....was he on the same track?
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  #58   ^
Old Thu, Jul-12-18, 09:05
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 2,195
 
Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JEY100
Dr Davis has a good new summary blog post on the effect of grains on autism, brain fog, ADHD, etc.

https://www.wheatbellyblog.com/2018...d-so-much-more/

Dr. Davis makes some very important points. It's why carb addiction awareness is becoming more prevalent today. Eliminating grains and primarily wheat along with all the rapid carbs (sugars) they can be combined with has made a world of difference for many. Mac and cheese? Why don't you just eat ice cream and cobbler? Pretty much the same, and the real, severe impact occurs over time with these "comfort foods." I've learned to despise that term.
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  #59   ^
Old Thu, Jul-12-18, 11:18
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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Posts: 6,961
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/225/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 23%
Location: Massachusetts
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Mac 'n CHeese--- at times I miss it, a thick and creamy dish my mother often made....... I stopped making it long ago. My kids have never had it..... think I already mentioned this.....
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